Executive Coaching

Approach and Competency Model

1. Renewal Process

A. Direction and Meaning

C. Sustainable Ecology

B. Disciplined Implementation

2. Direction and Meaning

Clarity

Purpose and Vision

Direction and Meaning

3. Disciplined Implementation

Focussed Planning

Reference and Review System

Disciplined Implementation

4. Sustainable Ecology

Life Long Learning

Relationships and Support

Sustainable Ecology

5. Competencies

PROCESS ELEMENT

FOCUS AREA

COMPETENCY

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION
Practicing mindful interaction, eating, exercising, thinking Develop desired outcome for life, work and relationships Align desired values with values in action Setting achievable outcomes that are aligned with personal ecology Conducting a total mind and life sweep Categorising, scheduling projects and actions

Clarity

Mindful Living Visioning

Direction and Meaning

Purpose and Vision

Vales Alignment

SMART Goal Setting

De-cluttering Focused Planning Action Planning

Disciplined Implementation

Pacing Action Reference And Review System (For Tenacious Implementation)

Systematically executing action steps and recording outcomes

Reflecting While Doing

Setting up an independent review system and taking corrective action while implementing

PROCESS STEP

FOCUS AREA

COMPETENCY

COMPETENCY DESCRIPTION Have a healthy awareness of self, perceptual framework, ability, and impact on others Establishing and maintaining meaningful relations through balanced interaction, positive expectations and actions Influencing people and situations towards win -win outcomes Systematically establishing relationships that will support life purpose and direction Identifying and implementing learning and growth interventions that will support attainment of purpose and direction

Self Awareness Emotional And Social Intelligence Relationships

Sustainable Ecology

Positive Influence Professional And Personal Relationship Building Learning And Growing Life Long Learning Orientation

6. Excercises

6.1 Mindful Living

Mindfulness is paying attention to your life, here and now, with kindness and curiosity Dr. Amy Saltzman

6.1 Mindful Living

In a randomized controlled trial conducted by Maria Napoli, Ph.D., first, second, and third graders who participated in a bi-weekly, 12-session integrative program of mindfulness and relaxation showed significant increases in attention and social skills and decreases in test anxiety and ADHD behaviours.

Napoli, M. ´Mindfulness Training for Elementary School Students: The Attention Academy´ Journal of Applied School Psychology (2005) Vol. 21(1)

6.1 Mindful Living

A study conducted by Amy Saltzman, M.D., in collaboration with the Department of Psychology at Stanford, with 4th-7th graders and their parents, showed that after 1 hour of mindfulness training for 8 consecutive weeks the children demonstrated increased ability to orient their attention, as measured by the Attention Network Task, and decreased anxiety

Goldin, P., Saltzman, A., Jha, A. ³Mindfulness Meditation Training in Families´ ABCT conference abstract (2008)

6.1 Mindful Living
Hi, today I would like to share one of my favorite places with you. It is called Still Quiet Place. It s not a place you travel to in a car, or a train, or a plane. It is a place inside you that you can find just by breathing. Let s find it now. If you feel safe, close your eyes. Whether your eyes are open or closed, take some slow deep breaths. See if you can feel a kind of warm smile in your body. Do you feel it? This is your Still Quiet Place. Take some more deep breaths, and really snuggle in. The best thing about your Still Quiet Place is that it s always inside you. And you can visit it whenever you like. It is nice to visit your Still Quiet Place and feel the love that is there. It is especially helpful to visit your Still Quiet Place if you are feeling angry, or sad, or afraid. The Still Quiet Place is a good place to talk with these feelings, and to make friends with them. When you rest in your Still Quiet Place and talk to your feelings, you may find that the feelings are not as big or as powerful as they seem. Remember you can come here whenever you want, and stay as long as you like.

6.1 Mindful Living
I. P is for pause. When you become aware that things are difficult, pause.

II. E is for exhale. When you exhale you may want to let out a sigh, or a groan, or even weep. And after you exhale you want to...Inhale. Just keep breathing. III. A is for acknowledge, accept, allow. As you continue to breathe, acknowledge the situation as it is. Your backpack with all your stuff is gone, your parents are getting divorced, your best friend is now dating the person who just became your ex Acknowledging a situation doesn t mean you are happy about it. It just means that you recognize the situation is as it is, whether you like it or not.

6.1 Mindful Living

Accept the situation, and your reaction to it. You are furious, devastated, heartbroken, jealous, or all of the above. Allow your experience. Do your best to rest in the Still Quiet Place and watch the thoughts, feelings, and body sensations. Notice when you are tempted to suppress your experience by pretending you are fine, or to create additional drama by rehashing things in your head or with friends. And allow this, too. See if you can discover a middle way: having your thoughts and feelings, without your thoughts and feelings having you and making you act in ways you may regret.

6.1 Mindful Living
IV. C is for choose. When you are ready, and this may take a few moments, days, weeks or even months, choose how you will respond. At its best, responding involves some additional Cs. Clarity: being clear about what you want, what your limits are, what you are responsible for. Courage: the courage to speak your truth, and to hear the truth of others. Compassion: compassion for yourself, for others, and for how incredibly difficult it sometimes is to be a human being, and Comedy: (Actually, I prefer the word humor, but it doesn t start with C.) It is amazing what a sense of humor and a willingness to not take ourselves too seriously can do.

6.1 Mindful Living

IV. E is for engage. After you have paused, exhaled, allowed, and chosen your response, you are ready to engage with people, with the situation, with life. Remember, if it is possible, practice with small upsets first. For extreme circumstances you may have to repeat this process over and over and receive additional support. The more you practice, the more PEACE you will have.

6.1 Mindful Living

I.

Mindfulness in Your Morning Routine Pick an activity that constitutes part of your daily morning routine, such as brushing your teeth, shaving, or having a shower. When you do it, totally focus on what you are doing: a. The body movements b. The taste, the touch c. The smell, the sight

d. The sound etc.

6.1 Mindful Living

II. Mindfulness of Domestic Chores Pick a chore that you normally try to rush through, or distract yourself from; or one for which you just grit your teeth and try to get through it . For example: ironing clothes, washing dishes, vacuuming floors, cooking dinner, making the kids lunches. Aim to do this chore as a mindfulness practice.

6.1 Mindful Living
III. Mindfulness of Pleasant Activities Pick any pleasant activity that you tend to rush through, or take for granted, or do somewhat mindlessly -- and turn it into a mindfulness practice. This might include hugging, kissing or cuddling someone you love, stroking a pet, drinking a cup of tea, eating a piece of chocolate, having a hot bath, playing a game, doing a sport, playing an instrument, etc. Engage fully in what you are doing, through all the five senses. The moment you realize you ve drifted off into your thoughts, refocus on what you are doing, here and now.

6.1 Mindful Living
IV. Mindful Listening Pick at least one person each day on whom to practice mindful listening. When they speak, be curious about the words they use, their facial expressions, their body language, the tone in their voice. See if you can read their emotional state, as well as listening intently to what they say. Attend to this person as if you are witnessing an Oscar-winning performance by the world s greatest movie star, or a revealing confession from your own personal hero: notice every little detail of their face; a. Every Flicker Of Expression In Their Eyes, Eyebrows, Forehead, Nose, And Mouth. Listen With No Agenda Other Than To Understand Their World; To Get A Sense Of What They Are Feeling And Thinking; And the moment you realize you ve drifted off into your thoughts, bring your attention back to the other person.

b.

6.1 Mindful Living
Day & Date Mindful Chore Mindful Pleasant Activity Mindful Listening Mindful Morning Routine

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