Culture, Etiquettes and Customs Around Countries

´Different fields, different grasshoppers; different seas, different fishµ

Key Concept of Saudi Arabian Culture
Islam
‡ Islam is practised by all Saudis and governs their personal, political, economic and legal lives. ‡ Majority of Arab's society are Muslims. There are only about 5% of Arabs are non-Muslims.

Family Values
‡ The family and tribe are the basis of the social structure. ‡ As is seen in their naming conventions, Saudis are cognizant of their heritage, their clan, and their extended family, as well as their nuclear family. ‡ Saudis take their responsibilities to their family quite seriously. ‡ Families tend to be large and the extended family is quite close. ‡ The individual derives a social network and assistance in times of need from the family. ‡ Nepotism is considered a good thing, since it implies that employing people one knows and trusts is of primary importance.

Etiq ette tte

stoms i

i

Touch, p ss or ccept nything only with your right h nd Men c n sh ke h nd while greeting with le, but never fe le, unless she with offers her h nd first Wo n should dress in nner ccept ble to Ar bs (using b y , loose, nd covers the neck, r s nd legs). Men should respect the priv cy nd protected role of Ar b wo n

Do not turn your b ck on so eone who is spe king to you. Men should never visit, ttend or go to pl ces th t re rked 'For L dies Only¶ An Ar b's en y not sk n Ar b direct question bout his wife or other fe le e bers of his f ily Wo n y not we r tight or ny other i polite cloths

Key Concept of Japan Culture
Wa
Kao (Face)

The most valued principle still alive in Japanese society today is the concept of 'wa', or 'harmony'. In business terms, 'wa' is reflected in the avoidance of self-assertion and individualism and the preservation of good relationships despite differences in opinion.

O oiyari (Loyalty)

Kaizen

Key Concept of Japan Culture
Wa (Har ony)

Kao
O oiyari (Loyalty)

Face is a mark of personal pride and forms the basis of an individual's reputation and social status. Preservation of face comes through avoiding confrontations and direct criticism wherever possible. In Japan, causing someone to lose face can be disastrous for business relationships.

Kaizen

Key Concept of Japan Culture
Wa (Har ony)

Kao (Face)

Closely linked to the concepts of 'wa' and 'kao', 'omoiyari' relates to the sense of empathy and loyalty encouraged in Japanese society and practiced in Japanese business culture. In literal terms it means "to imagine another's feelings", therefore building a strong relationship based on trust and mutual feeling is vital for business success in Japan.

Omoiyari

Kaizen

Key Concept of Japan Culture
Wa (Har ony)

Kao (Face)

Kaizen means "improvement", or "change for the better . It is a Japanese workplace philosophy which focuses on making continuous small improvements which keep a business at the top of its field.

O oiyari (Loyalty)

Kaizen

Business Card Exchange of Gifts Sense of Time Communication

Key Concept of American Culture

Diversity

Egalitarianism

LowContext Culture

Individualism

A erica is ulti ately a nation of i igrants and as a result is a cultural ix in every sense of the word.

Key Concept of American Culture

Diversity

Egalitarianism

LowContext Culture

Individualism

Des ite of ma ifferences it in American societ , t ere is a collective understanding of t e notion of equalit t at underlines many social relations i s in t e US. Americans elieve in having equal rights, equal social obligations, and equal opportunities based on the concept of individual merit, instead of status, age or ealth.

Key Concept of American Culture

Diversity

Egalitarianism

LowContext Culture

Individualism

Americans are direct and tas centred, thus the primary purpose of communication is to exchange information, facts, and opinions. In the US, conflict is dealt ith directly and openly, and for this reason, Americans ill not hesitate to say ´noµ or criticise others in public.

Key Concept of American Culture

Diversity

Egalitarianism

LowContext Culture

Individualism

American culture emphasises individual initiative and personal achievement. Independence and self-reliance are highly valued and also extends to the wor place where business is frequently carried out autonomously.

Eti uettes and Customs in US
Address your A erican business colleagues with a title, such as ´Drµ, ´Msµ, or ´Mrµ, and their last name when meeting someone for the first time. Speak clearly and in a straightforward manner. Say ´pleaseµ and ´thank youµ to everyone for even the smallest kindness. Be punctual! Make a preliminary small talk with your Americans counterparts at the beginning of a business meeting. DON·T make any physical contact more than a firm and brief handshake when greeting your American counterpart for the first time. DON·T be afraid to be more direct and honest than you are used to. DON·T be offended or surprised if your American colleagues cannot accept a gift.

France has a population of approximately 58 million people. France does not have an official religion. France is home to approximately 4.5 million foreigners. Education is of great importance to the French.

Key oncept of Fr nce ulture lture
Centralisation ‡ In the world of French business, centralisation exists in the concentrated authority that generally lies with one individual. Individualism and Individuality ‡ France·s distinguished individuality is an importantcultural characteristic that describes the French passion for uniqueness and freedom of opinion, both in society and in business. ‡ However, individuality should not be confused with the term individualism, which is equally essential in France, but refers to having a separate but equal sense of place in society. Uncertainty Avoidance ‡ The French have a low tolerance for uncertainty and ambiguity

Eti uettes and Customs in rance
DOs
Learn a few basic rench phrases
your effort will not go unnoticed

DON·Ts
Gesture
Chew gum in public, hand in pocket, snap finger, etc

Maintain air of formality
French is all about formality

Business gift
Give a business gift on a first

Maintain eye contact
as long as it isn·t too obtrusive

meeting

Knowledge speak
little knowledge is dangerous in French

Lunches
lunch is one of the best places to forge business relationship

Hierarchy rules using first name, disrespect privacy, etc Punctuality alert

Consider time
be prepare to a long wait before you got the answer

Key oncept of outh African ulture

Time

Family

ommunication tyle

The whole family is the important thing for the individual·s existence to influence their values and behaviour.

Key oncept of outh African ulture

Time

Family

ommunication tyle

The concept of time and the approach taken towards it differs between the white and black cultures living in South Africa.

Key oncept of outh African ulture

Time

Family

ommunication tyle

English-speaking South Africans Forthright and honest

Eti uettes and Customs in South Africa
DO·S DO include deadline dates in contracts, as the South African approach to deadlines is particularly casual and firm commitments are not often made DONT·S DON·T raise your voice or interrupt whilst your South African counterparts are speaking. Both actions lack the personal approach to a business relationship and therefore may be interpreted as an insult. DON·T be surprised if your South African business colleagues ask what may seem to be personal questions about your way of life after a relatively brief period of time. Characteristically, South Aficans tend to be warm and friendly people DON·T show impatience towards decision making. Forcing deadlines or rushing deals may prove counterproductive since the pace of business in South Africa is reasonably slow and protracted.

DO maintain eye-contact at all times, especially when shaking hands with your South African business colleagues. This is an essential part of developing trust

DO dress conservatively, particularly for initial meetings with new business associates

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