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What Is A Smoking Addiction?

A smoking addiction means a person has formed an uncontrollable dependence on cigarettes to the point where stopping smoking would cause severe emotional, mental, or physical reactions. Everyone knows that smoking is harmful and addictive, but few people realize just how risky and addictive it is. Most smokers want to stop and do indeed try, but only one in three succeeds in stopping permanently

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Why Is Smoking Addictive?


Nicotine is a psychoactive drug with stimulant effects on the electrical activity of the brain. It also has calming effects, especially at times of stress, as well as effects on hormonal and other systems throughout the body. Although its subjective effects are less dramatic and obvious than those of some other addictive drugs, smoking doses of nicotine causes activation of "pleasure centers" in the brain (for example, the mesolimbic dopamine system), which 4/28/12

7 Reasons why people start smoking

when parents are too strict and disciplinarian. what starts out as a rebellion, could turn into a serious addiction. parents who smoke, set an example for their children Appear cool and grown up, or to imitate role models, movie idols, etc his/her friends pressured to smoke fit-in with the crowd.

Smoking as a stress buster: because of the 4/28/12 high or the kick that nicotine provides

Facts About Smoking And Addiction

Smoking-related illnesses cause about 440,000 deaths each year in the U.S. Smoking is responsible for 87 percent of lung cancers and also causes most cases ofemphysemaand chronicbronchitis. 4/28/12

Diseases

We are going to look at the main types of diseases which you can get from smoking, which are: Bronchitis Emphysema Heart disease cancer

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Bronchitis

What is chronic bronchitis? Chronic bronchitis is a chronic inflammatory condition in the lungs that causes the respiratory passages to be swollen and irritated, increases the mucus production and may damage the lungs. The symptoms are coughing and 4/28/12

Emphysema

Effects the alveoli The smokers cough weekens the walls of the alveoli, therefore the lungs can not take in enough oxygen which leads to breathlessness.

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Cancer

Increased risk of developing lung cancer Number of cigarettes smoked per day Annual death rate per 100,000 men 010-14 (8 times that of non-smokers)

15-25 (13 times that of non-smokers) 4/28/12

Healthy Lungs & Lung after smoking

Lung after Healthy Lungs smoking

You can see how the lung looks 4/28/12

Smokers lung with cancer. White area

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer kills more people than any other type of cancer and at least 80% of these deaths are caused by smoking. In 1999, 29,406 people in England and Wales died of lung cancer. It is the tar in the `cigarettes which contain the carcinogenic cancer 4/28/12 causing substances

Heart Disease

The role of smoking in Coronary Heart Disease Inhaling tobacco smoke causes several immediate responses within the heart and its blood vessels. Within one minute of starting to smoke, the heart rate begins to rise: it may increase by as much as 30 percent during the first 10 minutes of smoking. Nicotine raises blood 4/28/12 pressure: blood vessels

Heart Disease

Smoking tends to increase blood cholesterol levels. Carbon monoxide attaches itself to haemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying pigment in red blood cells) much more easily than oxygen does. This reduces 4/28/12 the amount of oxygen

Cilia and smoking

The following series of slides illustrate microscopic changes that happen when a person smokes. The first slide is showing an illustrated blow-up of the normal lining of the bronchus. On the top we see the cilia, labeled (H). They are attached to columnar cells, labeled (I). The cilia sweep the mucous produced in the goblet cells, labeled (J) as well as mucous coming from deeper glands within the lungs and the particulate matter trapped in the mucous. The bottom layer of cells, labeled (L) are the basal cells.

Cilia and smoking

Below we start to see the changes that occur as people begin to smoke. You will see that the columnar cells are starting to be crowded out and displaced by additional layers of basal cells. Not only are fewer cilia present but the ones that are still functioning are doing so at a much lower level of efficiency. Many chemicals in tobacco smoke are toxic to cilia, first slowing them down, soon paralyzing them all together and then destroying them.

Cilia and smoking

As you see with the cilia actions being diminished, mucous starts to build up in the small airways making it harder for the smoker to breathe and causing the characteristic smokers cough in order to clear out the airways. Eventually though, the ciliated columnar cells are totally displaced. As can be seen below ominous changes have taken place. Not only is the smoker more prone to infection from the loss of the cleansing mechanism of the cilia, but these abnormal cells (O) are cancerous squamous cells. These cells will eventually break through the basement membrane wall and invade into underlying lung tissue and often spread throughout the body long before the person even knows they have the disease.

Cilia and smoking

If a smoker quits before cancer actually starts, even if the cells are in a precancerous state, the process is highly reversible. . Cilia regeneration starts in about 3 days once smoking stops. Even if cilia has been destroyed and not present for years, the lining tissue of the windpipe will start to repair. Even the precancerous cells will be sloughed off over time, reversing the cellular process to the point where the lining tissue goes back to normal. But if a smoker waits too long and cancer starts, it may be too late to save his or her life.

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Smoking Deaths Worldwide

Around 5.4 million deaths a year are caused by tobacco.* Smoking is set to kill 6.5 million people in 2015 and 8.3 million humans in 2030, with the biggest rise in low-and middle-income countries. * Every 6.5 seconds a current or former smoker dies, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). * An estimated 1.3 billion people are smokers worldwide (WHO).

Over 443,000 Americans (over 18 percent 4/28/12 of all deaths) die because of smoking each

Steps to quitting
1. 2. 3. 4.

Get ready Get support Learn new skills and behaviors Get medication if recommended by your doctor and use it correctly Be prepared for cravings and withdrawal symptoms

5.

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Steps to quitting
Step 1: Get Ready

Set a quit date Get rid of all cigarettes and ashtrays at home, work, and in your car Keep a diary of when and why you smoke Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW for free materials Tell friends and family youre going to stop

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Steps to Quitting
Step 2: Get Support

Your chances of success increase if you have a support network Ask friends, family, and coworkers for their support in helping you quit Ask others not to smoke around you or leave cigarettes out in the open Talk to your family physician about tobaccos effects on the body, choosing a quit plan, and dealing with withdrawal

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Steps to quitting
Step 3: Learn New Skills & Behaviors

Distract yourself from urges to smoke

Talk to someone Go for a walk Get busy with a task Go somewhere youre not allowed to smoke

Change your routine


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Take

a different route to work

Steps to quitting
Step 4: Get Medication

Your family physician may recommend one of these to help you quit:

Bupropion SR gum inhaler nasal spray patch

Nicotine Nicotine Nicotine Nicotine

Varenicline
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Steps to quitting
Step 5: Avoid Relapse

Most relapses occur within the first three months Avoid drinking alcohol drinking lowers your chances of success Avoid being around other smokers can make you want to smoke Expect a small weight gain (usually less than 10 pounds) Eat a healthy diet
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Managing withdrawal
Symptoms

Most intense during the first three to seven days May continue for several weeks but will get less severe Triggers or cues associated with smoking can cause cravings

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Managing withdrawal

Exercise Reduce or avoid caffeine or other stimulants Relax before going to bed Make your bedroom quiet Keep a bedtime routine Drink plenty of water Use cough drops to relieve throat irritation

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Managing withdrawal
If youre having trouble concentrating

Adjust your schedule to a lighter workload Lower your expectations on the amount of work you can do Understand the amount of energy and time it takes to stop smoking

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Managing withdrawal
If you crave a cigarette

Wait out the craving (usually less than five minutes) Try deep breathing Use distractions Call someone in your support network Chew gum Brush your teeth

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Renew your dedication

Reward yourself for resisting urges to smoke Review your reasons for stopping Remind yourself often how well youre doing

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You can do it!

Tobacco addiction is a chronic disease seek advice, support, and care from your family physician to increase your chance of success Quitting smoking can reduce illness, prevent death, and increase your quality of life Quitting can be difficult remember to ask for help You can do it!

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Resources
Free Quitlines:

1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669)
Youll

be automatically routed to a state-run or National Cancer Institute quitline get immediate advice on quitting and an offer to have materials mailed to you

Youll

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Resources
Web Sites with helpful information:

familydoctor.org www.smokefree.gov www.surgeongeneral.gov/tobacco http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/quit_smoking http://www.cancer.org/Healthy/StayAway fromTobacco

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Presentation Prepared
By Click to edit Master subtitle style Mahesh Vijay Sadavarte Thank You

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