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Multimedia Storytelling JOUR 203

Click to edit Master subtitle style Week 5 Visual Thinking, Shot Variety, Photo Ethics, Captions Jeff Young jryoung@gmail.com

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Profile Critiques

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Profile Critiques

E-mail me at jryoung@gmail.com with the following: which piece you critiqued

Say

Rate Rate

the technical quality from 1-10, and write a sentence explaining why the story quality from 1-10, and write a sentence explaining why
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Photojournalism

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Photojournalism
"The

camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera." ‐‐ Dorothea Lange

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What Photo Editors Look For

Joe Elbert (Washington Post Photo editor)’s 4 major categories:

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What Photo Editors Look For

Joe Elbert (Washington Post Photo editor)’s 4 major categories:

#1 Informational: Who, What, Why, When, Where, How

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This undated photo released by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday Feb. 28, 2010, shows the newly unearthed 3,400‐ year old red granite head, part of a huge statue of the ancient pharaoh Amenhotep III, at the pharaoh's mortuary temple in the city of Luxor. Egypt's Culture Ministry says a team of Egyptian and European archaeologists has unearthed a large head made of red granite of an ancient pharaoh who ruled Egypt some 3,400 years ago.(AP Photo/ Supreme Council of An9qui9es)

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What Photo Editors Look For

Joe Elbert (Washington Post Photo editor)’s 4 major categories:

#2 Graphic: Attempt to make the mundane interesting through composition

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What Photo Editors Look For

Joe Elbert (Washington Post Photo editor)’s 4 major categories:

#3 Emotional: Cause viewer to feel something about the subject

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What Photo Editors Look For

Joe Elbert (Washington Post Photo editor)’s 4 major categories:

#4 Intimate: Make viewer feel close to the situation or subject

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Shot Variety

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Overall Shot

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Medium Shot

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Close-Up Shot

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High/Low-Angle Shot

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Composition

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Rule of Thirds

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Lighting

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Lighting
Main

light source should generally be behind you.

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Lighting
Main

light source should generally be behind you. photograph someone in front of a window (same rule really)

Don’t

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Photo Ethics
3

Basic Approaches:

#1

Utilitarian: “The greatest good for the greatest number of people.”

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Photo Ethics
3

Basic Approaches:

#2 Absolutist: Strict/fundamental about beliefs. i.e. “People have the right to privacy.”

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Photo Ethics
3

Basic Approaches:

#3 The Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

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Don’t Stage Anything!

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Don’t Stage Anything!

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Don’t Stage Anything!

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Don’t Stage Anything!
Pyramids

were

squeezed together digitally to fit the cover's vertical format

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Photo Ethics (Digital)

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Clouds

were “cloned” in Photoshop to make it look more severe than it was.
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Captions
Start

with the most newsworthy, interesting, or unusual facts.

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Captions
AP

Caption Style (3 rules):

#1 First sentence describes what the photo shows, in the present tense, and states where and when the photo was made (i.e. Friday, March 5, 2010)

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Captions
AP

Caption Style (3 rules):

#2 The second sentence gives background on the news event or describes why the photo is significant.

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Captions
AP

Caption Style (3 rules):

#3 Stick to two sentences if at all possible, while including relevant information. Try to anticipate what a newspaper editor or reader will need.

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Captions
4th

rule

#4 End with photo credit information.Photographer and affiliation in parentheses.
Example:

(Inside the Shell/Jeff

Young)
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Captions
5th

rule

#5 Get names of central figures in photographs!

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Rays'

Evan Longoria runs to home plate as his teammates crowd around after his 12th 4/21/12 home inning

In-Class Photo Exercise
In‐class

exercise:

"U of M in three photos." Your editor wants three images for a story titled "My U of M": one overall, one medium, and one close‐ up (detail) shot that relates your view of campus. (could also include low/high angle instead of one of those) • Each shot should have 4/21/12 a caption.

AP Caption Style
1. First sentence describes what the photo shows, in the present tense, and states where and when the photo was made. 2. The second sentence gives background on the news event or describes why the photo is significant. 3. Stick to two sentences if at all 4/21/12 possible, while including relevant

Homework
Photo

Assignment #1 (50 points): Capturing an event in pictures.

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