You are on page 1of 40

Amity School of Business

Amity School of Business
BBA SEMESTER V BS V (GDTB) BBA+MBA MODULE-1 Parul Goel

Amity School of Business

Identify Human Values that you possess in your personality
• • • • • • • • • • Interaction in Teams Group Formation Communicating in Teams Decisiveness Team Leadership Power & Politics Team Conflict management Trust in Team Cohesion in team Diversity in workforce

Amity School of Business

SAP TITLE
TRANSFORMING AGGRESSION INTO COMPASSION
(Can be – Collage, Role Play, Case study, Presentation etc. Individual/Group)

Amity School of Business

nce upon a time...
A group of students had four members called Everybody, Somebody, Anybody, and Nobody. There was an important job to be done. Everybody was sure that Somebody would do it. Anybody could have done it, but Nobody did it. Somebody got angry about that because it was Everybody’s job. Everybody thought Anybody could do it but Nobody realized that Everybody wouldn’t do it. It ended up that Everybody blamed Somebody when Nobody did what Anybody could have done.
- Graham Gibbs, “Learning in Teams”

Amity School of Business

Groups and Organizational Effectiveness
• Group
– Two or more people who interact with each other to accomplish certain goals or meet certain needs.

Amity School of Business

Differences Between Organizations and Groups
• An organization can be so large that most members do not know most of the other people within it. • Groups are small and immediate enough to impact both feelings and self image. • People tend to be more psychologically invested with groups to which they belong. • Certain psychological needs are better satisfied by groups.

Amity School of Business

Group Dynamics:
Helping Groups to Work Effectively

Amity School of Business

Group Dynamics
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

Margaret Mead

Amity School of Business

Group Dynamics
The social process by which people interact in a group environment The influences of personality, power and behaviour on the group process

Amity School of Business

Groups and Teams
• Two characteristics distinguish teams from groups
– Intensity with which team members work together – Presence of a specific, overriding team goal or objective

Amity School of Business

The Top Five Ways to Wreck a Group
List 5 behaviors or actions that can undermine good group Function. Report out in 5 minutes.

Question?

Amity School of Business

Which type of group is one that managers establish to achieve organization goals? A. Formal group B. Informal group C. Virtual team D. Interest group

Amity School of Business

The Types of Groups
• Formal Group – A group that managers establish to achieve organization goals.

Amity School of Business

Formal Groups
• Cross-functional teams
– composed of members from different departments

• Cross-cultural teams
– composed of members from different cultures or countries

Amity School of Business

The Types of Groups
• Informal Group
– A group that managers or nonmanagerial employees form to help achieve their own goals or to meet their own needs.

Amity School of Business

Friendship Groups
An informal group composed of employees who enjoy one another’s company and socialize with one another

Amity School of Business

Interest Groups
An informal group of employees seeking to achieve a common goal related to their membership in an organization

Amity School of Business

Group Dynamics : Interdependence
• Pooled
– Members make separate, independent contributions to group such that group performance is the sum of each member’s contributions

Amity School of Business

Group Dynamics: Interdependence
• Sequential
– Members perform tasks in a sequential order making it difficult to determine individual performance since one member depends on another.

Amity School of Business

Group Dynamics: Interdependence
• Reciprocal
– Work performed by one group member is mutually dependent on work done by other members.

Amity School of Business

Counseling
Counselling - inner healing -to effect behavioural change. Two methods are offered: individual or group.

Counselling is a process whereby the relationship and communication provided allows development of understanding of one's self, explore possibilities, and initiate change. It is motivated by care and concern for the well-being of the recipient, and aim at bringing about behavioural change, problem-solving, personal growth and development when properly implemented

Amity School of Business

Why Choose Group Counseling?
• • • • • Group Counselling serves specific goals, Share their problems, Provide empathy and support to the others Try and change their self defeating behaviours . Dealing with interpersonal problems.

Amity School of Business

Group Counseling
Advantages of Group Counselling
• It provides a social atmosphere that is similar to the real world. • Members can test out and practice new behaviors.

• Members can practice new interpersonal skills.
• They are cost effective. • Groups help members see that they are not the only one who has that particular problem or issue. • Groups provide members with support.

Amity School of Business

Group Counseling
Disadvantages of Group Counselling
• Less individualized attention from the counselor.

• Confidentiality is more difficult to maintain.
• There are concerns with conformity and peer pressure. • Not everyone can be in a group (e.g. those with issues too severe or those with poor interpersonal skills.) • Group leaders are not always properly trained.

Amity School of Business

The Stages of Group Counselling

Amity School of Business

Group Counseling
Stages of Groups
• Orientation/Forming: Group members become oriented to the group and to each other. • Transition/Storming: Anxiety and ambiguity become prevalent as group members struggle to define themselves and group norms. This stage is often characterized by conflict.

Amity School of Business

Group Counseling
Stages of Groups (continued)
• Cohesiveness/ Norming: A therapeutic alliance forms between group members. Trust between members has been established. • Working/Performing: Group members experiment with new ideas, behaviors or ways of thinking. Egalitarianism develops. • Adjourning/Terminating: This is the time when the group disbands.

Amity School of Business

Group Counseling
Leadership Styles
• Authoritarian: Leader centered. • Democratic: Participant centered. • Laissez-Faire: No designated leadership.

Amity School of Business

Group Counseling
Leadership Functions
• Emotional Stimulation: Challenging, confronting, modeling selfdisclosure etc. • Caring: Showing support, praise, warmth, acceptance etc. • Meaning Attribution: Explaining, clarifying, interpreting etc. • Executive Function: Setting limits, providing rules, managing time etc.

Amity School of Business

Group Counseling
Group Counselling Techniques
• Facilitating communication: Giving constructive feedback, preventing members from engaging in negative behaviors (gossiping, storytelling etc.)
• Group Processing: Making comments on group process.

• Directing the Focus on the Here and Now: Keeping the focus on right now and not going back to dwell on the past.
• Experimentation: Helping members try out new attitudes and behaviors. • Universalizing: Helping members realize they are not alone in their problem(s). • Linking: Connecting various feelings and concerns expressed by group members to present a common theme or universalizing aspect.

Amity School of Business

Grief / Loss
OBJECTIVES
• Express feelings about loss • Learn five stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance) • Discuss happy memories • Identify ways to handle stress and loss

Amity School of Business

OBJECTIVES

Family Groups (Divorce/Separation)

• Express feelings about changing family • Understand that divorce/separation is not child’s fault • Identify common problems associated with divorce/separation • Understand positive ways family and group members can help in adjustment

Anger
OBJECTIVES

Amity School of Business

• Identify factors that cause anger • Understand the consequences of irrational behavior when angry • Examine why some situations make everyone mad and others do not • Identify different anger reduction techniques

Amity School of Business

Managing Conflicts
OBJECTIVES
• • • • • Identify feelings and appropriately express them Learn Win/Win resolutions Speak clearly Understand others point of view (be empathic) Learn how to talk out conflicts

Amity School of Business

Counseling Approaches in MultiCultural Perspectives
• Many counseling approaches fail to meet the complex needs of various ethnic and minority clients.

• The ethnic and minority clients perceive that the counselors have stereotyped perceptions about their needs. • Asian-American, African-American,and members of other minority groups terminate significantly earlier than do European-American clients.

Amity School of Business

If the counselor intends to be involved in group work with culturally diverse population:
• He/She must be willing to modify their strategies to meet the unique needs of the members.
• He/She must be aware that no one right technique can be utilized across the board with clients irrespective of their cultural background. • He/She must feel there is a need to develop culture specific strategies for diverse population.

Amity School of Business

Potential Issues in Culturally Diverse Counseling Groups
• • • • • • Extreme emotionality Lack of communication Trust “Feelings of belongingness” Theoretical orientation of the leader Educational preparation and technical experience of the leader

Amity School of Business

Strategies and Recommendations
• If possible, group counselors should avoid having a single member of a minority or “out-group” in group counseling, because such an arrangement may block communication and group cohesion. • It may be necessary for some types of group to have coleaders from different racial, ethnic, and cultural background. • Change the way individual members interact with another. • Assess and explore potential prejudiced attitudes held by group members.

Amity School of Business

Recommendations for group counselors:
• Consultation or group coleadership with minority counselors already serving specific cultural groups.
Participation in a cultural immersion experience. Actively taking inventory of the needs and issues of minority groups in their communities.

• •

Language training when possible, or at least becoming familiar with the correct pronunciation of ethnic names, values, and traditions.

Activity # 2

Amity School of Business

Example: A BPO learns that customers are unhappy with customer support and this is causing a loss of customers. The trainer introduces the problem and encourages an open discussion in order to put all the relevant issues on the table and get participants thinking about the problem in depth. Group A playing the role of a customer relationship manager receives a card which states: "This customer is very influential. To lose them would be highly damaging to the company. You must do anything within reason to retain them" Group B playing the role of the customer receives a card stating: "You have seriously overspent your software budget and while you are not unhappy with the product, you must convince the customer support person to take back the product and refund your money. Since you cannot admit the actual situation (as it would clearly not be legitimate for a refund), you must find problems with the software sufficient to legitimize the return and refund."