Configuration Management Overview

Wayne Starkweather

Wayne Starkweather
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Agenda
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Purpose of Configuration Management Benefits Planning Identification Change Control Status Accounting Reviews and Audits

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Purpose and Benefits of CM

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Configuration Management process facilitates orderly management of product information and product changes Products are labeled and correlated with their associated requirements and design Product configuration is documented and a known basis for making changes is established Proposed changes are identified and evaluated for impact prior to making change decisions
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Purpose and Benefits of CM
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Configuration information captured during the product definition, change management, product build, distribution, operation and disposal processes is organized for retrieval of key product information and relationships, as needed Actual product configuration is verified against required design attributes Incorporation of changes to the product is verified and recorded throughout the life of the product

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CM Principles
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CM Planning CM Identification CM Configuration Control CM Status Accounting CM Reviews and Audits

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CM Planning (1)
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How will CM be performed on the project?
Provides Proposal Input Defines CM Activities Conducts CM Tailoring Obtains Program CM Resources Documents the CM Process on the Program Supports Work Management Plan Activities

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CM Planning (2)
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Identify and Obtain Resources
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Funding – allocated by Program Manager Staffing – allocated by Functional (CM) Manager Tools – determined by Org., CM, and Program Management Training » CM Staff » Program Personnel Facilities » Office Space » Dedicated Computers » Equipment and supplies

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CM Principles
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CM Planning CM Identification CM Configuration Control CM Status Accounting CM Reviews and Audits

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Configuration Identification
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Configuration Identification is the systematic process of selecting product attributes, organizing associated information about the attributes, and stating the attributes. Configuration Identification is the basis from which the configuration of products are defined and verified; products and documents are labeled; changes are managed; and accountability is maintained.

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Product Identifiers

Product Identifiers are assigned so that one product can be distinguished from other products; one configuration can be distinguished from another; one unit of the product can be distinguished from another; the source of a product can be determined; and the correct product information can be retrieved. Configuration Item Identification
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Issues unique numbers or identifiers for each work product Identifies changes to each work product via a revision or version Describes interfaces and relationships

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Configuration Baselines
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Configuration baselines consist of an approved document, or set of documents, or files, each of a specific revision/version and date, which define the product configuration. Configuration baselines consist of a set of one or more baselined work products which represent the approved version of a predefined collection of work products. Configuration baselines consist of the Product Definition Information that defines and describes the agreed to product attributes at a specific time. Each baseline is used to provide the basis for managing change to that set of product attributes.
(EIA-649-A National Consensus Standard for Configuration Management)
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Configuration Identification Baselines
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Functional (Requirements) Baseline

System level functional requirements (“A” Specs) Development Specifications (“B” Specs)/Performance Specs Product Specifications (“C” Specs) and drawings used to build production hardware Represents the evolving configuration of a CI Includes associated technical documentation

Allocated (Design Release) Baseline

Product (Product Configuration) Baseline

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Developmental Configuration Baseline
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CM Principle
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CM Planning CM Identification CM Configuration Control CM Status Accounting CM Reviews and Audits

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Configuration Control Board

Configuration Control, or Configuration Change Management, is a process for managing and maintaining a product and its configuration baseline, ensuring the integrity of the product and baseline by controlling all changes and variance to the product and baseline, including all elements making up the configured baseline, and resultant work products and their elements.

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Control Point by Phase

Phase O CONCEPT EXPLORATION & DEFINITION

Phase I DEMONSTRATION & VALIDATION

Phase II
ENGINEERING MANUFACTURING DEVELOPMENT

Phase III PRODUCTION & DEPLOYMENT

Phase IV OPERATIONS & SUPPORT

SRR

FUNCTIONAL
PDR

BASELINE BASELINE
CDR

ALLOCATED PRODUCT

BASELINE

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Purpose and Benefits of CCB
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Limit changes to those which are necessary or offer significant benefit Enable change decisions to be based on knowledge of complete change impact Facilitate evaluation of cost, savings & trade-offs Ensure customer interests are considered Provide orderly communication of change information Preserve configuration control at product interfaces Maintain and control of current configuration baselines Maintain consistency between product and technical documentation Facilitate continued supportability of the product after change Provides traceability of change history

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CCB Membership
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CCB Should Have Senior Representatives From All Functions Affected By Proposed Changes, In Order That Change Approval, Disapproval, or Deferral Decisions are Made With All Pertinent Factors Considered. Chairperson approves CCB Membership Membership:

sCCB

sRequired
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Chairperson, Chief Engineer Configuration Management Manufacturing/Operations Quality Engineering Disciplines

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Members (Based on change impact and program requirements)
Logistics Test Safety Parts & Materials Drafting Check Customer Representative
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– – – – – –

Conducting CCB Meetings
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CCB meetings:
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Document schedule ( place, date and time ) Verify CCB Membership quorum is present before meeting is started Review open actions from prior CCB Record CCB agenda and minutes and distribute to members Retain evidence of all CCB activities Document process for processing Walk-through and emergency changes in Program CM Plan Have change need, solution and supporting data presented Use check list to verify all factors have been considered and attach to Change Notice / Variance as a permanent record

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Proposed Change / Variance Review:
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Change Assessment Considerations
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Desirability and Technical Evaluation
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Priority

Does this change provide the right technical solution? Will lack of immediate implementation compromise Schedule, Cost, Safety, Operability, or other significant factors? Class I: Requires an ECP (perhaps preceded by an advance Change Study Notice (ACSN) or Preliminary ECP before it can be authorized, depending on contract provision Class II: Some contracts may require Approval Authority Does the change affect form , fit or function? Has interchangeability been maintained? When is the change required? Where are we in the manufacturing process?

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Classification

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Part Re-identification
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Effectivity
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Interchangeability
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Change Assessment Considerations (cont.)
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Disposition of existing hardware
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Is the hardware in inventory suitable for use? Should existing assets be scrapped, re-worked, etc.? Is the test procedure, specification, next assembly, etc. affected? Are Customers, Suppliers, manufacturing, Test Equipment, etc. affected? Is there an adverse impact on the program schedule? What is the lead time for new material? Cost of work already performed. Is the cost commensurate to the benefit? Is there a savings associated with the change?

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Related items
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Related functions Schedule Cost
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Engineering Change Documentation

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Change Classification
Characteristics of Engineering Change Factors a. Affects approved, baseline specification requirement1 (i.e., requirement would be out of the specification limits) b. Affects one or more of the following, after product baseline: Products furnished by a customer Safety Compatibility with interfacing products (including such products as test equipment, support equipment and associated software) Delivered operation or servicing instructions2 Preset adjustments3 Interchangeability or substitutability of replaceable products, assemblies, or components Change to a previously nonselected supplier, where supplier selection is specified User skills or physical attributes Operator or maintenance training c. Requires retrofit of delivered products, e.g., by product recall, modification kit installation, attrition (replacement during maintenance by modified spares), etc. Classification Major Minor (Class I) (Class II) • •

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d. Affects cost/price to customer(s) (including incentives and fees), guarantees, warranties, contracted deliveries or milestones; and is an engineering change that does not impact factors a. through c.

e. Affects configuration documentation (released design information), product or processes but does not affect factors in a. through d., above 1. Such as performance, reliability, maintainability, weight, balance, moment of inertia, interface characteristics, electromagnetic characteristics, etc. 2. For which there is no planned and funded update requirement, such as for periodic or continual maintenance of the instructions. Reference ANSI/EIA-649 3. To the extent that product identification should be changed.

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Change Effectivity Types
Exact (E) effectivity type identifies the point(s) at which a change must be implemented and before which the change is not permitted. No later than (P) effectivity type identifies the latest point at which a change must be implemented. Nonsequential implementation prior to the "N" point requires no additional configuration change control authorization although the implementation must be chronologically continuous (once in, never out). Use of the notation "NA or X" (not applicable) is only allowed for changes that have no verifiable effect on the associated hardware during manufacture, test, or acceptance.
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Engineering Change Cut-In Point
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Change Checklist
Change Control Checklist

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Variance (RDW)
•If it is necessary to TEMPORARILY depart from specific baseline requirements, a variance (deviation or waiver) shall be documented and authorized by the appropriate level of authority. •If it is decided the departure will be Permanent, an engineering change is required and is documented as an action item in CCB meeting minutes. •Recurring. The developer shall identify and minimize recurring variances. A proposed variance is considered recurring if it is a repetition or extension of a previously approved variance. If it is necessary to request a variance for the same situation more than once then the need for an engineering change, rather than a variance, shall be addressed.

Avoid Recurring Variances

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Variance Assessment Considerations
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Need

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Desirability and Technical Evaluation
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Is this variance needed to preclude a negative impact to Schedule, Cost, Safety, Operability, or other significant factors? (Note: If the corrective action is known and can be accomplished by expediting an engineering change, cancel the variance and expedite the engineering change.) Does this variance describe why the variance is required, describe the issue in adequate detail, and identify the requirement that is being taken exception to? Does this variance provide the right temporary technical solution? Does this variance defines the Corrective Action? Are Major factors impacted? If so, most contracts require Customer approval. Is this variance being applied to the appropriate hardware? Ensure the effectivity is correct and adequate, but not excessive. Is this variance written against hardware already built? If so, it should show the specific serial numbers of the hardware.

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Classification

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Effectivity
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Variance Assessment Considerations (cont.)
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Disposition of existing hardware
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Related items
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Is the hardware in inventory suitable for use? Should existing assets be scrapped, re-worked, etc.? Is the test procedure, specification, next assembly, etc. affected? Are related documents listed, e.g., a related variance, NCMD, TPR or IR. If the corrective action is a engineering change, does this variance reference the CN? Are Customers, Suppliers, manufacturing, Test Equipment, etc. affected? Is there an adverse impact on the program schedule? Is there a cost, positive or negative, associated with the variance?

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Related functions
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Schedule Cost

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Variance (RDW) Documentation

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Variance Classification
• Major - A variance is major when the departure involves any of the following: health, performance, interchangability, reliability, maintainability of the item or its repair parts, effective use of operation, weight, or appearance (when a factor) or affects Coordination, Life, Interchangeability, Function and Safety. • Minor - A variance shall be designated as minor when the departure does not involve any of the factors listed in the Major description.

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Variance Effectivity Types
Quantity Only Control - This type of effectivity is used when the only configuration control requirement is to control the quantity of items authorized by the variance. Serial Number Range - This type of effectivity is used to control the application of a variance within a specified number range and quantity. Example - Quantity of 50 from SN 150-300. Exact Serial Numbers - This type of effectivity is used when the variance must be applied to specific serial numbers. Example - SN 3,7,10, 12-22.

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Temporary departure from requirements
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RDW Checklist
RDW Checklist

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CM Principles
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CM Planning CM Identification CM Configuration Control CM Status Accounting CM Reviews and Audits

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CM Status Accounting
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Provides a system of listing, recording and reporting information necessary to manage the configuration
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Status of changes to the controlled baseline Traceability of changes to controlled baseline Support for metrics, trend analysis and configuration audits Examples: » CM Activities and Milestones Report » CR Status Report » Baseline Report

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Purpose and Benefits of Status Accounting
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Purpose of Status Accounting
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Visibility of status to Program Visibility of status to Management Ensure complete change incorporation Improved customer confidence in product Better management visibility

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Benefits of Status Accounting
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CM Principles
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CM Planning CM Identification CM Configuration Control CM Status Accounting CM Reviews and Audits

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Reviews & Audits (1)
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Configuration Verification and Audit - establish that the performance and functional requirements defined in the configuration documentation have been achieved by the design and that the design has been accurately documented in the configuration documentation.
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Ensure that the product design provides the agreed-to performance capabilities Validate the integrity of the configuration documentation Verify the consistency between a product and its configuration documentation Determine that an adequate process is in place to provide continuing control of the configuration Provide confidence in establishing a product baseline Ensure a known configuration as the basis for operation and maintenance instructions, training, spare and repair parts

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Reviews & Audits (2)
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Program Reviews – e.g. SRR, PDR, CDR, Peer Reviews Process Reviews & Audits – e.g. ISO, SEI/CMMI, Objective Evaluations (OE), Internal Audits Product Reviews & Audits – e.g. customer, FCA/PCA, OEs, Internal Audits Subcontractor Process Audits – CM reviews their plan and monitors their process to the plan Note: CM Internal Audit guidelines should include checklists for the various Internal Audits.

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Questions

Questions???

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