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5S BASIC TRAINING

What is 5S and why do we want to do it?


What is 5S and why do we want to do it?

5S is short for: Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize


and Sustain

5S represents 5 disciplines for maintaining a visual


workplace (visual controls and information systems).
These are foundational to Kaizen (continuous
improvement) and a manufacturing strategy based "Lean
Manufacturing" (waste removing) concepts.
5S is one of the activities that will help ensure our
company’s survival.
5S
1. Sort - All unneeded tools, parts and supplies are
removed from the area
2. Set in Order - A place for everything and everything is
in its place
3. Shine - The area is cleaned as the work is performed
4. Standardize - Cleaning and identification methods are
consistently applied
5. Sustain - 5S is a habit and is continually improved

Also - Work areas are safe and free of hazardous or


dangerous conditions
Some New Words
Red Tag-Process for tagging, removing and disposing of
items not needed in the work area.
Lean Manufacturing-concepts that seek continuous
improvement by removing waste in processes
Some Japanese words you need to know:
Kaizen-(pronounced “ki zen”) - improvement
Kaizen Event and 5S Event-Planned improvements to a
specific area or process (usually take 3 to 5 days).
5S Events focus on making 5S improvements.
Muda-(pronounced “moo da”) - waste
Gemba-(pronounced “gim ba”) - workplace
New Words - Continued
Kanban-(pronounced “kon bon”) - Pull type inventory
control system. Items are only produced to meet customer
needs. The request to produce more is signaled from an
upstream operation and/or customer orders.
Value Stream Map - A diagram of all processes needed to
make and deliver the product to the customer.

OTHER PROBLEM SOLVING TOOLS


TOC-Short for Theory of Constraints. Problem solving
and constraint management methods. Use the 5 Step form
of TOC to solve problems that you will encounter in your
continuous improvement efforts.
Some 5S Examples

After 5S - Cleaned,
organized and drawers
Before 5S labeled (less time and
frustration hunting)
5S Examples - Sort, Set in Order

See the difference?


1. Sort - All unneeded tools, parts and supplies are removed
from the area
2. Set in Order - A place for everything and everything is
in its place
5S Examples - Shine

3. Shine - The area is cleaned as the work is performed


(best) and\or there is a routine to keep the work area
clean.
5S Examples - Standardize

4. Standardize - Cleaning and identification methods


are consistently applied

Departments have weekly 5S tours


Every job has duties that use Sort, Set in Order and
Shine
We all have common duties to do our part to keep all
areas of the plant in shape - breakroom, restrooms,
locker area, parking lot, etc
5S Examples - Sustain

5. Sustain - 5S is a habit and is continually improved


5S is a simple concept with powerful results.
You will get additional information on 5S so that you
will be well equipped.
Our experience is that the more we do 5S the better the
work environment becomes: cleaner, safer, more
organized, the work is easier, less confusion and less
stress.
Use the 5S (work\home\play) - The more you use it the
easier it becomes and life just gets better and better.
The Good, Bad and the Ugly
First the Bad and the Ugly - Life Without 5S
The Good
What is Waste (Muda)?
Some of the main forms of waste are:
Overproduction
Waiting for materials, machines, or instruction
Transportation or movement
Excessive inventory
Inefficient machine processing and/or operation
Producing defects
Part or line changeover or machine setup
Inadequate housekeeping
Miscommunication or inadequate instruction
Improvement (Kaizen) Principles

Get rid of all old (false) assumptions.


Don't look for excuses, look for ways to make it
happen . . Don't worry about being perfect - even if you
only get it half right “start NOW”!
It does not cost money to do KAIZEN.
If something is wrong “Fix it NOW”.
Good ideas flow when the going gets
tough. Ask "WHY" five times - get to the root
cause. Look for wisdom from Ten people rather
than one. Never stop doing KAIZEN.
Summary

5-S is for you.


Clean-up and organize your work area every day so that
each new day is easier and safer than the day before
Share your input with your leaders so that the tools you
need will be available to you, increasing your efficiency.
Volunteer to help with the 5S tours and 5S events.

Take a good look around...Imagine zero waste/zero


confusion!
Lean and Environment Training
Modules
Version 1.0 – January 2006

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Lean and Environment Training
Module 5
6S (5S+Safety)

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Purpose of This Module

» Learn why Environment, Health, and Safety (EHS)


should be an integral part of 6S implementation

» Learn how to identify EHS issues during the Sort


process – the first pillar of 6S

» Learn how to incorporate EHS into 6S inspections


and audits of the Shine and Sustain pillars

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 18


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What is 6S?

» 6S is modeled after the 5S process improvement system


designed to reduce waste and optimize productivity in the
workplace by:
• Creating and maintaining organization and orderliness
• Using visual cues to achieve more consistent operational
results
• Reducing defects and making accidents less likely

» 6S uses the five pillars of 5S and an added pillar for Safety

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 19


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More on 6S Previous Page 19
The Six Pillars of 6S

1. Sort (Get rid of it): Separate what is needed in the


work area from what is not; eliminate the latter

2. Set in order (Organize): Organize what remains

3. Shine (Clean and Solve): Clean and inspect

4. Safety (Respect workplace and employees):


Create a safe place to work

5. Standardize (Make consistent): Standardize the


cleaning, inspection, and safety practices

6. Sustain (Keep it up): Make 6S a way of life


More on each Pillar Next Page
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Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 20 20
Relationship of the 6S Pillars

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 21


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Why Should EHS be an Integral Part of 6S?

» Expanding the scope of 6S to include EHS concerns


can help your company to:
• Reduce the chance paint, solvent, or other
chemicals expire before they can be used
• Make defects less likely, so less energy and
materials are wasted
• Avoid productivity losses from injuries and
occupational health hazards by providing clean and
accident-free work areas
• Meet or exceed your company’s environmental
performance and waste reduction goals

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 22


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TO CONSIDER

» Name at least three ways your company could use


6S to improve its environmental performance and
reduce wastes.

» What metrics could you use to track EHS


improvements from 6S activities?

» What ideas do you have for improving your work


area?

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 23


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Tools for Incorporating EHS into 6S

1. Use yellow-tagging to identify EHS issues


during the Sort process

2. Expand 6S inspections of the Shine pillar to include


EHS issues

3. Expand 6S audits performed as part of the Sustain


pillar to include EHS issues

4. Identify additional ways to implement EHS within 6S

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 24


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1. Use Yellow Tagging to Identify EHS
Issues during the Sort Process

» The objective of the Sort pillar is to identify items


that are not needed in the work area and get rid
of them

» This is done through a process called red-


tagging

» A yellow-tag strategy can be used at the same


time red-tagging takes place to identify any EHS
issues

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 25


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What is Yellow-Tagging?

» Yellow-tagging is a simple strategy used to:


• Identify environmental wastes and items that may
be harmful to human health or the environment in
the work area
• Evaluate the need for these items

• Evaluate potential alternatives for these items

• Address them appropriately


» This is a supplement to red-tagging-- key differences
include the scope of projects, criteria used, and options
for disposal or reuse
Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 26
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The Four Steps of Yellow-Tagging

1. Identify yellow-tag targets and criteria

2. Make and attach yellow tags

3. Evaluate and take care of yellow-tagged items

4. Document and share the results

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 27


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Step 1: Identify Yellow-Tag Targets…

» Two types of targets should be identified:


• The physical areas where tagging will take place
• The specific types of items that will be evaluated

» Potential items to consider yellow-tagging include:


• EHS hazards in the workplace
• Chemicals and other hazardous materials
• Environmental wastes

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 28


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…and Criteria

» After choosing targets, criteria for evaluating yellow-


tagged items needs to be agreed upon. This could
include:
• The risk of an item
• The availability of alternatives
• Opportunities for improved environmental
performance

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 29


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Step 2: Make and Attach Yellow Tags

» Can be as simple as yellow sticky notes stating the


reason for the yellow tag

» Can contain standard data that your company uses


for tracking materials

» Key is to include data that will allow your company to


evaluate performance improvements from 6S and
support your company’s overall materials tracking
system

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 30


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An Example of a Yellow Tag

C ategory 1. H ealth or safety concern


(circle one) 2. E nvironm ental concern

Item N am e
and N um ber

D escription of
Issue or Q uestion

D ivision
D ate:
R esponsible:

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 31


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Step 3: Evaluate and Address Yellow-Tagged
Items

» If you find an EHS issue during yellow-tagging, ask


“why” five times to identify the root cause of it

» Then ask “how” to address the root cause

» If an item is both unnecessary (red-tagged) and


hazardous (yellow-tagged), follow appropriate
procedures for disposal of hazardous wastes

» If items are yellow tagged but not a red tagged


(i.e.necessary but hazardous), find out if you can
avoid using those materials or if there is a less toxic
alternative

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 32


Ask “Why” 5 Times Next Page
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Step 4: Document and Share the Results

» Document necessary information from the yellow-


tagging process in a log book or other system

» Track the improvements and savings that have


resulted from yellow-tagging

» Share your results with others to show what you have


achieved and to generate ideas for future
improvements

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 33


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TO CONSIDER

» Name three types of items and three locations that


you could target for yellow-tagging at your company.

» What criteria would you use for identifying EHS


issues with yellow tags?

» Name three improvements or savings that would


result from a yellow-tagging activity at your company.

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 34


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Tools for Incorporating EHS into 6S

1. Use yellow-tagging to identify EHS issues during


the Sort process

2. Expand 6S inspections of the Shine pillar to


include EHS issues

3. Expand 6S audits performed as part of the Sustain


pillar to include EHS issues

4. Identify additional ways to implement EHS within


6S

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 35


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2. Expand 6S Inspections of the Shine Pillar
to Include EHS Issues

» Shine activities include daily cleaning and inspection by


workers in their work area

» Involve EHS personnel in developing specific inspection


checklist items for each work area

» Questions should integrate EHS management procedures


and waste identification opportunities into daily
inspections

» Particularly useful for the


10 Common Manufacturing Processes with Environmental Oppo

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 36


10 Common Processes Next Page
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Tools for Incorporating EHS into 6S

1. Use yellow-tagging to identify EHS issues during


the Sort process

2. Expand 6S inspections of the Shine pillar to


include EHS issues

3. Expand 6S audits performed as part of the


Sustain pillar to include EHS issues

4. Identify additional ways to implement EHS within


6S

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 37


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3. Expand 6S Audits Performed as Part of
the Sustain Pillar to Include EHS Issues

» Sustain activities include weekly or other periodic audits


to assess progress with 6S implementation
» Involve EHS personnel in creating plant-wide inspection
and audit questions and checklists
» Questions should ensure that environmental wastes and
risk are routinely identified, properly managed, and
eliminated where possible
» Questions can also be used to train 6S inspectors and
auditors, or to provide background for a broader rating
category

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 38


Key Questions Next Page
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Example 6S Audit Checklist with EHS Items

Document Title:

6S
Required by:
Click here for the full example checklist: http://www.epa.gov/lean/toolkit/app-e.htm
Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 39
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Tools for Incorporating EHS into 6S

1. Use yellow-tagging to identify EHS issues during


the Sort process

2. Expand 6S inspections of the Shine pillar to


include EHS issues

3. Expand 6S audits performed as part of the


Sustain pillar to include EHS issues

4. Identify additional ways to implement EHS


within 6S

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 40


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4. Identify Additional Ways to Implement
EHS within 6S

» There are many small things you can do to


incorporate EHS in the 6S process. Here are just a
few example:
• Use low-toxic paint in white or a light color - this can help
save lighting and energy costs
• Use different colored containers for hazardous waste,
recycling, and other non-hazardous wastes
• Mark aerosol cans with colored dots to indicate where to
dispose them
• Use environmentally friendly cleaning supplies

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 41


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TO CONSIDER

» How well do 6S inspections and audits assess EHS


activities and performance in your company?
» What approach might be most appropriate for
incorporating EHS considerations into 6S
assessment tools in your company?

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 42


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Reflections on Integrating EHS and 6S

» The 6S pillars work together to increase productivity,


reduce defects, make accidents less likely, save time,
and reduce costs

» When expanded to include EHS issues, they can


help reduce hazards and improve environmental
performance

» By explicitly incorporating EHS issues into all six


pillars during 6S inspections, you can eliminate more
waste and risk at your company creating a safer and
more efficient workplace

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 43


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Reflections on Integrating EHS and 6S,
Continued

» What did you learn from this training module that was
particularly useful?

» Do you need any more information to understand


how to incorporate EHS into 6S?

» Would any other tools be helpful?

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 44


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EPA Lean and Environment Training
Modules

» For more information about EPA’s Lean and


Environment Training Modules, visit:
www.epa.gov/lean

» EPA is interested in learning from organizations’


experiences with lean and environment, and
welcomes your comments on this training module

» Please contact EPA by using the form found at


http://www.epa.gov/lean/auxfiles/contact.htm

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006 | Slide 45


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More on 6S

» Based upon the five pillars (5S) of the visual


workplace in the Toyota Production System
» “Cleans up” and organizes the workplace basically in
its existing configuration
» Typically the starting point for shop-floor
DETAILS

transformation
» Provides a methodology for organizing, cleaning,
developing, and sustaining a productive work
environment
» Encourages workers to improve the physical setting
of their work and teaches them to reduce waste,
unplanned downtime, and in-process inventory

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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6S References

» Hirano, Hiroyuki. 5 Pillars of the Visual Workplace. Portland,


OR: Productivity Press, 1995.
» Peterson, Jim, Roland Smith, Ph.D. The 5S Pocket Guide.
Portland, OR: Productivity Press,1998.
» Productivity Press Development Team. 5S for Operators: 5
DETAILS

Pillars of the Visual Workplace. Portland, OR: Productivity


Press, 1996.
» Productivity Press Development Team. 5S for Safety
Implementation Toolkit: Creating Safe Conditions Using the 5S
System. Portland, OR: Productivity Press, 2000.
» Productivity Press Development Team. 5S for Safety: New Eyes
for the Shop Floor. Portland, OR: Productivity Press, 1999.

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Pillar 1: Sort (Get rid of it)

» Focuses on eliminating unnecessary items from the


workplace that are not needed for current production
operations
DETAILS

» Uses visual methods such as red-tagging to identify


these unneeded items

» Involves evaluating the necessity of each item in a


work area and dealing with it appropriately

» Can help reclaim valuable floor space and eliminate


broken tools, scrap, and excess raw material

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Pillar 2: Set in Order (Organize)

» Focuses on creating efficient and effective storage methods

» Arranges items so that they are easy to use

» Labels items so that they are easy to find and put away
DETAILS

» Can only be implemented once the first pillar, Sort, has cleared
the work area of unneeded items

» Strategies include:

• Affixing labels and placards to designate proper storage


locations
• Outlining work areas and locations
• Installing modular shelving and cabinets

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Pillar 3: Shine (Clean and solve)

» Focuses on thoroughly cleaning the work area

» Daily follow-up cleaning is necessary to sustain


improvements
DETAILS

» Enables workers to notice malfunctions in equipment


such as leaks, vibrations, breakages, and
misalignments that could lead to loss of production

» It is a good idea to establish Shine targets,


assignments, methods, and tools before beginning
the Shine pillar

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Pillar 4: Safety (Respect workplace and
employee)
» Focuses on eliminating hazards and creating a safe
environment to work

» Once the workplace has been organized and


cleaned, potential dangers become easier to
DETAILS

recognize

» A separate “safety sweep” should be performed to


identify, label, and deal with hazards

» Safety measures can also be implemented in


conjunction with strategies in the other five pillars

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Pillar 5: Standardize (Make consistent)

» Used to maintain the first three pillars


» Focuses on creating a consistent approach with which tasks and
procedures are performed
» The first step is to assign 6S job responsibilities and integrate 6S
duties into regular work duties using tools such as:
• job cycle charts
DETAILS

• visual cues (e.g., signs, placards, display scoreboards)


• checklists
» The next step is to prevent:
• accumulation of unneeded items
• procedures from breaking down
• equipment and materials from getting dirty

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Pillar 6: Sustain (Keep it up)

» Makes a habit of properly maintaining correct procedures


» Often the most difficult pillar to implement and achieve
» Sustain focuses on defining a new status quo and standard of workplace
organization
» Without the Sustain pillar, the achievements of the other pillars will not last
long
DETAILS

» Tools for sustaining 6S include:


• signs and posters
• newsletters
• pocket manuals
• team and management check-ins
• performance reviews
• department tours

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Ask “Why” Five Times1

» Why are we using so much water?


The parts need to be cleaned before painting.
» Why do the parts need to be cleaned?
The parts fail quality checks if they aren’t cleaned before being painted.
» Why do the parts fail quality checks?
The paint doesn’t adhere when part surfaces are not prepared properly.
DETAILS

» Why do the surfaces of the part need to be prepared?


The surfaces get contaminated with oils used in the previous process.
» Why are oils used in the previous process?
The oils are used to prevent corrosion during storage.
1
Based on an example from Robert B. Pojasek, “Asking ‘Why’ Five Times,” Environmental Quality Management (Autumn 2000): 83.

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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10 Common Manufacturing Processes with
Environmental Opportunities

1. Metal casting 6. Welding


2. Chemical and heat 7. Metal finishing and
treatment of materials plating
3. Metal fabrication and 8. Painting and coating
DETAILS

machining 9. Waste management


4. Cleaning and surface 10. Chemical and hazardous
preparation materials management
5. Bonding and sealing

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Key 6S Inspection and Audit Questions for
Eliminating Environmental Waste and Risk
» Sort (Get rid of it)
• Are potentially risky items and environmental
wastes yellow-tagged?
• Are all red-tagged items being disposed of
DETAILS

properly, including those that must be managed


as hazardous or universal wastes?

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Key 6S Inspection and Audit Questions for
Eliminating Environmental Waste and Risk
» Set in Order (Organize)
• Are material containers clean, stored off the floor,
closed, properly stacked, and stored/staged in the
proper areas?
• Are all containers with chemicals or wastes
DETAILS

covered or sealed when not in use?


• Are all containers with materials, chemicals,
and/or wastes properly labeled?
• Are initial accumulation points for hazardous
waste clean and organized, and do they have
effective visual controls?

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Key 6S Inspection and Audit Questions for
Eliminating Environmental Waste and Risk
» Shine (Clean and Solve)
• Are any leaks evident from equipment, piping, tanks,
exhaust lines, or other areas in the workplace?
• Is air quality in the work area good, and free of dust, odors,
and fumes? Are ventilation systems clean and
DETAILS

unobstructed?
• Are all drains in good condition, free flowing, unobstructed
and properly labeled?
• Are exterior locations near storm water drains and storm
water retention areas free from garbage and debris?
• Are garbage and recyclables collected and sorted
correctly? Are recycling containers and bins free from
extraneous materials?

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Key 6S Inspection and Audit Questions for
Eliminating Environmental Waste and Risk

» Safety (Respect workplace and employee)


• Are employees using the proper protective
equipment when handling chemicals and
hazardous waste?
DETAILS

• Are lockout and emergency procedures posted


and easily accessible?

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Key 6S Inspection and Audit Questions for
Eliminating Environmental Waste and Risk
» Standardize (Make consistent)
• Are standard work procedures documented and
available for the area?
• Are EHS management activities and procedures
DETAILS

relevant to the work area integrated into standard


work?

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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Key 6S Inspection and Audit Questions for
Eliminating Environmental Waste and Risk
» Sustain (Keep it up)
• Are standard work procedures being followed?
• Are workers in the area aware of chemical
hazards associated with standard work tasks?
DETAILS

Lean and Environment Toolkit | January 2006


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