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Governance

Wyn Grant
Department of Politics and
International Studies
University of Warwick
What is
governance
■ Lessons from the ESRC Whitehall
programme
What it isn’t
■ Not the classic Whitehall model
with a strong executive running a
unitary state
■ Not New Public Management with
emphasis on a search for
efficiency through contracts and
markets
What it is
■ Governance emphasises self-
organising, inter-organisational
networks
■ Interdependence. Broader than
government brings in non-state
actors as traditional boundaries
between public and private (state
and market) blur
What happens?
■ Network members interact
continually to exchange resources
and negotiate shared purposes
■ An example in the food chain
would be high quality, value added
food products
Where is the
state?
■ Autonomy from the state, but it can
indirectly steer networks
■ Whether shift from direct to indirect
controls reduces or enhances state
power is contentious
Multi-level
governance
■ Dispersion of authority upwards to
EU and downwards to devolved
administration
■ Horizontal layering of power exists
alongside vertical connections
■ Vertical connections by definition
important in food chain
Ownership
■ Old models of accountability no
longer work
■ Many decisions are shared
between different competences,
e.g., food safety
■ Difficult for citizen to know who is
responsible
Adequacy of new
models
■ How adequate are private models
of governance?
■ For example, retailers as
surrogates for consumers in food
chain
Policy
complexity
■ EU follows German model of
federalism, complex distrbution of
responsibilities, e.g., pesticides
Regulatory state
model
■ Wolfe - effort to make state power
more efficient. Markets operate as
self-organising media of indirect
control
■ Majone - EU as regulatory state,
lacks fiscal policy instruments
■ Moran - displaces command state
and self-regulation leading to
efficiency gains
New politics
■ A politics of collective consumption
replaces a politics of production
■ Shift produces tensions in polity,
e.g., loss of trust in traditional
institutions, increasing resort to
direct action
■ Effective governance in food chain
needed
Introduction
■ State the purpose of the discussion
■ Identify yourself
Topics of
Discussion
■ State the main ideas you’ll be
talking about
Topic One
■ Details about this topic
■ Supporting information and
examples
■ How it relates to your audience
Topic Two
■ Details about this topic
■ Supporting information and
examples
■ How it relates to your audience
Topic Three
■ Details about this topic
■ Supporting information and
examples
■ How it relates to your audience
Real Life
■ Give an example or real life
anecdote
■ Sympathize with the audience’s
situation if appropriate
What This Means
■ Add a strong statement that
summarizes how you feel or think
about this topic
■ Summarize key points you want
your audience to remember
Next Steps
■ Summarize any actions required of
your audience
■ Summarize any follow up action
items required of you