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Going Green
As a good start in conserving water and energy, there are a variety of other simple ways to help the environment. Below are some suggestions of things you can do. Try to recycle or reuse materials whenever you can. Aside from using recycling services, consider reusing plastic shopping bags, or bringing your own canvas bags when you go shopping. Bike or walk, whenever possible. Use energy- and water-efficient appliances and products. Donate your gently used toys and coats to a charity other people can get use out of these things and it will keep them out of landfills. Select locally grown produce whenever possible locally grown foods travel less distance, using less fuel for transport, arriving fresher at your grocery store, and supporting your local economy. Identify how youre wasting energy and water, and take steps to correct this. Find out how you can properly dispose of hazardous waste rather than letting it out into your community. Plant a tree they provide shade and are essential components of clean air Educate those around you about keeping our environment clean and using our resources efficiently knowledge is WATER & ENERGY the first step to action!

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Energy-Saving Tips of the Day


1. Plug home electronics into power strips with surge protection. Turn the strip off when the equipment is not in use. 2. Raise the thermostat to 78 degrees. 3. Replace regular light bulbs with ENERGY STAR Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFLs). CFLs use up to 75% less energy. 4. Plant deciduous trees on the south and west sides of your home to block the afternoon and evening sun. 5. Be more eco-efficient. Use a mug or glass instead of Styrofoam or paper cups. 6. Write with refillable pens made from recycled plastic. 7. Look for the ENERGY STAR label on home appliances and products. ENERGY STAR products meet strict efficiency guidelines set by the EPA. 8. Consider electric mowers and trimmers. For smaller yards, try a reel mower. 9. Consider solar-powered accent lighting for yard and garden. 10. For fax machines and printers, use refillable ink cartridges and recycle old ones.

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11. Activate your computers sleep mode when you leave your desk. This reduces electricity consumption to less than 5 percent of full power. 12. Install low-flow showerheads and faucets. Theyre inexpensive, easy to install and reduce energy and hot water use. 13. Conserve by only printing what you really need. 14. Only wash full loads of dishes in the dishwasher and use the energy-saving setting for the drying cycle (or let dishes air dry). 15. Look for a dry cleaning service with clean and green processes, including reuse of hangers and garment bags. 16. To save on water heating costs, use cold water to wash dishes and run the garbage disposal. 17. Carpool or use public transportation. If you own a business, encourage carpooling or allow telecommuting to reduce carbon emissions. 18. When building a new home, consider energy-efficient building materials. 19. Save water by repairing leaky faucets. Even a slow leak wastes more than you realize. 20. Shade air conditioning units with trees or shrubs, helping the unit run up to 10% more efficient.

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21. Defrost your manual unit freezer regularly. Frost buildup increases the amount of energy needed to keep the motor running. 22. Weather-strip and caulk around doors and windows to rid your house of drafts and prevent leaking of heated and cooled air. 23. Try to buy items that are reusable or come in reusable packaging and make sure to reuse them. 24. Look for natural furnishings that have been or can be recycled. 25. Use rechargeable batteries; they can last up to twice as long as disposables. 26. Take your lunch to work in a reusable container. 27. Install lighting occupancy sensors or timers in rooms that arent used often. 28. Choose energy efficient office machines to reduce costs and carbon emissions. 29. Conduct an online home energy audit and get personalized energy-saving tips. 30. Repair, seal and add insulation to existing heating and cooling ducts to prevent heating and cooling loss.

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31. If your primary refrigerator is at least 10 years old, consider replacing it with an ENERGY STAR qualified model. 32. Use warm or cold water for washing clothes and always use cold water for rinsing. 33. Seal around holes from pipes and wires that enter or exit your homes living space. 34. Consider replacing old windows with new high-performance, dual-pane windows. 35. Have your cooling system checked by a professional to make sure its operating at peak efficiency. 36. Add insulation to the attic. Your home should have a minimum R-30 insulation in the ceiling or attic. 37. Use dimmer switches or timers on lights. 38. Dont keep your refrigerator too cold. The ideal temperature is between 32-39. 39. Use task lighting when possible. Focus light where its needed rather than lighting an entire room. 40. Use three-way lamps. They make it easier to keep lighting levels low when bright light is not necessary.

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41. Need a new roof? Choose lighter-colored roofing to reduce heat absorption from the sun. 42. Turn off running water when shaving or brushing your teeth. 43. Consider using a gas range or oven as they cost less to operate than electric units. 44. Vacuum refrigerator coils often to keep the unit running efficiently. 45. Consider having a professional energy audit performed on your home or business. 46. Thinking about a new car? Consider a hybrid vehicle. 47. Make sure your refrigerator door seals are airtight. 48. Turn off lights when you leave a room. 49. Open crawl space vents to keep air moving and the space dry. 50. Place the washing machine near the hot water heater because water loses heat as it flows through pipes.

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51. Use a fan to help your air conditioner spread cooled air more effectively through your home without greatly increasing energy use. 52. Make sure youve insulated around recessed lights, attic doors and other places where outdoor air can sneak into your home. 53. Save on air conditioning by closing supply vents in unused rooms. (Note: If you have a heat pump, vents should be left open.) 54. If you have a pool, cover it when not in use to minimize heating costs. 55. Always wash full load of clothes or adjust the water level for smaller loads. 56. A healthy lawn is like an additional air conditioner, keep the grass green and lush. 57. Insulate water pipes coming from the water heater. 58. Draw shades or drapes to block sunlight during the hottest part of the day. 59. When youll be away from home for more than four hours, raise the thermostat 5-10 degrees or more. 60.Install a programmable thermostat and set it to adjust the temperature throughout the day.

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61. For bathrooms, hallways or bedrooms consider installing LED night lights equipped with photo sensors to keep them off during daylight hours. 62. Wrap your water heater with a water heater blanket, especially if its in an unheated area of your home. 63. Dont let kitchen or bathroom exhaust fans run longer than necessary. 64. Use the energy-saving feature on computers, monitors, printers, copiers and other business equipment. Turn them off at the end of the day.

65. Save paper, energy and money. Take the time to remove your name from mailing lists for reading materials you dont need.
66. Lower your water heater to the optimal temperature of 120125 degrees. 67. Clean or replace furnace/air-conditioning filters every month. 68. Dry only full loads of laundry and keep the dryers lint filter clean so it operates at maximum efficiency. 69. Create less heat in your home by drying clothes in the early morning or later in the evening. 70. Take showers instead of baths to save water. Use cooler water to save energy.

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71. Make sure drapes and furniture arent blocking the air supply vents in your home.

72. Clean light bulbs regularly. Grime from cooking and dust can make a light bulb dirty, reducing the light it gives off.
73. Use an automatic clothes-drying cycle instead of a timed cycle. Put in the next load quickly to make use of leftover heat. 74. Fill a dishpan with rinse water instead of letting the faucet run while you do dishes by hand.

75. Need a new dishwasher? Look for ENERGY STAR qualified models.
76. Use a pot or pan that completely covers the stoves heating element. When any part of the element is exposed, youre wasting heat and energy. 77. When considering the layout of your kitchen, dont place the refrigerator near an oven or other heat source so it will run more efficiently. 78. Take it easy on the road. Aggressive driving wastes gasoline. 79. When cooking small meals, try using a small toaster oven as opposed to a large conventional oven. 80. Get the kids to turn off the gaming console electronics when theyre not using them.

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81. Like to fall asleep with the TV on? Put the TV on a sleep timer to save energy when youre no longer awake.

82. Close the damper on your fireplace when youre not burning a fire.
83. Use a rake instead of a leaf blower to tidy up your yard. 84. Take reusable cloth bags with you to the grocery store to carry your groceries home in. 85. Use less paper by printing and copying on both sides. 86. Keep the oven door closed while cooking your meals. Each time you open the oven door, it drops the temperature 25 degrees, requiring more energy to cook your meal. 87. Keep your freezer stocked (with food or even frozen bottles of water). Freezers work more efficiently when theyre full than empty. 88. Get a water butt or bucket to collect rain water which you can later use to water your plants.

89. Make an effort to run all your errands at once, eliminating trips back and forth from your home.
90. Before you open the refrigerator or freezer door, decide what you want to eat so youre not letting cold air escape.

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91. Look into online banking and bill paying which could help lower your carbon footprint and save money on stamps. 92. Remove your AC window unit at the end of each season to prevent heating loss during the winter months. 93. When purchasing holiday lights, look for LCD lights because they use less energy than traditional light strings. 94. When you purchase your next computer, consider a laptop over a desktop as laptops use less energy.

95. When its warm outside, grill out. Cooking outside keeps the heat outside and the cool air inside.
96. Keep your range burners clean (and the reflectors) as clean burners utilize energy more efficiently. 97. It takes less energy to reheat meals than when cooking them for the first time. Try cooking larger meals and reheating the leftovers. 98. Consider placing solar film on your home windows. This can help keep the hot sun out. 99. When boiling water, make sure to place the lid on the pot. 100. Walk or ride your bike to work.

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Energy Conservation - What you can do TODAY! "When Not In Use, Turn Off the Juice!"

You do not have to do without to achieve energy savings. There is now an energy efficient alternative for almost every kind of appliance or light fixture. That means that consumers have a real choice and the power to change their energy use on a revolutionary scale. The average American produces about 40,000 pounds of CO2 emissions per year. Together we use nearly a million dollars worth of energy every minute, night and day, every day of the year. By exercising even a few of the tips in the links below, you can cut your annual emissions by thousands of pound and your energy bills by a significant amount! Energy Saving Tips for Work!: Office equipment, such as desktop printers, copiers, and lights are often overlooked when faculty and staff leave at the end of the day. Turning these items off at night and over weekends can save up to 75% of the energy they would otherwise consume.
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Every one has an opportunity to reduce energy on campus. Here are some ways do it:

Computers:
Turn off all computer equipment unless in use, especially at night and on weekends Screen savers do not save energy. Use power management features so your computer monitor and hard drive will go into "sleep mode" when not in use Turn off your monitor when you leave your desk to go to lunch or to a meeting Turn off monitors on servers Enable power management features on laser printers and/or turn off laser printers when not printing Buy low wattage equipment certified by the EPA's "EnergyStar" program and be sure to enable power management features when setting up equipment

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Lights:
Use natural lighting instead of electric lighting whenever possible Turn off unused or unneeded lights Try task lighting and reduce overhead lighting Use fluorescent bulbs in desk lamps Halogen floor lamps are very energy wasteful and may pose a safety risk

Heating and Cooling:


Dress for the season and keep thermostats set to achieve 68 - 70 degrees F in the winter and 74 - 76 degrees F for air-conditioned spaces in the summer During the cooling season close blinds, drapes and curtains to block direct sun During the heating season, open blinds, drapes and curtains to let sun in. If no sun, close them to keep the heat in especially at night Use hot water sparingly
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Equipment:
Purchase energy-efficient models Turn off all energy consuming office and research equipment when not in use, e.g. copiers, refrigerators, environmental rooms, fume hood, etc.

Report Energy Waste:


Please help us by reporting instances of building malfunctions or energy waste to the Work Control Center at 5-5071

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Typical Home Energy Use Most of the energy used at home, 45%, comes from heating and cooling systems.
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Energy Saving Tips for Home: Heating:
Set your home thermostat to a temperature as low as comfortable (65 - 68 degrees F is suggested) when the house is occupied Set back your thermostat by as much as 10 degrees F at night or when the house is unoccupied during the day Set back the thermostat to 50 - 55 degrees F when the house is unoccupied for over 24 hours

Install a programmable thermostat to automatically provide the setbacks mentioned above


Close the fireplace damper - except during fireplace use Reduce heat to unused rooms in the house by closing doors and heat registers

Replace furnace filters once a month during the heating season


Keep objects away from and clean heating registers regularly Have certified maintenance personnel service and check your furnace regularly Minimize the use of kitchen, bath, and & ENERGY WATER other ventilating fans or install a timer switch on them CONSERVATION COMMITTEE

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Install insulating gaskets behind electrical outlets and switch plates on exterior walls

Caulk and weather strip doors and windows Caulk and seal leaks where plumbing, ducting or electrical wiring penetrates through exterior walls, floors, and ceiling Upgrade ceiling insulations to R-36 (higher R values mean greater insulation levels and thus more energy savings) Insulate exterior heated basement walls to at least R-11 Insulate floors over unheated areas to R-19

Install storm windows over single pane windows Replace aging furnace, when needed, with an energy efficient model Replace single pane windows with energy efficient double pane windows mounted in non-conducting window frames WATER & ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE

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Cooling:

Open windows at night to bring in cool night air; close them during the day Close drapes during the day Shade west facing windows Draw cool night air into the house with a whole house fan Use room air conditioning only where needed and install energy efficient models Install a central system air conditioner only when whole house air condition is needed Maintain an air conditioned house at 78 degrees F or higher using a programmable thermostat to set the temperature higher during the day when no one is home Regularly change air conditioning system filters and clean the condenser Plant deciduous shade trees on the west and south sides of your house

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Hot Water:

Repair leaky faucets Reduce the temperature setting of your water heater to warm (120 degrees F) Install low-flow showerheads Add an insulating blanket to your water heater Wash clothes in warm or cold water using the appropriate water level setting for the load Replace water heater, when needed, with an energy efficient model

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Major & Small Appliances:
Maintain refrigerator at 37 - 40 degrees F and freezer at 5 degrees F

For cooking small meals, use toaster ovens or microwaves


Adjust the flame on gas cooling appliances so it's blue, not yellow Replace a gas cooling appliance with a unit with an automatic, electric ignition system Run the dishwasher in the evening with a full load of dishes Air dry dishes in a dishwasher Regularly clean the lint filter on your dryer and inspect the dryer vent to ensure it is not blocked Shut down home computers when not in use Select appliances (i.e. curling irons, coffee pots, irons) with time limited shut off switches Replace aging major appliances, TVs and VCRs when needed, with energy efficient models Compare the annual energy consumption and operating cost for each appliance by looking at the bright-yellow and black Energy Guide label when shopping for new appliances

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Lighting: Turn off light when not in use Use task lighting whenever possible instead of overhead lighting Install compact fluorescent lamps (CFPs) in fixtures

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Energy Conservation - Make a Difference Today!
Why Conserve Energy? Conservation (n.) - using less energy. The reduction or avoidance of energy loss or waste by various means. Why should you care? Whenever we save energy, we not only save money, we also reduce the demand for such fossil fuels as coal, oil, and natural gas. Less burning of fossil fuels also means lower emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), the primary contributor to global warming, and other pollutants. It is our responsibility to be good stewards of the earth's resources for future generations. When the University saves energy, it save dollars. Students who attend the University of Iowa currently pay a surcharge of $100 per semester, part of which goes toward purchasing energy. As part of the surcharge agreement, students are encouraged to work with University administration to lead an effort to reduce energy consumption on the campus. It is just as important for faculty and staff to conserve energy in order to meet campus needs.c

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REVISED ENERGY CONSERVATION TIPS
We still need to conserve energy! YOU can make a difference. Here's some conservation tips on how you can help:

Lighting Turn off lights in unoccupied rooms. Turn off unnecessary overhead lighting where more than one light switch exists. Task lighting typically uses more energy than overhead lighting. Avoid using both at the same time. Dim lights where dimmers are available. Appliances Limit the use of small appliances, such as heaters, fans, and desk fountains. Battery operated appliances are a great option. Turn off coffee pots by noon daily.
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Office Equipment Use email as an alternative for copying or faxing documents, whenever possible. Activate the energy saving or "sleep" mode on computers and copiers. Use laptop computers and ink jet printers, if available, since they use 90% less energy than desktop and laser printers. Turn off office equipment such as personal computers, monitors, printers, and copiers at the end of the day and when not needed for an extended period (2 hours or more.) Other (Miscellaneous) Limit use of passenger elevators by using stairs when possible. Close drapes and blinds to keep heat/cold out. Thank you for your cooperation in meeting conservation goals and helping reduce the need for rolling blackouts.
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REVISED Fall and Winter 2002 Energy Conservation Tips for Home
Continuing to conserve energy is everyone's responsibility, both at home and at work. Here are MORE tips to save money on utility bills AND to conserve energy at home. Lighting Turn the lights OFF whenever not needed. Replace incandescent bulbs with Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) where there is infrequent usage. Refrigerators - Adjust the air balance on late model side-by-side refrigerators to 38 (refrigerator side) and zero (freezer side). Cooking - Follow these priorities for energy sources when cooking: gas stove, microwave oven, electric stove. Heating Install a programmable thermostat. Remember to set your thermostat to 55 or less at night or when you are not home, and to 68, health permitting, during the day. Water Heater - Lower your hot water heater to 120 unless your dishwasher requires a higher setting. Laundry Try to wash after 7 P.M. on weekdays, using full loads of clothes to maximize the use of appliances. Use the cold water setting on your washer. Make sure to clean the dryer lint trap after each use and the moisture-sensing automatic drying setting, if you have this feature.
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Computer - Check your computer's power management feature. If you are using Windows 98/ME2000, set your computer to go to sleep when you are away (from 5 to 15 minutes). If you have a Macintosh, check the Control Panel setting called "Energy Saver". And, when you are done using your computer, turn it off. Dishwashing Try to use the dishwasher after 7 P.M. on weekdays, making sure that the dishwasher is full. The dishwasher actually uses less water and energy than it takes to wash dishes in the sink. Use air-dry setting instead of heat dry on dishwashers. House Fans - Use your house fans (kitchen and bathroom) as little as possible and don't forget to close fireplace dampers when not in use to prevent warm air from escaping to the outside.

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Tired of breathing dirty air? Well, you can help reduce air pollution.
Every time you drive to work or school, use your heater or air conditioner, clean your windows or even style your hair, you make choices that can reduce or increase air pollution. This pamphlet shows you how to reduce air pollution. When more people make clean air their business, we'll all breathe easier.

Drive Less
In California, about half the air pollution comes from cars and trucks. Two big ways to reduce air pollution are to drive less, even a little less, and to drive smart. Fewer trips in your car or truck will help cut air pollution. And how you drive can reduce your car's air pollution contribution. Driving less doesn't mean you have to stay home. Try combining driving with other ways of getting where you want to go:
1. Carpool. 2. Walk or ride a bike. 3. Shop by phone or mail. 4. Ride public transit. 5. Telecommute.

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Drive Smart
Driving smart keeps pollution at a minimum:

6. Accelerate gradually.
7. Use cruise control on the highway. 8. Obey the speed limit. 9. Combine your errands into one trip. 10. Keep your car tuned and support the Smog Check Program. 11. Don't top off at the gas pump. 12. Replace your car's air filter. 13. Keep your tires properly inflated. 14. Report smoking vehicles. That's not all. When shopping for your next car... 15. Look for the most efficient, lowest polluting model or even a zero-polluting electric And if you must drive on days with unhealthy air... 16. Drive your newest car. Newer cars generally pollute less than older models.

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Choose Air-Friendly Products
Many products you use in your home, in the yard, or at the office are made with smogforming chemicals that escape into the air when you use them. Here's a few ways to put a lid on products that pollute: 17. Select products that are water-based or have low amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). 18. Use water-based paints. Look for paints labeled zero-VOC. 19. Paint with a brush, not a sprayer. 20. Store solvents in air-tight containers. 21. Use a push or electric lawn mower.

22. Start your barbecue briquettes with an electric probe. Or use a propane or natural gas barbecue.

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Save Energy
Saving energy helps reduce air pollution. Whenever you burn a fossil fuel, you pollute the air. Use less gasoline, natural gas, and electricity (power plants burn fossil fuels to generate electricity): 23. Turn off the lights when you leave a room. 24. Replace energy-hungry incandescent lights with fluorescent lighting. 25. Check with your utility company for energy conservation tips.

26. Use a programmable thermostat that automatically turns off the air conditioner or heater when you don't need them.
27. Add insulation to your home. 28. Use a fan instead of air conditioning. 29. Use an EPA-approved wood burning stove or fireplace insert. 30. Microwave small meals. 31. Insulate your water heater. 32. Install low-flow shower heads. WATER & ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE

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Waste Not
It takes energy to make and sell the products we use. Here are ways to cut energy use, reduce air pollution, and save money.
33. Choose recycled products. 34. Choose products with recyclable packaging. 35. Reuse paper bags. 36. Recycle paper, plastics, and metals.

37. Print and photocopy on both sides of paper.

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Watch Out for the Small Stuff
When you breathe, very small particles such as dust, soot, and acid droplets can slip past your lung's natural defense system. These particles get stuck deep in your lungs and may cause problems increased asthma attacks, more bronchitis and other lung diseases, less resistance to infections, and even premature death for the elderly or people who are already ill. Here are a few things you can do to reduce PM10 pollution and protect yourself:

38. Don't use your wood stove or fireplace on days with unhealthy air. 39. Avoid using leaf blowers and other types of equipment that raise a lot of dust. Try using a rake or broom. 40. Drive slowly on unpaved roads. 41. Drive less, particularly on days with unhealthy air. 42. Avoid vigorous physical activity on days with unhealthy air.

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Air pollution is a problem indoors and out. Most people spend at least 80 percent of their lives indoors. Here are some ways you can reduce pollution in your home, office, or school: 43. Don't smoke. If someone must smoke, send them outdoors. 44. Some products such as cleaning agents, paints, and glues contain dangerous chemicals. Use them outdoors or with plenty of ventilation indoors. 45. Use safer products, such as baking soda instead of harsher cleaners. 46. Don't heat your home with a gas cooking stove.

47. Have your gas appliances and heater regularly inspected and maintained.
48. Clean frequently to remove dust and molds.
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THANK YOU!
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