Questions? Questions?

Teen advisory group
Ingredients: Teens Staff advisor/ facilitator Meeting (consistency!)

Responsibilities & decision-making that affect broader group

in an asset framework
EMPOWERMENT
Community Values Youth | Young person perceives that adults in the community value youth. Youth as Resources | Young people are given useful roles in the community. Service to Others | Young person serves in the community one hour or more per week.

asset framework
SOCIAL COMPETENCIES
Planning and Decision Making | Young person knows how to plan ahead and make choices. Interpersonal Competence | Young person has empathy, sensitivity, and friendship skills.

Cultural Competence | Young person has knowledge of and comfort with people of different cultural/racial/ethnic backgrounds.
Sense of Purpose | Young person reports that "my life has a purpose."

TAB developed programming

Teen advisory group
teen library board member
"Here I was -- a 17-year-old at meetings with adult professionals. But people treated me with respect, and they respected my opinion."

Teen advisory group
“The more we increase the active participation and partnership with young people, the better we serve them. And the more comprehensively we work with them as service partners, the more we increase our public value to the entire community.”
– Carmen Martinez, Director Oakland Public Library
http://sparkaction.org/node/27408

Youth show their support local libraries at Thursday's Council meeting, which may be impacted with the mayor's budget cuts
http://oaklandlocal.com/sites/default/files/i/citycouncil2.jpg

Formalized
city-wide / local / independent

http://www.oaklandlibrary.org/links/teens/index.html

localized
Monday Nights @ Central
What are we doing tonight?? Consistency

Collaborating with “The Regulars”
More casual / spontaneous Based on interests of evolving group Play a “local” decision making role Emphasis not on “hosting” programming for peers – but implementing ideas for group

The perfect storm of “we want to cook”.

Communities of interest
A “community of interest” is a group of people who share a common passion.

Based on what you know is popular…
What do you think might be a “teen” community of interest?
(answer via chat)

anime/ manga

San Japan Reading Room

anime/ manga

San Japan Reading Room

Communities of interest
• do not rely on what you think you know (or the things YOU like… or the thing you think teens like…) • know what’s going on in your community • tap into gaps • rely on teens to tell you • add “library-ness” (mission value)

venue of interest

QUESTION #3:
Does your library have teen volunteer opportunities?

task based teen volunteers
project based volunteers

task based teen volunteers
Make it official! & Spontaneously on the spot! Assessment of interests be open to nontraditional shelving decorate teen space reviewing items working on teen blog .. (more on these later!)

task based teen volunteers
Focus on what teens are gaining…

teen volunteers
pitfalls...
not having enough for a teen volunteer to do...
colleagues who are not comfortable with teen volunteers doing anything… not having staff to train/supervise teen volunteers

project based volunteers

How Chuck Norris ate Teen Tech Week…

…and zombies invaded Teen Read Week.

Your role:
Foster and facilitate… Find resources

Develop partnerships
Grow users Build community Advocate Formalize

Programming Policy
Formalizing teen participation/ collaboration as a success measure

Making it part of your teen service mission and vision.

Programming Policy
SAPL - Teen Program Development Guidelines: •Teen Library Program development will NOT be passive – with the Library in the role of “creator” and the teen patron in the role of “attendee.” •Teen Library Programming will NOT originate from: •the interests of library personnel •library staffs’ or community members’ perception of the interests of teens •library staffs’ or adult community members’ presumption of what is “good” for teens. Teen Library Programming WILL originate from: •Teens with library staff assuming the role of facilitator and guide during the process •Teens will actively participate in program development, implementation and play a role in the decision making process.

Getting to baseline: (homework.)
Of the population served by the library, approximately what percentage is made up by teens (13 to 18)? Look at demographic/ economic information about the community you serve. What picture forms about your typical user? In your library database determine how many teens have “active” library cards. How many students attend the high school closest to your location? Based on the size of the teen population vs. the number of active teen library cards – is there potential to increase teen library usage? In the last year how many teens attended library programs? How many teen programs were offered?

You need to know…
Does your library keep separate statistics on the number and attendance of teen programs? How are teen programming decisions made in your organization? Are there teen programming guidelines/ policy/ centralization? How do teens find out about teen library programs/ activities?

Does your library have a separate budget for teen programming? If there is a budget – what is the funding amount based on?
How do you report teen programming activities to: your supervisor, administration, library board? (like statistics, narrative, or both - or other)

Questions? Questions?

jenniferjoan@gmail.com

R.I.P. “Adele”
Peace to you as you roll in the deep.

Ultimate ownership – the clean-up

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