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Personality and Consumer Behavior

What Is the Personality Trait Characterizing the Consumers to Whom This Ad Appeals?

Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

Chapter Five Slide

2

Enthusiastic or Extremely Involved Collectors

Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

Chapter Five Slide

3

Personality and The Nature of Personality
• The inner psychological characteristics that both determine and reflect how a person responds to his or her environment • The Nature of Personality:
– Personality reflects individual differences – Personality is consistent and enduring – Personality can change

Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall

Chapter Five Slide

4

Discussion Questions
• How would you describe your personality? • How does it influence products that you purchase?
Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 5

Inc.Theories of Personality • Freudian theory – Unconscious needs or drives are at the heart of human motivation • Neo-Freudian personality theory – Social relationships are fundamental to the formation and development of personality • Trait theory – Quantitative approach to personality as a set of psychological traits Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 6 .

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 7 . Inc.Freudian Theory • Id – Warehouse of primitive or instinctual needs for which individual seeks immediate satisfaction • Superego – Individual’s internal expression of society’s moral and ethical codes of conduct • Ego – Individual’s conscious control that balances the demands of the id and superego Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

may over commit to projects. high achiever. intuitive. high expectations. fair. successful. plans ahead. prefers time alone. punctual. proper. principled. loves order. impatient with less than the best. Conscientious. Chapter Five Slide 8 Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. may appear rigid but has great integrity. flirtatious. contemplative. easily bored with same old routine. shy. conservative. Perfectionist.1 (excerpt) Snack Foods Personality Traits Potato chips Tortilla chips Pretzels Snack crackers Cheese curls Ambitious. Rational. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall . Lively. logical.Snack Foods and Personality Traits Table 5. responsible.

Inc.How Does This Marketing Message Apply the Notion of the Id? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 9 .

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 10 .It Captures Some of the Mystery and The Excitement Associated With the “Forces” of Primitive Drives. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc.

Neo-Freudian Personality Theory • Social relationships are fundamental to personality • Alfred Adler: – Style of life – Feelings of inferiority • Harry Stack Sullivan – We establish relationships with others to reduce tensions • Karen Horney’s three personality groups – Compliant: move toward others – Aggressive: move against others – Detached: move away from others Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 11 . Inc.

Why Is Appealing to an Aggressive Consumer a Logical Position for This Product? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 12 .

Because its Consumer Seeks to Excel and Achieve Recognition Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 13 . Inc.

relatively enduring way in which one individual differs from another • Personality is linked to broad product categories and NOT specific brands Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.Trait Theory • Focus on measurement of personality in terms of traits • Trait . publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 14 . Inc.any distinguishing.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 15 .2 (excerpt) • Chicken Noodle Soup Lovers – – – – – – – – – – Watch a lot of TV Are family oriented Have a great sense of humor Are outgoing and loyal Like daytime talk shows Most likely to go to church Passionate about reading Love pets Like meeting people for coffee Aren’t usually the life of the party • Vegetable/Minestrone Soup Lovers – Enjoy the outdoors – Usually game for trying new things – Spend more money than any other group dining in fancy restaurants – Likely to be physically fit – Gardening is often a favorite hobby • Tomato Soup Lovers Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.Soup and Soup Lover’s Traits Table 5. Inc.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 16 . Inc.Personality and Understanding Consumer Behavior Consumer innovativeness Dogmatism Social character Need for uniqueness Optimum stimulation level Varietynovelty seeking Sensation seeking Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 17 .Consumer Innovativeness • Willingness to innovate • Further broken down for hi-tech products – Global innovativeness – Domain-specific innovativeness – Innovative behavior Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc.

In general. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 18 . 2. I am the last in my circle of friends to know the titles of the latest rock albums. 2.Consumer Motivation Scales Table 5. Compared to my friends. Inc.3 (excerpt) A “GENERAL” CONSUMER INNOVATIVENESS SCALE 1. I would rather stick to a brand I usually buy than try something I am not very sure of. I own few rock albums. I feel it is safer to order dishes I am familiar with. A DOMAIN-SPECIFIC CONSUMER INNOVATIVENESS SCALE 1. When I go to a restaurant.

Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 19 .Dogmatism • A personality trait that reflects the degree of rigidity a person displays toward the unfamiliar and toward information that is contrary to his or her own established beliefs Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 20 .Personality and Understanding Consumer Behavior • Ranges on a continuum for inner-directedness to other-directedness • Inner-directedness – rely on own values when evaluating products – Innovators • Other-directedness – look to others – less likely to be innovators Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 21 .How Does This Ad Target the InnerDirected Outdoors Person? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc.

A Sole Person is Experiencing the Joys and Adventure of the Wilderness Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 22 .

Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 23 .Need for Uniqueness • Consumers who avoid conforming to expectations or standards of others Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.Optimum Stimulation Level • A personality trait that measures the level or amount of novelty or complexity that individuals seek in their personal experiences • High OSL consumers tend to accept risky and novel products more readily than low OSL consumers. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 24 .

Inc. And the willingness to take social and physical risks for the sensations. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.Sensation Seeking • The need for varied. and complex sensations and experience. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 25 . novel.

Variety-Novelty Seeking • Measures a consumer’s degree of variety seeking • Examples include: – Exploratory Purchase Behavior – Use Innovativeness – Vicarious Exploration Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 26 .

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 27 . Inc. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.Cognitive Personality Factors • Need for cognition (NFC) – A person’s craving for enjoyment of thinking – Individual with high NFC more likely to respond to ads rich in product information .

Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 28 .Cognitive Personality Factors • Visualizers • Verbalizers Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

Why Is This Ad Particularly Appealing to Visualizers? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 29 . Inc.

The Ad Stresses Strong Visual Dimensions Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 30 .

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 31 . Inc.Why Is This Ad Particularly Appealing to Verbalizers? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

It Features a Detailed Description Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 32 .

Internet. newspaper. television. salesperson. POP display.Discussion Question • What advertising media (print. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 33 . Inc. radio) is good for a person with a high NFD? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

publishing as Prentice Hall Do not get greater personal satisfaction from possessions Chapter Five Slide 34 . Inc.From Consumer Materialism to Compulsive Consumption Acquire and show off possessions Self centered and selfish Materialistic People Seek lifestyle full of possessions Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 35 .From Consumer Materialism to Compulsive Consumption • Fixated consumption behavior – Consumers fixated on certain products or categories of products – Characteristics • Passionate interest in a product category • Willingness to go to great lengths to secure objects • Dedication of time and money to collecting • Compulsive consumption behavior – “Addicted” or “out-of-control” consumers Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 36 .Consumer Ethnocentrism and Cosmopolitanism • Ethnocentric consumers feel it is wrong to purchase foreign-made products because of the impact on the economy • They can be targeted by stressing nationalistic themes • A cosmopolitan orientation would consider the word to be their marketplace and would be attracted to products from other cultures and countries. Inc. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 37 .Brand Personality • Personality-like traits associated with brands • Examples – Liril and freshness – Nike and athlete – BMW is performance driven • Brand personality which is strong and favorable will strengthen a brand but not necessarily demand a price premium Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 38 .In What Ways Do Max and Other Brand Personifications Help Create VW’s Brand Image? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc.

is “interviewed” about VW products. Inc. and is a friend Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.Speaks English. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 39 .

Do they have a gender? What personality traits do they have? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 40 . • Describe their personality. Inc.Discussion Questions • Pick three of your favorite food brands.

Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 41 . efficient. intelligent and smart. friendly. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. • Brand Personification – Consumer’s perception of brand’s attributes for a human-like character – is seen as dependable.Product Anthropomorphism and Brand Personification • Product Anthropomorphism – Attributing human characteristics to objects – Insurance.

Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 42 .A Brand Personality Framework Figure 5.12 Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

Up-to-date. Cheerful. Young. Family-oriented. Intelligent. Tough.to-earth. Successful. Smooth. Good-looking. Ruggedness Tough Cont…. Wholesome. Satish K Bhatra. Sincere. Glamorous. Excitement Imaginative Up-to-date Reliable 3. Outdoorsy. Independent. Reliable. Masculine. Leader. Original. Honest. Real. Honest 1. Hard working.Part II C5 Consumer Personality Factors Facets Down-to-earth Traits Down. Spirited. Friendly. Secure. Rugged. Sincerity Wholesome Cheerful Daring Spirited 2. 5– 43 Consumer Behaviour (2nd Edition) Satish K Batra / S H H Kazmi Excel Books . Western. Upper class. Unique. Small town. Exciting. Technical. S H H Kazmi Brand Personality The concept of brand personality is believed to be an important element in building brand equity. Contemporary. Cool. Trendy. Daring. Sophistication Charming Outdoorsy 5. Competence Intelligent Successful Upper class 4. Confident. Imaginative. Corporate. Feminine. Copyright © 2008. Charming. Sentimental.

Ext. Delicate Calm Comfortable Submissive Indulgent Unpleasant Non-contemporary Unorganised Emotional Mature Informal Liberal Simple Colourful Vain Measurement Scale of Self-concepts 5– 44 Copyright © 2008. Satish K Bhatra. Ver. Nei-nor Som. Rugged Excitable Uncomfortable Dominating Thrifty Pleasant Contemporary Organised Rational Youthful Formal Orthodox Complex Colourless Modest Ver.Part II C5 Consumer Personality Ext. Som. S H H Kazmi Consumer Behaviour (2nd Edition) Satish K Batra / S H H Kazmi Excel Books .

such as Hidden Valley and Bear Creek • Color – Color combinations in packaging and products denotes personality Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.Product Personality Issues • Gender – Some products perceived as masculine (coffee and toothpaste) while others as feminine (bath soap and shampoo) • Geography – Actual locations. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 45 . Inc. like Philadelphia cream cheese and Arizona iced tea – Fictitious names also used.

Self and Self-Image • Consumers have a variety of enduring images of themselves • These images are associated with personality in that individuals’ consumption relates to self-image Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 46 .

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 47 .One or Multiple Selves • A single consumer will act differently in different situations or with different people • We have a variety of social roles • Marketers can target products to a particular “self” Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc.

and way of behavior • Developed through background. relationships. Inc. experience. possessions. habits. and interaction with others • Consumers select products congruent with this image Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 48 . skills.Makeup of the Self-Image • Contains traits.

publishing as Prentice Hall . Inc.Different Self-Images Actual Self-Image • How consumers see themselves Ideal Self-Image Social Self-Image Ideal Social Self-Image Expected Self-Image • How consumer would like to see themselves • How consumers feel others see them • How consumers would like others to see them • How consumers expect to see themselves in the future • Traits an individual believes are in her duty to possess Chapter Five Slide 49 Out-to self Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

Inc.Which Consumer Self-Image Does This Ad Target. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 50 . and Why? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

Actual self-image because it tells middle-age women who like their hair long to continue doing so. Inc. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 51 .

Extended Self • Possessions can extend self in a number of ways: – Actually – Symbolically – Conferring status or rank – Bestowing feelings of immortality – Endowing with magical powers Copyright 2010 Pearson Education. Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 52 .

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 53 . Inc.Altering the Self-Image • Consumers use self-altering products to express individualism by: – Creating new self – Maintaining the existing self – Extending the self – Conforming Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Five Slide 54 . Inc.Virtual Personality • You can be anyone… – Gender swapping – Age differences – Mild-mannered to aggressive Copyright 2010 Pearson Education.

l Me” 55 .Encourages Fantasying “Dream Gir.

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