Submitted to:- Smriti ma¶am

Submitted by:- Prashant Mehta Class:-7th C Roll no.:-38

SWAMI SANT DASS PUBLIC SCHOOL

Endangered species
An endangered species is a population of organisms which is at risk of becoming extinct because it is either few in numbers, or threatened by changing environmental or predation parameters. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has calculated the percentage of endangered species as 40 percent of all organisms based on the sample of species that have been evaluated through 2006. Many nations have laws offering protection to conservation reliant species: for example, forbidding hunting, restricting land development or creating preserves. Only a few of the many species at risk of extinction actually make it to the lists and obtain legal protection like Pandas. Many more species become extinct, or potentially will become extinct, without gaining public notice.

Ganges shark
The Ganges shark (Glyphis gangeticus) is a rare species of requiem shark found in the Ganges River of India. It should not be confused with the Bull shark, which also inhabits the Ganges River and is sometimes incorrectly referred to as the Ganges shark

Appearance
In its external appearance, G. gangeticus is a typical requiem shark. It is stocky, with a broadly rounded snout and small eyes. The first dorsal fin is over the last third of the pectoral fins, with a free rear tip that is well in front of the pelvic fins. The second dorsal fin is much smaller than the first, but is still relatively large. The anal fin is slightly smaller than the second dorsal fin. The pectoral fins are broad and falcate. A longitudinal upper precaudal pit is present, but the interdorsal ridge is absent. The shark tends to have a uniform gray to brownish coloration, with no discernible pattern or markings.

Quiz about Ganges shark Q1. What is the scientific name of Ganges shark ? Ans1. Glyphis gangeticus Q2. Ganges shark has which appearance ? Ans2. It has external appearance. Q3. Where Ganges shark tends ? Ans3. The shark tends to have a
uniform gray to brownish coloration, with no discernible pattern or markings.

Q4. Which fin is slightly smaller than the second dorsal fin ? Ans4. The anal fin is slightly smaller than the second dorsal fin.

Himalayan Wolf The terms Himalayan wolf and Canis himalayensis have been suggested by several Indian biologists for recognition as a critically endangered canid species, distinct from Canis lupus. In its morphological features, social and reproductive behavior, the Himalayan wolf resembles the Tibetan wolf, Canis lupus chanco. However, the IUCN Wolf Specialist Group has not taken a position regarding this issue. The editors of Mammal Species of the World consider the small population to be Tibetan wolves a subspecies of the gray wolf. Distribution Kalpa, Himachal Pradesh The Himalayan wolf may represent an ancient isolated line of wolves consisting of a small population of about 350 animals. They inhabit an area of 70,000 km 2 in the trans-Himalayan region of Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir in northern India, and are adapted to the cold environment. .

Quiz about Himalayan Wolf Q1. What is the scientific name of Himalayan wolf? Ans1. The scientific name of Himalayan wolf is Canis himalayensis. Q2. Which area they inhabit? Ans2. They inhabit an area of 70,000 km 2 in the transHimalayan region of Himachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir in northern India, and are adapted to the cold environment. Q3. What happened in 2004? Ans3. In 2004, a group of 33 Himalayan wolves were spotted in the Spiti Valley in the northeastern part of Himachal Pradesh.

Indian Vulture
The Indian Vulture (Gyps indicus) is an Old World vulture and is closely related to the Griffon Vulture, G. fulvus. It breeds mainly on crags in the hills of Sind in Pakistan, central and peninsular India. The birds in the northern part of its range once considered a subspecies are now considered a separate species, the Slenderbilled Vulture Gyps tenuirostris. These were lumped together under the name Long-billed Vulture. The species breeds mainly on cliffs, but is known to use trees to nest in Rajasthan. Like other vultures it is a scavenger, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals which it finds by soaring over savannah and around human habitation. They often move in flocks. The Long-billed Vulture is a typical vulture, with a bald head, very broad wings and short tail feathers. It is smaller and less heavily-built than the Eurasian Griffon, usually weighing between 5.5 and 6.3 kg (12±13.9 lbs) and measuring 80±100 cm (32±40 in) long and 205 to 229 cm (81±91 in) across the wings. It is distinguished from that species by its less buff body and wing coverts. It also lacks the whitish median covert bar shown by Griffon.

Quiz about Indian vulture Q1. What is the scientific name of Indian vulture? Ans1. The scientific name of Indian vulture is gyps indicus. Q2. Who is the Indian vulture? Ans2. The Indian vulture is an Old World vulture and is closely related to the Griffon Vulture, G. fulvus. It breeds mainly on crags in the hills of Sind in Pakistan. Q3. How much Indian vulture have weight? Ans3. Indian vulture have weight between 5.5 and 6.3 kg.

Namdapha flying squirrel
The Namdapha Flying Squirrel (Biswamoyopterus biswasi), the sole species placed in the genus Biswamoyopterus, is an arboreal, nocturnal flying squirrel endemic to India, and is listed as a critically endangered species due to habitat loss. First collected in Deban (on 27 April 1981), no population estimates are available for B. biswasi, but the known habitat is tall Mesua ferrea jungles, often on hill slopes in the catchments area of Noa Dihing river (particularly on the western slope of Patkoi range) in North eastern India .The Namdapha Flying Squirrel, also known as the Biswamoyopterus Biswasi, is becoming extinct because it is losing its habitat and is prey for other animals. The Namdapha Flying Squirrel is similar to other flying squirrels except of the color and other features. Like other flying squirrels, the most distinctive feature of this species is the muscular membrane that extends along the sides of the body, from the front legs to the back legs. This membrane is like a parachute because when the animal jumps form a tree to another tree, it is able to steer by moving its legs and tail and controlling the membrane. The Namdapha Flying Squirrel is found mostly in India and Asia.

Quiz about Namdapha flying squirrel Q1. What is the scientific name of Namdapha flying squirrel? Ans1. The scientific name of namdapha flying squirrel is Biswamoyopterus biswasi. Q2. Where it was collected first time? Ans2. It was collected in Deban first time. Q3. On which date it was collected ? Ans3. On 27 April 1981 it was collected. Q4. It is mostly found in ? Ans4. It is mostly found in India and Asia.

Salim ali fruit bat
Salim Ali's fruit bat (Latidens salimalii) is a rare megabat species in the monotypic genus Latidens. It was first collected by Angus Hutton, a planter and naturalist in the High Wavy Mountains in the western ghats of Theni district, Tamil nadu in South India in 1948. It was originally misidentified as a short-nosed fruit bat (Cynopterus) but later identified by Kitti Thonglongya as a new species and was named after Indian ornithologist Salim Ali in 1972. This bat is listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN.

Description
It is medium sized and has no external tail. Ears are oval with rounded tips. The head is covered by blackish brown fur and the wing is light brown in colour and the under parts are light grey-brown with the brown wing membrane (Patagium) hairless. It has fifteen palatal ridges. The beak rostrum is long and narrow and the palate is very long especially post dental portion. Post orbital foramina are absent. Incisors 1 pair and peg like, cheek teeth brad. First premolars are very small and slightly exceeds the incisors in the crown area. Body length is 10 cm, hind feet 0.8-1.5 cm, forearm 6.6 cm. It was observed that these bats eat fresh fruits of, Elaeocarpus oblongus (Rudraksh or bead tree) and the figs:

Quiz about salim ali fruit bat Q1. What is the scientific name of salim ali fruit bat ? Ans1. The scientific name of salim ali fruit bat is latidens salimalii. Q2. From which it was collected and on which date ? Ans2. It was first collected by Angus Hutton, a planter and naturalist in the High Wavy Mountains in the western ghats of Theni district, Tamil nadu in South India in 1948. Q3. How much its size ? Ans3. It is medium sized and has no external tail.

ACTION PLAN
1. Stop hunting for pleasure. 2. Plant more trees. 3. Build a bird house and feed local birds. 4. Govt. should come forward to create more safe zones and national parks to protect endangered species. 5. Minimize the use of herbicides and pesticides. 6. Protect wild life habitat. 7. Educate people about the importance of wild life. 8. Boycott fur coats, medicines and other products made from rare animals. 9. Timely survey to check the number of members of a particular species. 10.Apply artificial methods to increase their number.

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