Cell Cycle Regulation

Hui Zhang, Ph. D. Department of Genetics Yale University School of Medicine New Haven, CT 06520, USA Telephone: (203)737­1922 Fax: (203)785­7023 E­mail: hui.zhang@yale.edu http://info.med.yale.edu/genetics/fac/HuiZhang.php

 

 

Cell Cycle Regulation:  the mechanisms controlling cell growth, cell duplication,  cell division, and their roles in development and diseases

development cell proliferation differentiation  aging  

cancer

All Organisms are Composed of  Cells­the Cell Theory
•Microorganisms  preliminary observations on
unicell vs. multicell (Anton van Leeuwenhook, 1632-1723)

•Cork shreds  box-like units (cells) (Robert Hooke, 1665) •Animal and plant tissues  fluid + nucleus (Mathios Schleiden
& Theodore Schwann, 1838-39) Theodore

•Cells dividing into cells (Rudolf Virchow, 1858) (Rudolf
   

Unicellular Organisms: bacteria, blue algae,  single cell fungi (yeast), etc.

 

 

Multicellular organisms
cells in an onion root

QuickTimeª and a GIF decompressor are needed to see this picture.

Involving complex programs to coordinate proliferation, differentiation,  and functional specialization of various cells in an organism
   

Cell cycle under microscope

interphase prophase
 

metaphase anaphase
 

telophase

Life Cycles
Mitosis
Reproduction systems

 

 

 

 

Somatic cell cycle can be divided  into G1, S, G2, M phases
Mitosis (M): chromosome condensation

Gap1  (G1)
 

Gap2  (G2)
  DNA synthesis (S): 3H­thymidine incorporation

Embryonic cell division
­Many embryonic cell divisions are rapid (10­15 min) Fertilized eggs from Xenopus, Drosophila, sea urchin, clam, etc. ­Alternating S phase (S) and mitosis (M). ­Uses maternally stored proteins for mitotic divisions.

 

 

Growth factor  signaling

 

  Cell Cycle Regulation/Differentiation

Developmental cell divisions ­cells divide asymmetrically­
Zygote (fertilized egg) Mitosis

Continued cell divisions with different cell fate
    Nerve, muscle, blood, endocrine, epithelial, stem cells, etc.

How cell cycle regulation  can be studied?

 

 

Different systems offer various ways to  identify and isolate cell cycle regulators
­Cultured mammalian cells (Rao and Johnson) ­Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae­Leland Hartwell) ­Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe­Paul Nurse)  ­Frog Oocytes (Xenopus laevis, Rana pipiens­Yoshio Matsui) ­Sea urchin/clam eggs (Joan Ruderman and Tim Hunt)    

 

 

Xenopus Oocyte Maturation and Activation

Maturation (Meiosis)
   

Activation (Mitosis)

Assay for MPF (Yoshio Masui)

 

 

Maturation Promoting (MPF) Factor is  Transferable and Autocatalytically propagated

 

 

MPF is an universal regulator of  mitosis and meiosis

 

MPF from mitotic embryonic or somatic cells and mature eggs behave the same.  

Properties of MPF:

­ promotes oocyte maturation ­ common in all mitotic or meiotic cells from  different sources ­ activity oscillates in the cell cycle, low in  interphase and high in mitotic/meiotic cells

 

 

Nobel Prize Winners  for Cell Cycle Regulation in Physiology or Medicine, 2001

Leland Hartwell
 

Paul Nurse
 

Tim Hunt

Lee Hartwell: isolated a collection of cell­division cycle (cdc) mutants using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Isolated various conditional  budding yeast mutants, mostly  temperature sensitive (ts) mutants that  arrest the cell cycle with growth or  morphological defects 
   

Isolate yeast conditional mutants
Cultured yeast cells
Mutagenize with EMS or other chemicals

High temperature mutants: Grow at 25 oC but not at 37 oC

Classify mutant  Replica plating terminal phenotypes: small bud, dumbbell, no DNA  Grow at permissive  non­growing mutants at synthesis,  25 oC 37 oC. (permissive temperature) (non­permissive temperature) etc.    

Isolation of cdc mutants

cdc mutants arrest with a single cell morphology at a defined cell cycle stage    

Cdc mutants in budding yeast
G1 (Start) mutants: cdc28, cdc4, cdc6, cdc7, etc. S phase mutants: cdc21, cdc46, etc. Mitosis: cdc5, cdc14, cdc15, etc.

 

 

Yeast genomic DNA in a plasmid library (yeast selection and E. coli drug resistant markers) Transfromation (Li acetate, etc) Introduce into interested cdc mutant yeast cells 37 oC Isolate  plasmids

Isolate the genes encoding  yeast cdc mutants

Grow at permissive temperature     (25 oC) and yeast selection media

25 oC

Paul Nurse: isolate cdc mutants from distant fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. S. pombe has  a short G1 but a long G2

Cdc mutants arrest in  G2/M were isolated: cdc2, cdc25, cdc13, etc. 
   

The S. pombe cdc2 mutant
G2 cells Mitosis Cell division

G1 cells

S phase

G2 cells

Cdc2 mutant is defective in both G1 (start) and G2 phases
   

cdc2ts

cdc2ts CDC2 plasmid

 

 

Wild­Type Cells

cdc2ts Cells

cdc2ts Cells + Human CDC2 plasmid

 

 

S. Pombe CDC2 encodes an evolutionarily  conserved serine/threonin kinase
­the fission yeast CDC2 gene by recovering the gene  that rescues the cdc2 G2/M arrest phenotypes. ­S. pombe cdc2 mutant can be rescued by introducing  budding yeast cdc28 (S. cerevisiae) which is primarily  defective in G1 (Start) in budding yeast. ­human CDC2 was isolated using the same rescue strategy. CDC2=CDC28 and regulates both G1 and G2/M.
   

CDC2 is part of MPF activity
Xenopus MPF  Xenopus MPF Inject Oocyte Inject Oocyte Oocyte matuation (meiosis) Oocyte matuation (meiosis)

Absorb by p13SUC1 beads

Bound p34 = CDC2; another protein ~ 50­60 kDa?
 

(yeast p13

  SUC1

 binds yeast and human CDC2)

Discovery of cyclins (Tim Hunt)
sperm

Sea urchin egg

fertilization

  1st  1st  2nd  2nd  S­phase Mitosis S­phase Mitosis A B C
 

Protein synthesized:

A= cyclin A   B= cyclin B

Cyclins behave the same as MPF
­MPF activity fluctuates; cyclin proteins fluctuate ­MPF has a kinase activity ­MPF contains CDC2 and another component MPF= cyclin B (cyclin A) + CDC2

 

 

Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs)
Replication Cyclin A/B CDC2 Active CDC2 Kinase Chromatin condensation Nuclear envelop breakdown Mitotic spindle formation  Activation of Anaphase Promoting  Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) Chromosome cohesion, etc.

Proteolysis of cyclin A and cyclin B in late mitosis     inactivates CDC2 and causes the exit of mitosis.

Wee1 and CDC25
Cell size  A. B. C. wildtype S. pombe  cdc25, cdc13, cdc2 loss of function mutants wee1 and certain gain of function cdc2 mutants CDC13 Inactive CDC2
 

CDC25 WEE1
 

Active CDC2/CDC13 CDC13=cyclin B

 

Y=tyrosine; T=threonine  

CDC25 and WEE1 couples CDC2  activation to S phase in S. pombe
WEE1 kinase Y15­PO4  WT CDC2 Y15  CDC25 pptase CDC2 Cells divide only  in mitosis

Inactive CDC2 S phase cells Y15  Y15F mutant
 

Active CDC2 G2 and mitotic cells F15  CDC2
 

CDC2

Insensitive  to WEE1 Cells divide in  S phase

F=phenylalanine

Active CDC2

Regulation of CDC2 (cyclin­ dependent kinase 1, CDK1)

CDC25 is regulated by phosphorylation and protein degradation    

Budding yeast S. cerevisiae
CDC28 regulates G1 and G2  but most mutants arrest before G1 start
G1 CDC28 S How? G2/M

 

 

CDC28 regulates G1, S, and G2/M by synthesize  distinct cyclins in each phase of the cell cycle
CDC28 S Cln1 Cln2 Cln3 G1 progression Nutrient & cell  size   a/α factor Clb5  Clb6 S phase progression S phase checkpoint
 

Budding yeast S. cerevisiae

G1

G2/M Clb1 Clb2 Clb3 Clb4 G2 and mitosis

Yeast G1 cell cycle regulation
Cln1 Cln2 Expression: G1 Cln3 constant α/a mating factors Nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, lipid, etc.)

G1/S Clb5­6

S

G2/M

Cln1­3 accumulation leads to the progression of G1 phase Over­expression of Cln3 promotes S phase entry at smaller size Clb5­6 starts to synthesize at late G1
   

How S­phase starts in yeast
Cln1 Cln2 Expression: G1 Cln3 constant p40Sic1 p40Sic1 is a CDK inhibitor
   

α/a mating factors Nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, lipid, etc.)

G1/S Clb5­6

S

cdc28 Clb5­6

Inactive Clb5­6/CDC28 kinase

How S­phase starts in yeast
Cln1 Cln2 Expression: G1 Cln3 constant PO4­ p40Sic1 cdc28 Clb5­6
 

α/a mating factors

G1/S Clb5­6

S

PO4­

p40Sic1

 

SCFCDC4

SCF Ubiquitin E3 Ligase  (SKP1, CUL1/CDC53, F­box proteins)
E1 & E2 enzymes

Ubiquitin(ub)

ub ub ub ub

ub ub ub

26S proteosome

> 10 F­box proteins found in yeast
   

Substrate  proteolysis

26S proteasome proteolyzes  polyubiquitinated proteins

 

 

Clb5­6/CDC28 in S phase
Cdc28 For G1 Clb5­6 For G2/M

For S Phosphorylate Cln1/Cln2 Clb1­4 expression  Regulate replication  Other events for G2/M SCF binding initiation at origins Degradation of Cln1/Cln2
 

Turn­off G1 events

 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful