They want to get JUST a byte.

They would run after you JUST to get a word.

They plead you to give them JUST 2 minutes of your valuable time.

They make you feel as if the only purpose of their existence is JUST to have a very short interaction with you.

However, you speak something wrong (unintended they won’t think twice before............

or not) and

Pulling Your Pants Down In Public

In order to avoid this during the course of this presentation we would go over six main heads which are

The Formal Interview Post Interview Evaluation Difficult Interview Questions

General Interview Guidelines

Interview Tactics Interview Failures

1 RECORD

2 PREPARE

THE FORMAL INTERVIEW

3 TACTICS

4 TAKE CHARGE

R E C O R D
Record formal interviews for selfprotection. This is a safety mechanism to fight back against unfair journalism and inaccurate reporting. In addition, listen to the recording afterwards to improve your interviewing skills.

P R E P A R E

•Know the reporter's story needs. Make sure that you have obtained in advance the parameters of the interview. •Prepare three or four points you want to make, including effective company "tie-ins" to the interview topic. State them at the beginning of the interview. •Practice short, catchy sentences involving your main points that the writer could pick up easily as quotes for the story. •Anticipate difficult questions. Make your answer a positive statement, rather than a response to what might be a negative tone of the question. •Speak to the target audience of the publication.

•Use Sound Bites. Make your point immediately and concisely. You probably won't have time to build a lengthy argument that concludes with your point.

T A C T I C S

•Don't be a Slave to a Question. Think about the question and analyze its significance. Then build a bridge to your agenda by using such phrases as "Let me put that into perspective" or "Let me put that into a different context. •Listen Carefully Don't be afraid to ask interviewer for clarification, if you don't understand the question. Ask your own question, such as "Do you mean... or … ?“ •Silence is OK. Give your answer and then stop talking. Don't be intimidated by silence into saying more than you should. Use silence to collect your thoughts and compose yourself.

T A K E
Be colorful.

Be assertive.

C H A R G E
Avoid being stiff.

Support your statement.

BACK

GENERAL INTERVIEW GUIDELINES

ATTRIBUTION
• Set the level of attribution before an interview • Everything you say is "on the record," unless you make another arrangement with a reporter. • Don't say anything you don't want to see in print. • You can give comments on background or on a "not-forattribution" basis in special circumstances. • Use "off the record" sparingly. It appears as if you are hiding something, and a good reporter can usually find out what it is.

ANSWERING QUESTIONS
Don’t Feel Pressured to Answer Immediately. If you don't have an immediate answer to a question, say "I will get back to you with an answer." Hold off on a response if your additional research can provide a more complete answer. By being 100 percent accurate, you will enhance your reputation as a dependable source.

BE HELPFUL
Be Helpful Even if You May Not Benefit. Don't treat media requests as frivolous. The goal is to build longterm relationships with news organizations. Cooperation now means that you will probably be used as an industry spokesperson again.

DEADLINES
Help reporters meet deadlines. Don't make reporters wait on deadline because you neglect to return calls. If you commit yourself to provide information, follow through quickly. If you are unable to obtain the data, get back to the reporter rapidly to inform him or her.

DON’T HIDE
Try Not to Avoid Questions. Failing to answer a question may give an impression that you are hiding something. If a question is sensitive, give a brief answer and move along. Be alert to major issues affecting your company and find out the standard company response before talking to media. Learn to "bridge over" to a positive statement after responding.

ACCURACY
Be accurate. If you discover information relayed to a reporter is outdated, call back the reporter with correct facts. He or she will appreciate your concern for accuracy.

PATIENCE
Be Patient. Don't let it appear as if your time is too valuable to waste on media. If you are busy when a reporter phones, offer to return the call that same day at a more convenient time. Then do it.

Be Patient

and

Always smile

GRUDGES
Don't Hold Grudges. If a reporter has written a negative story about your company, then calls on another story, don't hold back. Your objective is to achieve a professional relationship with the media. Don't let a reporter's previous actions stop you from building the relationship

INDUSTRY SPOKESPERSON
Comment on general industry trends. Don't insist on a guarantee that your company will be included in a story. Journalists appreciate the assistance of corporate executives with knowledge of a subject. Most likely, your company will receive recognition in an article. Even if it doesn't, you and your company benefit when you are quoted as a knowledgeable industry leader.

BACK

5
INTERVIEW FAILURES

1
Failure to take control.
The spokesperson is there to disseminate information, not just answer questions

2
Failure to anticipate questions.
There should be few or no surprises in an interview

3
Failure to deliver key messages.
Know the key message before the interview and practice getting it in.

4
Failure to stick to facts.
Speculating or answering hypothetical questions can get you into trouble. Confine answers to what is known.

5
Failure to stay calm.
When you stay cool, you show a willingness to cooperate with reporters and convey an impression of candor.

BACK

Analogies are strong, colorful and powerful. "It's like Rubik's cube without colors… "

Qualify statements through examples whenever possible. "Last year our company donated more than $1 million..."

Precise statistics bring your information to life. "We're creating 5,600 new jobs this year… "

Examples Analogies

Statistics

Anecdotes give perspective and add meaning to your message. "One time I discovered a fraud…"

Anecdotes
Personal experiences are credible and important. "When I joined this corporation, we… "

Independent experts provide support for your theses. "HBS professor Michael Porter agrees that..."

Expert Opinion Personal Experience

TV Tips
• Be yourself. Don't look at the camera. Look at the host and be friendly. •Use clear language. Avoid jargon. •Be aware of body language. Keep your feet flat on the floor. Avoid extraneous movement.

Quotes
Quotes from experts add credence to your comments. "Alan Greenspan also says that..."

BACK

Non Verbal Headlines Control Specifics Messages Agenda

Did you connect with the interviewer? Did you generate any, either positive or negative? Did you stay in charge of the interview? Did you provide enough specific information? Did you deliver your key messages? Did you follow your agenda? BACK

The False Alternative Example: "Was your decision based on monopolistic practice or did you just not know?“ Solution: Ignore the alternatives and focus on your message. Lead the interviewer rather than allowing him or her to lead you. "The root of your question is motivation...“

The Hypothetica Example: "If __ happens, what will you do?“ Solution: Avoid speculation. Turn the conversation to a positive point. "I don't have a crystal ball, but… "

The Loaded Preface Example: "Your company has been called inept by the unions. So what are you doing about the layoffs?" Solution: Try to correct the perception and then move on to the positive. "On the contrary, we..." The Absent Party Example: "So-and-so has stated that your organization is behind the times..." Solution: Don't argue with someone who is not present. Instead of commenting on that specific statement, turn to something else. "I’m not familiar with that remark, but we… "

The Inconsistency Example: "In 1997, you said _____ ; now you're doing ____ . Why the change?" Solution: Take an historical perspective. "The environment was different in 1997 and we… "

IN CONTROL

The Irrelevancy Example: "As President of XYZ Co. and an avid runner, what are you doing about running safety...?“ Solution: Give a bit of information about running and then bridge to your major issues.

Putting Words in Your Mouth Example: Did you abuse your wife? Answer: I have never abused my wife. Headline: CEO says he did not abuse wife. Solution: Do not repeat inflammatory words that a reporter might feed to you. Rather, answer in neutral terms. "That is a question that I will not dignify with an answer.

BACK

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