The Central Dogma Proposed by Francis Crick in 1958 to describe the flow  of information in a cell.

DNA

Information stored in DNA is transferred residue­by­residue to RNA which in turn transfers the  information residue­by­residue to protein. The Central Dogma was proposed by Crick to help   scientists think about molecular biology.  It has  undergone numerous revisions in the past 45 years.    

RNA

Protein    

The Central Dogma

DNA

deoxyribonucleic acid

RNA

Protein    

DNA

monophosphate
α

base: thymine (pyrimidine) sugar: 2’­deoxyribose

5’ 4’ 3’ 1’ 2’

(5’ to 3’)

3’ linkage

5’ linkage    

base:adenine (purine) no 2’­hydroxyl

DNA: terminology
base

sugar

nucleoside

base phosphate(s) sugar

 

  nucleotides (nucleoside mono­, di­, and triphosphates)

DNA: structure
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. DNA is double stranded DNA strands are antiparallel G­C pairs have 3 hydrogen bonds A­T pairs have 2 hydrogen bonds One strand is the complement of the other Major and minor grooves present different surfaces Cellular DNA is almost exclusively B­DNA B­DNA has ~10.5 bp/turn of the helix 

 

 

The Central Dogma

DNA

RNA

ribonucleic acid

Protein    

RNA: terminology

Base

Nucleoside (RNA) Adenosine Guanosine

Deoxynucleoside (DNA) Deoxyadenosine Deoxyguanosine Deoxycytidine (not usually found) (Deoxy)thymidine

base

Adenine Guanine

Cytosine Cytidine

sugar

Uracil Thymine

Uridine (not usually found)

nucleoside

 

 

RNA: Structure

1. 2. 3. 4.
 

RNA can be single or double stranded G­C pairs have 3 hydrogen bonds A­U pairs have 2 hydrogen bonds Single­stranded, double­stranded, and loop RNA present different surfaces 
 

The Central Dogma

DNA

RNA

Protein    

Protein

 

 

carboxyl group amino group

20 amino acids

 

 

Peptide bond formation

 

 

Protein structure

 

α­helix

 

antiparallel β­sheet

The Central Dogma
Replication
duplication of DNA using DNA as the template
DNA

(gene)

ATGAGTAACGCG TACTCATTGCGC

ATGAGTAACGCG TACTCATTGCGC (nontemplate, antisense) ATGAGTAACGCG (template, sense) TACTCATTGCGC

+

Transcription

synthesis of RNA using DNA as the template
RNA

(mRNA) AUGAGUAACGCG codon tRNA ribosomes

Translation

(protein) MetSerAsnAla synthesis of proteins using RNA as the template

Protein    

The Central Dogma
Replication    Repair and recombination 
• DNA pol α and δ

DNA

2.      DNA pol β and ε 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. RNA pol I­ribosomal RNA (rRNA) RNA pol II­messenger RNA (mRNA) RNA pol III­5S rRNA, snRNA, tRNA mRNA splicing rRNA and tRNA processing capping and polyadenylation

Transcription RNA processing

RNA

Translation Post­translational modification
 

Protein  

1. 2. 3.

phosphorylation methylation ubiquitination

Compartmentalization of processes      (thus, transport is important)

replication

 

 

Regulation occurs at each step of a process  3. Initiation (starting) ­what is the signal that initiates the process?

­what are the factors involved in initiation (cis­and trans­acting)? 

2.    Elongation (continuation) ­how is the process maintained with high fidelity once initiated? 3.    Termination (ending) ­what is the signal that stops the process?

­what are the factors involved in elongation (cis­ and trans­acting)? 

­what are the factors involved in termination (cis­ and trans­acting)?

Other general regulatory considerations 3. 2.   3. 4. How is the rate of a process regulated? How are the steps regulated in a cell, tissue, or gene­specific manner? Stability of biomolecules Cellular localization of biomolecules

 

 

Exceptions to the Central Dogma
Nobel Prizes Epigenetic marks, such as patterns of DNA methylation, can be inherited and provide information other than the DNA sequence   retroviruses use reverse transcriptase to replicate their genome (David Baltimore and Howard Temin)   RNA viruses

DNA

mRNA introns (splicing) (Philip Sharp and Richard Roberts) RNA editing (deamination of cytosine RNA to yield uracil in mRNA) RNA interference (RNAi) a mechanism of post­transcriptional gene silencing  utilizing double­stranded RNA RNAs (ribozymes) can catalyze an enzymatic reaction (Thomas Cech and Sidney Altman)
 

Prions are heritable proteins responsible for neurological infectious diseases (e.g. scrapie and mad cow)         (Stanley Pruisner) 

Protein  

Differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic gene expression
1.  In eukaryotes, one mRNA = one protein.       (in bacteria, one mRNA can be polycistronic, or code for several proteins).  2.  DNA in eukaryotes forms a stable, compacted complex with histones.        (in bacteria, the DNA is not in a permanently condensed state)  3.  Eukaryotic DNA contains large regions of repetitive DNA.      (in bacteria, DNA rarely contains any "extra" DNA)  4.  Much of eukaryotic DNA does not code for proteins (~98% is non­coding in humans)      (in bacteria, often more than 95% of the genome codes for proteins)  5.  Sometimes, eukaryotes can use controlled gene rearrangement for increasing the      number of specific genes.        (in bacteria, this happens rarely) 6.  Eukaryotic genes are split into exons and introns.      (in bacteria, genes are almost never split)  7.  In eukaryotes, mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and then processed and      exported to the cytoplasm.      (in bacteria, transcription and translation can take place simultaneously off the      same piece of DNA)
   

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful