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Banana and Water Hyacinth Fiber as Wood Pulp for Insulating Material

Researchers: Czareen Elan Gener Ivy Joyce Java Angelika LIghbaoan Jonathan Ario Jericho Aguiatan

Statement of the Problem


This study aims to define the significant difference of utilizing banana and water hyacinth fibers as wood pulp for insulating materials as compared to the commercially available wood or Styrofoam insulation.

Significance of the Study


In a tropical country like the Philippines, summer can be very hot thus, higher electrical consumption. Increasing the rating of insulation in the walls, ceilings and floor of the house will permanently reduce ones energy needs; Some insulating materials can be expensive. Thus, this research aims to provide an alternative, inexpensive, readily available materials for consumers to use.

Hypotheses
Null Hypothesis There is no significant difference between the banana and water hyacinth insulator and the commercially available insulators in terms of absorption of heat and durability. Operational Hypothesis There is a significant difference in terms of texture and appearance of the samples to commercially available insulating materials.

Scope and Limitations


This study focuses on the use of Water Hyacinth and Banana Trunk Fibers as wood pulp to produce a plywood or board for household insulation. The finished product will be tested for heat insulating capacity, texture, appearance, durability and fire proofing capacity.

Methodology
A. Preparation of Raw Materials Approximately one kilogram of dried banana trunks were obtained and reduced to chips of dimensions 1x10.5. The same amount of hyacinth were gatheres and sliced into small pieces. 80mL of glue solution, (50mg) sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and 120mL sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) were prepared.

Methodology
B. Pulping of Samples The caustic soda process was used during the pulping. The sun-dried banana and water hyacinth were separately cooked with 500mL of 20% sodium hydroxide solution for 15 minutes over high heat.

Methodology
C. Beating and Refining of Pulp The pulps were subjected to beating over two minutes using a high-speed blender. Beating for the different pulps were done separately. After beating, the pulps were made to pass through a sieve to remove impurities.

Methodology
D. Mixing the Additives The pulps were molded into lumps. They were mixed together in varying ratios to produce different sapmples. Three types of samples were produced. The ratios of the samples were: Sample A- 75% banana pulp and 25% water hyacinth Sample B- 50% banana pulp and 50% water hyacinth Sample C- 25% banana pulp and 75% water hyacinth Sample D- 80% banana pulp and 20% water hyacinth

Methodology
Glue, Alum and sodium bicarbonate were added to make up 1%, 2% and 3% respectively of the weight of mixture of the different samples.

Methodology
E. Boardmaking The different pulp mixtures were separately suspended in basins, each containing one liter tap water. The mixtures were stirred using a ceramic spoon to evely mix the pulp mixture in water. A strainer was again used to remove extra water content. These mixtures were molded in aluminum pans with labels and were exposed to the sun for drying.

Results, Analysis and Interpretation of Data


Testing the Feasibility of Banana Trunk and water hyacinth fibers as wood pulp for insulating materials:

Panelist

Appearance
Sample A Sample B Sample C Sample D Average

Table 1: Evaluation of Panelist on the Appearance of Wood Pulp as Insulating Material

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Panelist

Durability
Sample A Sample B Sample C Sample D Average

Table 2:
Evaluation of Panelist on the Durability of Wood Pulp as Insulating Material

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Panelist

Texture
Sample A Sample B Sample C Sample D Average

Table 3: Evaluation of Panelist on the Texture of Wood Pulp as Insulating Material

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations