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Module 5 Planning Application Servers

Module Overview
Overview of Application Servers Supporting Web-Based Applications Supporting SQL Server Databases Deploying Client Applications Planning Terminal Services

Lesson 1: Overview of Application Servers


What Is an Application Server? Types of Authentication for Traditional Applications Considerations for Supporting Traditional Applications Considerations for Web-Based Applications Windows Server 2008 Features and Roles That Support

Application Servers

Considerations for Maintaining Application Servers

What Is an Application Server?


A server that runs user applications

Traditional applications Web-based applications

Types of Authentication for Traditional Applications


The types of authentication are:

Active Directory LDAP Internal

Considerations for Supporting Traditional Applications


Considerations

Simplify user logons by using Active Directory or LDAP authentication It may be difficult to update client software for traditional applications Traditional applications often have difficulty through firewalls Traditional applications are difficult to access over the Internet Some traditional applications require NetBIOS

Considerations for Web-Based Applications


Considerations

They are well suited for remote access They require no additional infrastructure They are easier to update than traditional applications

Windows Server 2008 Features and Roles That Support Application Servers
The features are:

.NET Framework 3.0 features Desktop Experience feature Windows PowerShell feature Application Server role Web Server (IIS) role Windows SharePoint Services 3.0

Considerations for Maintaining Application Servers


Considerations
Define a maintenance window Understand the business impact of an application server Carefully plan updates and version upgrades to increase availability Before implementing system changes, understand the ramifications

Lesson 2: Supporting Web-Based Applications


Authentication Considerations for Web-Based Applications What Is SSL? Considerations for Selecting an SSL Certificate Considerations for Dynamic Web Content Considerations for IIS Applications Demonstration: Configuring IIS

Authentication Considerations for Web-Based Applications


Considerations
Basic authentication has the best compatibility Basic authentication is secure when used with SSL Windows Integrated authentication is useful on internal networks Digest authentication is seldom used Certificate authentication is very secure but complex to implement Multi-factor authentication enhances security

What Is SSL?
Used to encrypt communication between a Web browser and a Web server

1. Client sends request 2. Server responds with public key 3. Client generates symmetrical key 4. Client encrypts symmetrical key by using server public key and sends to server 5. Server decrypts symmetrical key by using private key 6. Symmetrical key is used to secure communication

Considerations for Selecting an SSL Certificate


Considerations

Internal certificates are not trusted by external clients External certificate costs vary, but functionality is the same The subject name must match the DNS name of the server

Considerations for Dynamic Web Content


Considerations

Enable only the required methods of dynamic content Dynamic content requires processing and memory resources Dynamic content introduces security risks Default scripts should be removed

Considerations for IIS Applications


Considerations
Control application pool permissions by using the identity Use separate application pools to isolate applications Separate application pools may prevent data sharing between applications Application pool recycling automatically restarts unstable applications

Demonstration: Configuring IIS


In this demonstration, you will see how to:
Configure an SSL certificate Create an application pool Create an application

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Lesson 3: Supporting SQL Server Databases


Why Do Administrators Need to Understand Databases? What Is SQL Server? SQL Server Editions SQL Server Authentication Options Demonstration: SQL Server Management Tools How SQL Server Uses Transaction Logs Backup and Restore Options for SQL Server Support Considerations for SQL Server

Why Do Administrators Need to Understand Databases?


Databases are used to store application data and configuration information
Databases have unique backup requirements Transaction logs grow over time Databases have an internal security system Administrators do not need to understand the data in a database Database selection is dictated by the application vendor

What Is SQL Server?


A database that can be used as a back end for storing application data
Applications use SQL queries Reporting Services is required for some applications There is a single instance by default Each instance can have multiple databases Clients use ODBC connections to find a database

SQL Server Editions


SQL Server 2008 Editions
Free Editions: Express 4 GB size limit Compact For mobile devices Core Editions: Standard For departmental applications Enterprise Full featured for data mining and data warehousing Specialized Editions: Workgroup Data synchronization for remote offices Web Licensing for Internet facing applications Developer Enterprise features for development only

SQL Server Authentication Options

Windows Authentication Permissions linked to Active Directory or local Windows accounts Simplifies management Simplifies user logon

Mixed Authentication Permissions linked to Active Directory or local Windows accounts Also allows local SQL users Allows for administrative flexibility Enables sa and sysadmin

Demonstration: SQL Server Management Tools


In this demonstration, you will see how to:
Use SQL Server Management Studio

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How SQL Server Uses Transaction Logs

Transactions are written to log before the database Transaction logs are used to prevent database corruption

Recovery models Simple recovery Full recovery Bulk-logged recovery

Backup and Restore Options for SQL Server

Full Backup Backs up transaction log and database Truncates transaction log Incremental Backup Backs up only transaction log Truncates transaction log Differential Backup Backs up only transaction log Does not truncate transaction log

Support Considerations for SQL Server


Considerations

The transaction log and database files never shrink automatically Use full recovery mode to enhance recoverability Store transaction logs and database files on separate disks Use incremental backups only if you are sure your backups are reliable Use a maintenance plan to automatically back up databases Back up to disk in SQL Server if your backup software does not have a SQL Server agent Consider all parts of an application when backing up

Lesson 4: Deploying Client Applications


Considerations for Application Compatibility Application Deployment Methods Demonstration: Deploying an Application by Using Group

Policy

Considerations for Application Compatibility


Considerations

Verify compatibility with the software vendor Microsoft provides a list of compatible applications Use ACT to identify and resolve compatibility issues SUA can identify and resolve some issues with User Account Control

Application Deployment Methods


The methods for deploying applications are:
Inclusion in an operating system image Group Policy System Center Essentials System Center Configuration Manager App-V Terminal Services

Demonstration: Deploying an Application by Using Group Policy


In this demonstration, you see how to:
Use Group Policy to deploy an application

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Lesson 5: Planning Terminal Services


What Is Terminal Services? New Terminal Services Features in Windows Server 2008 Considerations for Terminal Services Licensing Considerations for Using Terminal Services

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What Is Terminal Services?


A server role that runs applications centrally on a server

Server sends screen draw commands to client Very low network utilization Can use Remote Desktop or a Windows terminal File and printer redirection are possible Can remotely access a desktop or just an application

New Terminal Services Features in Windows Server 2008

Single sign-on Simplifies logon on internal networks Easy Print Print jobs are rendered locally TS RemoteApp Allows remote control of a single application TS Web Access Begin Terminal Services sessions from a Web page TS Gateway Tunnels RDP traffic in HTTPS

Considerations for Terminal Services Licensing

Considerations: Terminal Services CALs must be purchased A single server can use only device or user CALs Application licensing must be planned

Considerations for Using Terminal Services

TS improves performance over a WAN for remote offices TS has better performance than a VPN for roaming users TS simplifies client software management of LOB applications Use RemoteApp to simplify user access to TS applications Use the Web Access Gateway and TS Web Access to provide access to application over the Internet Allow remote users to connect to their own desktop Loss of a Terminal Server affects many users

Lab: Planning Application Servers


Exercise 1: Creating a Plan for Application Servers Exercise 2: Implementing Windows SharePoint Services Exercise 3: Implementing Terminal Services

Logon information

Virtual machine User name Password

6430B-SEA-DC1 6430B-SEA-CL1 Adatum\Administrator Pa$$w0rd

Estimated time: 60 minutes

Lab Scenario
Adatum has identified a need for a Web-based

collaboration system and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 has been selected. You need install Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 and review the configuration. maintenance, you are deploying the application on a Terminal Server by using RemoteApp.

A new financial application is being purchased. To simplify

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Module Review and Takeaways


Review Questions