TPM

A Practical Approach To Sustainable Results Presented By Maslow Trainers & Consultants Sdn.Bhd.

Nine Reasons Why Bad Things Happen to Good Maintenance Change Projects
1. Failure to Create a Powerful Mandate for Change 2. Failing to Deliver Early, Tangible Results 3. Failing to "Connect the Dots" 4. Old Performance Measures Block Change 5. Failure to Pull all the Levers of Change 6. "What's in it for me" is unclear 7. Inadequate Scope for the Maintenance Change Project 8. Failure to Manage Stakeholder Communications 9. Too Much Conventional Wisdom

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aintenance

Breakdown Predictive Preventive

Maintenance

Basic Foundations of TPM
         Everyday Maintenance Periodic Maintenance Instant Maintenance Corrective Maintenance Preventative Maintenance Predictive maintenance Pro-active maintenance Autonomous Maintenance Reliability Centered Maintenance

Total Productive Maintenance
Keeping the current plant and equipment at its highest productive level through cooperation of all areas of the organization

Thinking Hats
With this thinking hat you focus on the data available. Look at the information you have, and see what you can learn from it. Look for gaps in your knowledge, and either try to fill them or take account of them. This is where you analyze past trends, and try to extrapolate from historical data. Using black hat thinking, look at all the bad points of the decision. Look at it cautiously and defensively. Try to see why it might not work. This is important because it highlights the weak points in a plan. It allows you to eliminate them, alter them, or prepare contingency plans to counter them. Black Hat thinking helps to make your plans 'tougher' and more resilient. It can also help you to spot fatal flaws and risks before you embark on a course of action.

'Wearing' the red hat, you look at problems using intuition, gut reaction, and emotion. "Putting on my red hat, I think this is a terrible proposal." Usually the feeling is genuine but the logic might not be too great for others to understand.

The yellow hat helps you to think positively. It is the optimistic viewpoint that helps you to see all the benefits of the decision and the value in it. Yellow Hat thinking helps you to keep going when everything looks gloomy and difficult.

The Green hat focuses on creativity: the possibilities, alternatives, and new ideas. It is a freewheeling way of thinking, in which there is little criticism of ideas.

The Blue Hat is used to manage the thinking process. "Putting on my blue hat, I feel we should do some more green hat thinking at this point."

TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE
TPM is:

¢ Having a clean, tidy and safe work place ¢ Keeping machines and tools in good condition ¢ Having a say in what goes on in your cell/area ¢ Getting things done ¢ Making life easier - being in control ¢ Working in a ‘smart’ way ¢ Owning and having a pride in your machines/cell/area ¢ Teamwork - production and maintenance ¢ About making machines as ‘effective’ as possible

TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE
TPM IS NOT: ¢ Operators carrying out Maintenance Engineers’ jobs ¢ A way of making people work harder ¢ Employees expected to carry out tasks that they are not trained for ¢ A way of monitoring employees ¢ Extra duties in your own time ¢ Anything other than common sense and correct working practices ¢ Just a change for the shop-floor

Components of TPM
CAN DO Activities Machine Systems Effectiveness Improvements Continuous Improvement Autonomous Maintenance

People
Machine Systems Maintenance Prevention Design Machine Systems Specification & Selection Maintenance Systems Machine Systems Integration

Total Productive Maintenance Recipe
Learn the new philosophy Promote the new philosophy Fund the training and train everyone Identify areas of the needed improvement Formulate performance goals Develop implementation plan Establish autonomous work groups

TARGET

Equipment Effectiveness

85%

Operator Autonomous Maintenance 7 Steps
T P M

Aut. Mgt. Standardization Autonomous Inspection

7 7 6 5 4 3 3 2 2 1 1

OIL
General Inspection Prepare Temporary Standards Countermeasures for Contamination Initial Clean-up

TPM
Initial Focus

5S

TPM I Step 1 Step 2 Step 3

TPM II Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7

prerequisite for TPM I

STEP 3: Prepare Temporary Standards
This step is to enhance the equipment reliability & maintainability.

• Temporary Check Sheet For Clean-Up, Lubrication, Start-up, and Shut-down:
– – – – – – What items need to be done Who will perform the check How often to check Where the location is to be checked What to use for the inspection or cleaning Target time to complete the task

• TPM = Total Productive Maintenance

TPM Summary
Peak Performance

– Proactive (all employees involved) – Preventive – Predictive – Planned

Continuous Waste Reduction

• TPM is an integral part of JLF Total Quality production System

5S
Visual Factory

TPM

Standardized Work

TPM is a Lean tool for Quality and Productivity

“If you leave us our money, buildings and our brands but take away our people the company will fail. But if you take away our money, our buildings and our brands but leave our people, we can rebuild the whole thing in a decade”. Chairman - Procter & Gamble

Group 1: TPM For Shop-floor
- Confirming TPM basic practices in the shop-floor
Target group: Operators & Leaders Program Content: • TPM Overview for operators
    

Duration: 2 days

Why do TPM – understand the nature of losses Roles of Production & Maintenance Interactive; discussion, Productivity concept in TPM exercise, Q&A on The aims of TPM participant’s The stages of TPM development
understanding

Step 1: Initial Cleaning Activity:
   

Aims from equipment and human perspective. How to develop and proceed step 1 Typical activities – examples, witness such activities in the shop-floor Step 1 audit – preparing audit checklist

Group 1: TPM For Shop-floor
- Confirming TPM basic practices in the shop-floor
• • Program Content (continue): Step 2: Eliminating source of contamination
    Aims from equipment and human perspective. How to develop and proceed step 2 Typical activities – examples, witness such activities in the shop-floor Step 2 audit – examples, perform mock audit in the shop-floor Aims from equipment and human perspective. How to develop and proceed step 3 Establishing lubrication control system – examples, witness such activities in the shop-floor Establishing tentative cleaning and lubrication standards – standard preparation using model workstation in the shop-floor

Step 3: Cleaning & Lubrication Standard
   

Group 2: TPM For Leaders
Improving Knowledge & skill in maintaining equipment condition / performance
Target group: Leaders & Maintenance Staff Duration: 2 days Program Content: • TPM overview for leaders
 Understand the nature of losses  The six major losses in TPM  Allocating roles and responsibilities

• Improving equipment performance
       Strategies towards zero breakdown Integrate Small Group Activities Activities for zero breakdown Improving setup and adjustment Reducing minor stoppages Reducing speed losses Reducing quality defects

Case study; group discussion/ presentation, Q&A on participant’s understanding

Group 2: TPM For Leaders
Improving Knowledge & skill in maintaining equipment condition / performance Program Content (continue): • Maintenance skill training
 Setting objectives and curriculum  The roles of leaders and maintenance personnel  Training methodology and techniques  Related subjects and courses Group discussion, mock training  Conducting the training

• Knowing your machine

presentation,

 Develops machine inspection procedures  Preparing inspection education  Conducting inspection education  Set tentative inspection standards

Group 3: TPM For Leaders
Maintenance management systems
Target group: Leaders & Maintenance Staff Duration: 2 days Program Content: • Standardization of maintenance activities
 Types of maintenance standards  Revision of standards

• Developing periodical maintenance • Managing maintenance records
 Types of maintenance records  Equipment performance and utilization  Computerization of maintenance records

 Types of maintenance plans  Preparing annual and monthly maintenance plans

Interactive; discussion, shopfloor visit, Q&A

Group 3: TPM For Leaders
Enhancing Preventive Maintenance Management Systems
Program Content (continue): • Spare parts management
 Purpose of spare parts control  Classification of maintenance materials  Establishing order points, quantities and ordering methods

• Lubrication control
 Types and uses of lubricants  Lubricating methods

• Predictive Maintenance and Condition-Based Maintenance
 Application and Aims of Predictive Maintenance  Equipment Diagnostic Techniques  Method of Condition Monitoring Techniques

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