GOVT. SEC.

SCHOOL, NABHA (BOYS)

COMPUTER LAB

INDEX
• • • • • • • • • • • • • INTRODUCTION DIAGRAM SHOWING ECLIPSE CAUSE OF ECLIPSE TYPES OF ECLIPSE SOLAR ECLIPSE TYPES OF SOLAR ECLIPSE HOW DOES SOLAR ECLIPSE OCCUR? LUNAR ECLIPSE TYPES OF LUNAR ECLIPSE HOW DOES LUNAR ECLIPSE OCCUR? ANNULAR ECPILSE LONGEST ECLIPSE ACKNOWLEDGMENT

INTRODUCTION
Eclipse, in astronomy, the obscuring  of  one  celestial  body  by  another,  particularly  that  of  the  sun  or  a  planetary satellite. One consequence of the Moon's orbit about the  Earth  is  that  the  Moon  can  shadow  the  Sun's  light  as  viewed from the Earth, or the Moon can pass through  the  shadow  cast  by  the  Earth.  The  former  is  called  a  solar eclipse and the later is called a lunar eclipse. The  small tilt of the Moon's orbit with respect to the plane  of  the  ecliptic  and  the  small  eccentricity  of  the  lunar  orbit make such eclipses much less common than they  would  be  otherwise,  but  partial  or  total  eclipses  are  actually rather frequent. 

DIAGRAM SHOWING HOW ECLIPSE OCCURS

WHAT CAUSES AN ECLIPSE?
An eclipse occurs at those times when the Moon  moves into a position of direct alignment with the  Sun and the Earth. 

TYPES OF ECLIPSE
There are two basic types of eclipses – 3.  Solar Eclipse  4. Lunar Eclipse

SOLAR ECLIPSE
A solar eclipse occurs when The Moon lies between  the Sun and Earth, casting its shadow on our planet.  This only happens with a New Moon. 

TYPES OF SOLAR ECLIPSES
• • • Total Solar Eclipses occur when the umbra of the  Moon's shadow touches a region on the surface of  the Earth.  Partial Solar Eclipses occur when the penumbra of  the Moon's shadow passes over a region on the  Earth's surface.  Annular Solar Eclipses occur when a region on the  Earth's surface is in line with the umbra, but the  distances are such that the tip of the umbra does not  reach the Earth's surface. 

HOW DOES A SOLAR ECLIPSE HAPPEN?
Solar eclipses are an accident of nature. They are so spectacular   because  the Moon and the Sun appear almost the same size. In reality the Sun is  much further away then the Moon, but much larger.  The Moon orbits the Earth once a month, and eclipses happen if it lines up  exactly with the Earth and the Sun.  Solar eclipses occur at New Moon,  when the Moon is between Earth and the Sun. Lunar eclipses occur at Full  Moon, when Earth is between the Sun and the Moon. Eclipses do not take  place every month because the orbits of the Moon and Earth are tilted at  an angle. Most of the time, the line- up is not precise enough for an  eclipse. However, there are more eclipses than people are generally aware  of:      There are at least two eclipses of the Sun each year, though most are  partial.      There are at least two eclipses of the Moon each year, though a  proportion of these are only penumbral, when the Moon is not seen to  darken by very much. 

LUNAR ECLIPSE
A lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth lies between the Sun and  Moon, so that the Earth’s shadow darkens the Moon. This only  happens with a Full Moon.

HOW DOES LUNAR ECLIPSE OCCUR?
"During a total lunar eclipse, the Earth blocks the Sun's light from reaching the Moon. Astronauts on the Moon would then see the Earth eclipsing the Sun. (They would see a bright red ring around the Earth as they watched all the sunrises and sunsets happening simultaneously around the world!) While the Moon remains completely within Earth's umbra shadow, indirect sunlight still manages to reach and illuminate it. However, this sunlight must first pass deep through the Earth's atmosphere which filters out most of the blue colored light. The remaining light is a deep red or orange in color and is much dimmer than pure white sunlight. Earth's atmosphere also bends or refracts some of this light so that a small fraction of it can reach and illuminate the Moon."

The  Moon  is  not  normally  completely  dark  during  an  eclipse  because  some  sunlight  is  scattered  towards  the  Moon by Earth's atmosphere. Usually, the Moon appears a  deep  coppery-orange  colour  even  during  totality.  However, the colour and brightness are variable from one  eclipse  to  another.  They  depend  on  factors  such  as  the  amount  of  volcanic  dust  and  cloud  in  the  atmosphere  at  the time. 

TYPES OF LUNAR ECLIPSES
• Penumbral Lunar Eclipse The Moon passes through Earth's penumbral shadow.  These events are of only academic interest since they are subtle  and quite difficult to observe. 2. Partial Lunar Eclipse A portion of the Moon passes through Earth's umbra shadow.  These events are easy to see, even with the unaided eye.  3. Total Lunar Eclipse  The entire Moon passes through Earth's umbral shadow.  These events are quite striking for the vibrant range of colors  the Moon can take on during the total phase (i.e. - totality). 

ANNULAR ECLIPSE
The distances between Earth and the Sun and Moon vary slightly,  so  their  apparent  sizes  very  a  little  too. Sometimes  an  eclipse  occurs  that  would  be  total  except  that  the  Moon  looks  too  small  to  cover  the  whole  Sun. The  result  is  an  annular  eclipse,  where  a  bright  ring  of  the  Sun  stays  visible.  Annular  means  ring-shaped.  The corona  cannot  be  seen  during  an  annular  eclipse  because  even  a  thin ring of the Sun makes the sky too bright. 

THE LONGEST ECLIPSES
Some total solar eclipses are long and some are short.  Following are some of the longest eclipses ever occurred:       The longest possible duration of totality is 7 minutes 31  seconds.       The longest solar eclipse of the 20th century was on 30  June 1973.       The most recent 'long' eclipse was on 11 July 1991 (6 m  54 s).       The next 'long' eclipse is on 22 July 2009 (6 m 40 s). 

PREPARED BY:

Smt. Gurbrinder Kaur Lect. Geography M.Sc. (GEO), M. PHIL. , B.A. (HONS), B.Ed.

HELPED BY:
• DAVINDER SINGH • KRISHEN • SONY

REFERENCES
• INTERNET: • WWW.ECLIPSE.COM • WWW.ANSWERS.COM 2.TEXT BOOK OF 7TH CLASS 3.MICROSOFT ENCARTA ENCYCLOPEDIA

GUIDED BY

DEEPAK CHAWLA [M.C.A ] (COMPUTER FACULTY) TEACHER TRAINER

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful