Working With The Media

Chartered Institute of Public Relations

Leeds Metropolitan University
Robert Minton-Taylor
(Associate Senior Lecturer) Friday, 15 February 2008

Leeds Business School

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Timetable
• • • • • • • • •

– Friday, 15 February 2008

09.00 hrs Coffee 09.15 hrs Media Relations 10.45 Coffee 11.00 hrs Media Relations (contd) 12.30 hrs Lunch 13.30 hrs PR Writing 15.00 hrs Tea 15.15 hrs PR Writing (contd) 16.15 hrs Close

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

The Media Menu
Starter -- Survey of Business Journalists -- Review of Press, Broadcast and New Media Intermediate Course -- Role of the Media -- News Awareness - What Is News? & What Makes a Good Story -- News Release Distribution -- News Release Hints and Tips Main Course -- Creating Media Opportunities -- Media Relations Techniques -- How to Improve Your Media Targeting – News Releases -- Executive Interviews -- News/Press Conferences & Editor Briefings -- Photo Calls and Photo Stories Dessert -- 10 Things About Journalists

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations How Good Are We At Communicating With The Media?
Survey of Business Journalists In Yorkshire

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Survey: What Was Done?
• 15 business journalists working for daily papers and key radio stations in Yorkshire surveyed via email questionnaire • Asked their views on how effective organisations are at communicating with them • Survey conducted in January-February 2008 • 65% response rate from journalists

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Survey: Questions Asked
Business journalists were asked four questions 2. How well do PR executives know your media? 3. Do PR executives understand the media’s editorial needs? 4. Are PR executives effective in supplying you with newsworthy information 5. What % of press releases produce a story?

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

1 Survey: Answers
• How well do PR executives know your media?

59% said they knew the media well

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

2

Survey: Answers

• Do public relations executives understand the media’s editorial needs?

Only 35% said Yes

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

3

Survey: Answers

• Are PR executives effective in supplying you with newsworthy information?

Just 62% said Yes

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

4

Survey: Answers

• What % of press releases produce a story?
(Remember we were not asking here whether a press release submitted to the media was used in part, or in its entirety, but simply whether it provided ‘food for thought’ for the journalist to write a story or feature!)

Only 15% of press releases were used!
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations Press, Broadcast and New Media
Yes I know you have done this before, but this is a reprise for those of you who have a memory lapses – like me! (Mine’s like a sieve, but no doubt yours is miles better!)

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

UK Print Media
The UK is one of the world’s biggest and most diverse media markets • 10 national dailies and 10 Sunday papers • 3,253 regional dailies and weeklies • 7,568 magazines - consumer and business • 1,577 directories and annuals • 500 foreign correspondents registered with the Foreign Press Association in London • 105 news agencies - national and regional

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

State of the UK Media
Top 10 media events in 2006
• • • • • • • • • • ITV share price plummets, Greg Dyke launches failed takeover bid, chief executive resigns, Michael Grade poached from BBC Sky launches broadband Google Buys You Tube Newspapers go “web fist” with news Daily and Sunday Telegraph editors are both replaced Capital Radio (London) drops to no 3 in London from no 1 Telegraph group cuts 130 jobs BBC plans to cuts another 4,000 jobs Both the London Evening Standard and News International launch free London newspapers to complete with Metro Internet revue advertising revenue reach $5.8 billion for the first half of the year

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

UK Print Media
• 66% of the British public read a daily paper regularly • Circulation ranges from The Sun with a daily circulation of around 3.16 million to The Independent with just 0.25 million a day • While national newspaper sales are generally falling, regional and local papers are seeing a revival

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

UK Print Media
National newspaper ownership
Group
News International

Share Titles
34.4% Sun, Times, Sunday Times, News of the World Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday Daily Mirror, Sunday Mirror, People Daily Express, Daily Star, Sunday Express, Daily Star Sunday Daily Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph Guardian, Observer Financial Times Independent, Independent on Sunday

Daily Mail & General Trust 20.5% Trinity Mirror 15.1% Northern and Shell 13.5% Telegram Group Guardian Media Group Pearson Independent Newspapers 7.5% 3.4% 3.3% 2.2%

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

UK Broadcast Media
The UK is one of Europe’s biggest and most diverse television markets • 474 TV and radio stations - national and regional including cable & satellite TV, BBC and independent stations. (There were just three in 1982) • Continuing popularity of local radio especially in the growth of local radio stations • Over 40 television correspondents registered with the Foreign Press Association in London

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

New Media
What Is New Media?
• New Media is the latest form of mass communication • In years past it was radio, television, cable TV, satellite TV, etc. • It tends to be used primarily to talk about emerging digital/electronic communications forms, particularly the internet and the web.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

New Media
• It now includes all forms of computer-enhanced communication. • In addition to digital video, examples of New Media are web sites, emails, CD-ROMs, DVDs, streaming audio & video, interactive multimedia presentations, and computer animation. • New Media is a convergence of the older styles of communicating with the new, computer-enhanced styles. • Digital information service management and delivery systems e.g. America On Line (AOL)
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

New Media
• Electronically digital interactive & e-commerce TV broadcast websites, internet broadcasters, internet kiosks and booking services etc • Issues no of hits, pages seen, site traffic etc • Best place to look for New Media is http://media.guardian.co.uk • Is big business – e.g. in Leeds there are reputed to be over 1,000 companies involved in New Media • Rapid growth of online sources since 1993
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

Role Of The Media

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Media Roles
• In a consumer democracy, the media is not there to communicate on behalf of government or commercial interests • The media is there to inform, entertain, and to champion the people by acting as a filter on commercial messages or government spin

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Media Roles
• ‘Gatekeeper’ of public information
• Challenger of those in authority • Impartial observer • Teller of truths

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Media Roles – and also
• • • • • Trade in stories - in words, pictures and sound Are businesses Balance profit against loss Are corporate concerns Have company structures

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Media Roles – and also
Are not primarily an information or education service. Their job is to: • Attain • Retain • Increase – readers, viewers, listeners

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

News Awareness
What Is News?

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Is News?
• “Essentially journalism is a matter of instinct, the expression of primitive curiosity and an instinctive urge to cause trouble, to be difficult, coupled with a distrust of anyone in authority.”
Jeremy Paxman, author and BBC Newsnight presenter

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Is News?
• “When a dog bites a man, that is not news, because it happens so often. But if a man bites a dog, that is news.”
Quote from John A Bogart in F.M O’Brien’s book Story of the [New York] Sun (1918), Chapter 10

• “What somebody, somewhere wants to suppress.
All the rest is advertising.”
Lord Northcliffe, one of Britain’s foremost press barons

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Is News?
• “I read the newspapers avidly. It is my one form of continuous fiction.”
Aneurin Bevan, The Times, 29 March 1960

• “A good newspaper, I suppose, is a nation talking to itself.”
Arthur Miller, The Observer, 26 November 1961

• "...news is history in its first and best form, its vivid and fascinating form, and...history is the pale and tranquil reflection of it.“
Mark Twain's Autobiography

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Is News?
• “Yesterday’s newspaper is used to wrap fish and yesterday’s broadcast does not exist at all.”
Martin Mayer, Broadcast journalist, Focus Press, 1994

• “News is important, helpful, informative, relevant, interesting, new and unusual.”
Gaven Morris, News Editor, CNN (London)

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Is News?
• “A significant new development, event or trend which will have an important impact on our viewers, or be of interest to them.”
Peter Barrow, deputy news editor, Channel 4 News, ITN

• “It is people talking and people doing. Committees and cabinets and courts are people. So are fires, accidents and planning decisions. They are only news because they involve and affect people.”
Harold Evans, former editor of The Sunday Times and now a senior American newspaper executive

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Is News?
• “Conflict makes good copy for journalists – war, strikes, even disputes between neighbours. So do sleaze, corruption, scandals, sex, the royals, abuses of power & lottery winners. They all involve people.”
Martin Deller in the UNISON Press Office

• “News is what a chap who doesn’t care much about anything wants to read. And it’s only news until he’s read it. After that it’s dead.”
Evelyn Waugh, Scoop Book 1, Chapter 5, 1938

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Is News?
• “Some news is hard to see, generally because the clues are hidden or disguised. By accident, or on purpose. Other news hits you in the face. Like Watergate, for instance. It began with five guys in business suits, wearing dark glasses, surgical gloves, carrying tear-gas fountain pens, and cameras entering the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee in Washington. It ended with the jailing of 40 people, including the Attorney General of the United States, and the White House chief of staff. You would have to be Richard Nixon himself to say that this was not news.“
Ben Bradlee, former executive editor, The Washington Post
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News is ... (or should be)
• Different, unusual, unique, novel • New - “News Is Only News While It Is New”, Andrew Boyd, writer and TV journalist • Controversial • Dramatic • Impactful (in TV terms it must also be very visual) • Relevant to many • Extreme - very sad, very happy, very serious, very silly • Conflict - “a row was brewing last night ...”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News is ... (or should be)
What really makes a story newsworthy? • “The unusual and unexpected often make interesting news. • “Newsworthiness is critical – a story that has an impact on 'everyone.' • “E.g. the global outpouring of sympathy when Pope John Paul II died. Those that went to St. Peter's Square and tuned in on television were not all members of the Catholic faith. They mourned a man that had managed to reach out to people of many faiths.”
Martin Deller in the UNISON Press Office

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News is ... (or should be)
• Entertainment or celebrity often garner instant newsworthiness. • Viewers were glued to their television sets as OJ Simpson led a squad of police cars down an L.A. highway in a white Ford Bronco. • A few months ago just as many people are following the daily reports of the case against Michael Jackson. • And yesterday we watched Pete Doherty, front man of the group Babyshambles sentenced to 12 months of community service Wednesday for possessing drugs.
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News is ... (or should be)
• The words that seem to repeat over and over again are story and interest. • Ultimately, it's all about the story and how you package it. • An awareness of the components of what makes a story newsworthy will help your CIPR workshop participants become successful in getting their key messages to the right audiences.
Martin Deller in the UNISON Press Office
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News is ... (or should be)
However, there's news and news. • Great news stories begin with a single line of copy: "Ferry with 1400 people on board is reported to have sunk in the Red Sea". • That news is added to bit by bit to keep initial readers watching, and fresh readers keen to find out. "Egyptian ferry believed to have caught fire before it capsized and sank." • The best news is when the agency's own reporter is there on scene bringing fresh insight: "Fairplay has been told the Al Salam 98, which sank with the loss of 1,000 lives, failed to send out a mayday message".
Richard Clayton, News Editor, Fairplay International Shipping Weekly

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News is ... (or should be)
Bear in mind • news must be fast and first and, as far as possible, accurate. • If you wait for confirmation, rivals will get the story out and hook the reader. • News should always be fresh, and make the reader think they haven't read this piece of information anywhere else. • The Internet has meant that bits of news and comment are lifted and inserted into news reports across the globe without any obligation to check, source correctly or add value.
Richard Clayton, News Editor, Fairplay International Shipping Weekly

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Involves
Events Crime Business Gossip Money Religion Politics Science Sex RelationshipsRoyalty Personalities Travel Education Art Environment Scandal Food and Drink Sport Showbiz ?

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News is … a manufactured product
• Disasters, elections, strikes, scandals HAPPEN. • News is MADE.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Features Are ...
• Features are longer stories But unlike hard news stories they are ... • Usually planned in advance • Deeper and broader • Backgrounders, analyses and commentaries • Interpretive • Anecdotal

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News and Feature Sources
Other media + Websites + Newspaper cuttings + PR Consultants + Freelancers + Stringers + News Agencies + Companies + Government bodies + Emergency services + Experts + Academics + Politicians + Members of the public + Trade unions/professional bodies + Pressure groups + Employees + Local authorities + Competitors + Parents + The General Public on Mobile Phones, Digital Cameras
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News and Features Are ...
• Picked • Processed • Packaged selected from a range moved through a production system targeted and marketed for an audience

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

News Awareness
What Makes A Good Story?

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
Defining News
• Defining news is a difficult task. • However many of the journalists I have spoken to agree on roughly the following eight elements as to What Is News?

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
1. Immediacy
• Reporting something that has just happened or is about to happen. Time is a strong ingredient i.e. today, yesterday, early this morning, tomorrow. The newness of the occurrence makes-up the "immediacy" element of news.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
2. Proximity
• Facts and occurrences that are important to the reader, listener or viewer e.g. car accident close to your home, a fire in your neighbourhood etc. • The question most asked by journalists is: "If this happened outside my immediate town/city, county, would I be interested in reading about it?" • You must "take off the I love this organisation hat" and examine your story to see if indeed it would interest other readers.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
3. Prominence
• Prominence as a news element is well-known to most of us. • Holders of public office, people of renown or those who stimulate our curiosity, people in positions of influence all enjoy news prominence e.g. Kate Moss, David Cameron. • To qualify for news prominence, the person must be well enough known to command the attention of readers either by reputation or by the nature of the topic to be discussed.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
4. Oddity
• Oddity is often news. The bizarre, the unusual, the unexpected often make news. • Generally those people who perform striking feats in emergency situations are news e.g. lifting an automobile off her child, travelling around the world in a yacht, your council using unusual recycling methods etc • In journalism, oddity is defined as the "man bites dog" formula.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
5. Conflict
• Conflict is one element most observed in today with the clash of ideologies making headlines worldwide e.g. between Christians and Moslems. • However, remember that most businesses and organisations shy away from the reporting of conflict, but you need to remember that this element is firmly based in the news formula.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
6. Suspense
• Suspense creates and expands news appeal. The outcome of the Iraq hostage situation is suspenseful news. • For the most part, organizations would rarely experience this type of circumstance. It is helpful to remember that news suspense is not the same as mystery suspense. • However, mystery suspense in news does occur when a crime has been committed and the search is on for a suspect.
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
7. Emotions
• Emotions are a news element commonly called "human interest" stories that stir our recognition of the basic needs both psychological and physical. • Organisations should be alert to the possibilities of "human interest" stories e.g. the employees that has raised thousands of pounds for charity etc.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
8. Consequence
• The last element of news, consequence, is more difficult to explain, but generally for a story to have consequence
– It must be important to a great number of readers, viewers and listeners. – It must have some impact for the public.

• Such news will affect the public in some personal way e.g. safety of a bus after an accident; dumping of toxic chemicals in a river affecting the water supply etc. • How it affects the public – the consequence of it now and in the future.
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
      Impact - Facts and events that have the greatest effect/impact. Weight - The significance of a particular fact/event with respect to other facts or events. Controversy - Arguments, debates, increase the value of news. Emotion – Human interest that touch emotions. The Unusual - When a dog bites a man it's not news. But when a man bites a dog, it is news. Prominence - More prominent individuals get more attention.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
 Proximity - Concentrate on news that is of local interest; the closer to your home and/or place of work the better. 8. Timeliness - Emphasize what is new. 9. Currency (of information) - Take into account what is on people's minds at the particular time. 10. Usefulness - Help people answer questions, resolve problems. 11. Educational Value - Make readers, viewers and/or listeners more knowledgeable rather than merely informed.
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Makes A Good Story?
In Conclusion
• Bear these guidelines in mind when you're deciding if your storyline for your press release or news announcement. • Whether it is a feature or an item of limited public interest e.g. a short news press release e.g. appointment of a new company director etc.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Print vis a vis Broadcast
• Primary difference – the visual appeal of TV news allow it to take on a personal nature. • The intimacy of the broadcast medium is enhanced by the images of reporters. • Unless print journalists appear on television they remain faceless to the public. • Viewers become familiar with the newscasters/reporters' faces. They develop a ‘relationship’ with these reporters, which in turn builds trust in the news being delivered e.g. Nick Robinson, chief political correspondent, BBC.
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Print vis a vis Broadcast
• The first element in any news story is the lead. The lead hangs on a ‘peg’ serving as a hook to draw in the audience and make the story more relevant to them. • In print journalism the ‘peg’ is composed of the most "newsworthy" fact. • But in a television broadcast the visual element is essential to the story's construction.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Print vis a vis Broadcast
• The lead tends to be structured around the most compelling TV footage available. • Newspapers' limited space does not allow for many visuals, the majority of space is required for text. • Newspapers are limited by space restrictions, in TV time is of the essence. • However, timeliness remains an important value in both mediums.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Print vis a vis Broadcast
• TV has the visual advantage. • Audiences can be transported through time and space to the scene of the news. • Newspapers can only reproduce an image through the text and ‘still’ photographs. • Once a newspaper is printed it cannot be updated until the next edition. • TV news can be broadcast several times during the day and emergency updates can be aired when deemed necessary.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Online Journalism
• Online journalism presents a new challenge. • Largest difference between online news and traditional print and broadcast mediums, is the readers' ability in online journalism to define and redefine the structure of the news. • News can be retrieved from the Guardian website http://www.guardian.co.uk/ in several different ways. • It is labelled as in the print version. • But, in Guardian Unlimited the reader is also invited to read sections such as Life & Health, Jobs, Money, Politics, Science, Shopping, etc

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Online Journalism
• The nature of the Internet increases the value of timeliness. • Due to production costs, print newspapers face severe time restrictions; once an edition is printed it cannot be updated until the next edition. • Television is more flexible. News broadcasts are made at several times throughout the day and updates e.g. ‘breaking’ news can be made during regularly scheduled programmes when news dictates e.g. London 7/7.
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Online Journalism
• Online communication allows the news to be updated at a moments notice continually throughout the day without interrupting other communication. • The Guardian Unlimited and more famously the BBC News website http://news.bbc.co.uk utilise the dynamic capabilities of the internet medium to reflect the most timely news during the day.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Online Journalism
• While the function of online newspapers remains the same - to disseminate news to the public, the unlimited space available to online sites means that items that are less newsworthy can be included. • These additional items tend to stress the traditional values of news as well fun stories e.g. Guardian Unlimited site includes News blogs and fun items such as ‘Been there’, ‘Soulmates dating’ and ‘Style guide’.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Differences Between Media
Online Journalism
• These forums allow readers to contribute their own ideas to the site. • They give minority opinions a voice in the media and expose readers to ideas, values, and beliefs that may differ from their own. • While the user may not choose to accept other users' views, they can make people revaluate their own set of beliefs and how the news fits in to them. • Often forums are directly linked to the news stories.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

The Nature Of Television News
• “It’s dramatic, because you have got to work hard for an audience. When you buy a newspaper you have made a conscious decision to read it. You have to listen to radio to hear it. With television you can be doing a million and one other things. TV is chewing gum for the eyes.”
Mr Jonathan Boddy MCIPR, Director, Positive Impact Comms & Training Ltd

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

The Nature Of Television
• “It’s fast moving. An episode of ‘Coronation Street’ lasts for 23 minutes - minus the advertisements. There are around 30 scenes an episode and many more camera angles. Less than a minute is devoted to each scene.”
Mr Jonathan Boddy MCIPR, Director, Positive Impact Comms & Training Ltd

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

News Release Hints and Tips

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Release – Dos
• “Contact news desk in advance of issuing your story – for broadcast media you need to give them the essence of your story 10 days in advance - having made sure first that you have their right names and numbers .” • “Know the press deadlines and fix the issue of the news release to suit them.” • “Stick to those times otherwise coverage will be affected.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Release – Dos
• Make sure your story has wide interest – check the profile of the paper, magazines, radio or TV station.” • Adapt your press release for different media and different audiences.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

CONSUMER MEDIA – TRANSPORT CORRESPONDENTS UK NATIONALS 15 February 2008

SWEDEN’S LARGEST ECO-FRIENDLY CAR CARRIER SETS SAIL
15 February 2008, Stockholm, Sweden - At 71,583 gross tons, twice the length of a premiership football pitch, and the height of a 10 storey building, Sweden’s largest car carrying ship, MV Fidelio cuts an impressive figure at sea. Carrying 8,000 cars, and with a deck capacity the size of nine football pitches, MV Fidelio is also being billed as the world’s largest car carrying ship. She is also one of the ‘greenest’. Built with a focus on environmental protection, MV Fidelio boasts a “Green Passport” from the International Maritime Organisation* for her green credentials. Her cutting-edge design cuts harmful emissions into the atmosphere by 15 per cent per unit of cargo transported. Creature comforts have not been forgotten either. A two-storey glass atrium ensures maximum daylight into the crew's quarters and when off-duty the crew make use of a digital satellite TV room, gymnasium, sauna and outdoor swimming pool. Safety at sea is crucial, and apart from the latest state of the art navigation system, the ship boasts anti-collision computers and each crew member has their own survival suit in addition to an all enclosed free-falling life boat and a high speed rescue boat.
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

SHIPPING MEDIA 15 February 2008

MV FIDELIO - SWEDEN’S LARGEST CAR CARRIER ENTERS SERVICE
15 February 2008, Stockholm, Sweden - MV Fidelio, a 8,000 units Large Car and Truck Carrier (LCTC), is the latest addition to the Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics (WWL) fleet. She was christened today (Friday, February 15) by Ms Chisato Nagatani wife of the managing director of Toyota at a naming ceremony in Yokohama, Japan. The vessel is the second in a series of five LCTCs ordered by WWL and built at Daewoo Shipyard and Marine Engineering in Korea. The first, MV Faust was delivered in May this year and the remaining three vessels will be delivered in February, August and October 2008. MV Fidelio is equipped with a state of the art technology regarding ship design and environmentally friendly alternatives. Due regard has been paid to safety issues, communication equipment and the reduction of environmental impact from the vessel. She is is equipped with PureBallast, the world’s first IMO approved Ballast Water Treatment system. PureBallast has been developed in a joint venture between Wallenius Marine subsidiary Wallenius Water and AlfaLaval. The new ship has also been equipped with a “Green Passport”, a "declaration of contents", in which all materials and substances used onboard are listed.
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

News Release Distribution

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Release Distribution Dos
• I favour news distribution via email, but ensure copy is contained on one screen i.e. so you don't have to scroll down the page • Put punchy headline in Subject box • Personalise email to the particular journalist • Don’t rely solely on media distribution lists – they are usually out of date, devise your own • Don’t mass mail, target your communications to the media you think you have a hope of getting coverage in • Ensure you put contact details on top of release and have an out-of-office hours number too
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Release Distribution – Don’ts
• “Think you know all about a newspaper just because you read it or TV just because you have seen the BBC’s Ten O‘Clock News” • “Not try to ‘sell’ a boring or ‘un-newsworthy’ story. It’s a turn-off. • “Just send out blanket press releases and expect to get decent results. Target your approach.” • “Send pictures and video DVDs with qualification.” • Contact instead with ideas.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

Creating Media Opportunities

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Creating Media Opportunities
Hard Stories
• • • • Terrorist outrage Factory fire R&D come up with a new invention General Election ……. All these are likely to get more press coverage than you could possible cope with

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Creating Media Opportunities
Soft News
• PR News e.g. new improved gizmo, that’s not so different from last year’s model can be hard to ‘sell’ in comparison • So How Do You ‘Sell’ Soft News i.e. PR News?

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Creating Media Opportunities
Discover the Difference
• What is it that makes you, your product or service different from others in the field • Your ‘story’ has got to make a difference

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Institute of Public Relations

Media Relations Techniques

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Media Relations Techniques
• • • • News releases Executive Interviews News/press conferences Photo calls, photo stories

But what works?

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Works?

- 2003 Press Survey

Press Survey • In one day, the average consumer journalist sees: – 26 junk emails – 22 emailed press releases – 20 other emails – 18 faxed releases – 14 mailed releases – 8 phone calls from PR consultants – 27 other phone calls
Source: Communicating with Journalists (2003 study)
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Works?

- 2003 Press Survey

• Which techniques are most effective, according to journalists (10=useful; 0= waste of time): • Media event (6.9) • Survey results (6.5) • Case studies (6.1) • Personality profile (5.8) • Feature ideas (5.3)
Source: Communicating with Journalists (2003 study)
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Works?

- 2003 Press Survey

• Which techniques are most effective, according to journalists (10=useful; 0= waste of time): • Doing lunch (4.9) • Free samples (4.7) • Celebrity party (4.5) • Foreign trip (4.3) • National day / week (3.9)
Source: Communicating with Journalists (2003 study)
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Works?

- 2003 Press Survey

• Which techniques are most effective, according to journalists (10=useful; 0= waste of time): • Sporting event (hospitality) (3.8) • PR stunts (3.6) • Glossy press pack (3.6) • Competitions (3.5) • Novelty mail-outs (3.5)
Source: Communicating with Journalists (2003 study)
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

How To Improve Your Media Targeting – News Releases

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Effective Targeting
How to improve your media targeting
• “Reporters are attracted to friction - two competing agendas; two people facing off over a contentious issue, two groups that are at odds with each other. • “Friction tends to lead to interest, and that's what reporters and editors want. • Ultimately, they want a story that will cause their readers, listeners, or viewers to sit up and pay attention. • “If the story isn't out of the ordinary -- if it's just every-day stuff -- it will not be read, heard or seen.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Effective Targeting
Stick to the simple formula -- the five W's
• “We are taught to use the formula of who, what, where, when, why and how from secondary school media studies. • That’s just as important today as it was when we first learned to write a story. • However, there is one significant difference when dealing with the media. • “There's a sixth W: Why should anyone care? • “This is, perhaps, the most important W -- as every editor will ask it before letting a story see the light of day.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

What Is News?
• “Good news rarely attracts readers and is overlooked, more often than not, by news editors. It's why nobody gives a stuff about shipping until a ferry sinks with the loss of a thousand people. Bad news is always attractive, if only for the ‘That could have been me!’ value.”
Richard Clayton, News Editor, Fairplay International Shipping Weekly

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Effective Targeting
Last but not least
• “Entertainment or celebrities often gain instant newsworthiness. • “Some 10 years ago, viewers were glued to their television sets as OJ Simpson led a squad of police cars down an L.A. highway in a white Ford Bronco. • “Just as many people are following the daily reports of the case against Michael Jackson.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Effective Targeting
How to improve your media targeting
• “Ultimately, it's all about the story and how you package it. • “An awareness of the components of what makes a story newsworthy helps in getting your key messages to the right audiences • “In short, make sure what you have to say is newsworthy and has relevance. • “The bottom line is, that we as PR executives have to make the stories we tell newsworthy.
Martin Deller in the UNISON Press Office

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Effective Targeting
How to improve your media targeting
• “The more that we strive to hit the right buttons with the media, the better the chances of success”. • “Make sure what you have to say is newsworthy and has relevance.” • “Acknowledge that people make news not products or services.” (Think about that one). • “Target your stories to the programme. Each news programme has a slightly different feel and flavour.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Effective Targeting
How to improve your media targeting
• “Remember we are making a positive effort to broadcast regional stories.” • “Cut the purple prose and tell it like it is.” • “Be truthful, honest and transparent with your information. Don't put a gloss on it.” • “Remember we (journalists) work to tight deadlines.” • “We always need lots and lots of notice.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Effective Targeting
How to improve your media targeting
• “Refrain from dictating when, how and where stories should appear - we do not live in a dictatorship in the United Kingdom” • “Take the time and trouble to get to know what we are about and how we operate - we’ll think better of you if you do. • Maintain relationships, maintain contact, be accessible.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Effective Targeting
How to improve your media targeting
• Make your news releases punchy, and pertinent. I only read the first sentence. If it doesn’t grab me in 10 seconds it goes into the bin.” • “Remember most of our news comes from other journalists. I always read the nationals – qualities/broadsheets and Red Tops (tabloids). • I get radio transcripts of morning programmes and especially BBC Radio 4 ‘Today’ programme.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Creating Media Opportunities
How to improve your working relationship with journalists:
• “Target releases - circulation/coverage area” • “Make sure your news has relevance” • “Tell the truth, be honest and transparent with your information” • “Ensure you have an out-of-hours telephone number”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Creating Media Opportunities
How to improve your working relationship with journalists:
• “Acknowledge that your employees DO want to see stories about their organisation in their local paper/radio station” • “See us and learn how the media operates”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

Executive Interviews

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Handling Face-To-Face Interview
Before The Interview
• Don’t agree to an interview unless you know what the journalist wants to discuss and you have something to say on the subject • Prepare yourself for the interview • Get the most important point across first and repeat it at the end • Aim to get across not more than three key points

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Handling Face-To-Face Interview
Before The Interview
• Remember a journalist has a job to do: - to get a news story or to get an angle for a feature that interests their audience • When the interview is first requested, ask what the reporter’s deadline is and try your best to respect it. If that is not possible you should say so

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Handling Face-To-Face Interview
Before The Interview
• Imagine the worst possible question, prepare your response before the interview begins • Assume the journalist is an expert in journalistic skills - so don’t try and tell them how they should do their job

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Handling Face-To-Face Interview
During The Interview
• Ask what the interviewer wants exactly, storyline or story angle, context of proposed story and/or article who else he or she is interviewing • Don’t’ say anything “off the record” • Don’t let words be put into your mouth • Don’t guess or speculate. You know what you know. (If you don’t know - say so, and say that you will find
out the information for them).
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Handling Face-To-Face Interview
During The Interview
• If unsure of a question - ask for clarification • Don’t answer the “nasty” question you’re expecting, but isn’t asked • Don’t lie • Don’t argue or attack the media - it distracts from your main message and you won’t win anyway • Say it simply. Use short sentences

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Handling Face-To-Face Interview
During The Interview
• Don’t use jargon • Support statements with anecdotes or third party evidence • Never give opinions on other organisations or people • Don’t get lulled into a false sense of security

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Handling Face-To-Face Interview
During The Interview
• No comment = Guilty. There are ways of responding which
• are in essence a ‘no comment’, but more acceptable to the press. If there are issues that you don’t want to, or can’t comment on: – List them before the interview takes place – Tell the journalist up front – Discuss with your colleagues how best these should be handled. (Do not fall into the trap of answering questions outside your experience and responsibility)

• You are the one with the knowledge, news or views

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Interview By Telephone
Key Points
• When a call comes in: – Always tell the journalist that you will phone them right back rather than jumping into the interview at once. – Ask who they are and whom they work for – This gives you the opportunity to (a) collect your thoughts (b) make sure the caller is genuine (c) be more in control of the call because you are initiating it, rather than the journalist.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Interview By Telephone
Key Points
• Write down key points you wish to make • Ask what the interviewer wants • Get an idea of: – The storyline or story angle – Context of proposed story and/or article – Who else he or she is interviewing • Focus your mind on the task • Stop any disturbances. (People wandering by your desk, switch
your mobile phone off etc)

• If you are in an open plan office consider going to a quiet room

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Interview By Telephone
Key Points
• Keep relevant information by the phone • Remember the phone is sensitive to mood swings • Be friendly and polite in tone, but be firm if necessary • Finish your call when you have made your points and don't want to make any more

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

News/Press Conferences & Editor Briefings

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Types of Media Event
Types of Media Event
• Press Conference – rather than issue a news release, tell your story to an invited group of journalists • News Event – organise something newsworthy as your angle, such as a launch of a new council initiative • Photo Opportunity – this will often merge with your ‘event’, e.g. celebrity cutting ribbon of a new store

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Types of Media Event
Types of Media Event
• Facility Trips – invite a group to visit round a new school • Reception/breakfast/lunch briefing – background briefing for journalists to meet a new director e.g. CEO

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Only hold a news conference if you can √ one or more of the following:
• It is big news and this is the only way for journalists to get the information • It is urgent • It is complex or especially interesting and the chance to ask questions or get on-the-spot quotes is important • Provides a cross-section of speakers who can provide different perspectives on an issue e.g. environment • There is a celebrity speaker or the chance of a good photograph
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Conferences & Briefings

News Conferences & Briefings
• “Find something visual and relevant to illustrate your story especially for TV - if moving pictures aren't available, colour stills or transparency or black and white picture are acceptable.” • “If key media can't do the press conference e.g. deadlines, ask if they would like to do an advance interview.” • “Allocate time before/after press confidence for interviews and Qs & As.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Conferences & Briefings
• “Provide facilities (especially for TV news) to take relevant pictures in advance, particularly on a big or compelling story.” • “Remember that sometimes we like to interview the person at the ‘sharp end’ - the soldier that has been in the front line rather than the commanding officer.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Conferences & Briefings
• “Pick the best speaker, not necessarily the highestranking one, and make sure that he/she talks economically.” • “Media train the speaker.” • “Key your key messages right – and rehearse, rehearse.” • Remember – on radio or TV you’re only going to get up to 45 seconds of chat at best.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Key Environmental Messages
Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics’ environmental policy is: 2. Reduce the impact of any shipping activities that affect the environment, 3. Work with customers to achieve common environmental goals, 4. Be the best operator in the shipping business in environmental matters.

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Conferences & Briefings
• “Be brief and to the point in an interview. A whole radio and/or TV bulletin is the same length as a column in the Financial Times.” • “Try and get away with a discreet company/organisation logo e.g. on lapel badge, hard hat for pictures or TV studio interviews.” • “Expect awkward questions and have your answers ready.”

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Conferences & Briefings
News Briefing Check List
• Chose time and place that will get the best response • Thoroughly check-out venue, especially for AV needs • Date - check date for conflict that your selected date doesn’t clash with another major launch (e.g. if organising
motor briefing check with Motor Industry Public Affairs Association & Guild of Motoring Writers)

• Send named invitations a few weeks ahead, follow-up a few days before. If possible, do a ‘ring round’ on the day or day before if event is 1st thing in the morning
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Conferences & Briefings
News Briefing Check List
• Keep the event short (i.e. not more than 60 mins) and well structured • Content - ask a couple of friendly journalists what would they like to hear on the day and tailor briefing to suit • Prepare key messages that you want to put across • Discuss the issues likely to surface at the event • Prepare question and Answer (Q&A) document

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Conferences & Briefings
News Briefing Check List
• Ensure you know what has appeared in that morning’s papers – so that you can deal with any issues that arise on the day • Allow time for: – Questions – One-to-one intervening with key executive(s) • Rehearse, rehearse and rehearse – to ensure that the presentation is well delivered • Press Kits – if the presentation is on PowerPoint ensure a hard copy is included in press kits

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

News Conferences & Briefings
News Briefing Check List
• Put press pack online (but pdf presentation so it cannot be cut and pasted and therefore taken out of context your presentation) • Ensure you have decent digital ‘head and shoulders’ images of key executives and company factory, office etc images for the media available • Be prepared for few turning up, and make contingency plans

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

The Press Briefing From Hell
It will never get as bad as this…..!
• You will never have a worse event that the march held in new York in 1971 by Italian-Americans. • It culminated in a rally in Columbus Circle to protest that they were being discriminated against because everyone thought that all Americans with Italian names were automatically members of the Mafia. • Their main speaker rose to talk and was then shot – by a Mafia gunman

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

Photo Calls & Photo Stories

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Photo Calls & Photo Stories
Setting Up A Photo Call
• Send short bullet point text to picture editor ion advance with who, why, what, when and how of event and timings • Give details of photo opportunity – e.g. opening new store with a celebrity • If you want product name or logo in shot think about where you need to place it • Ensure executives are in smart business attire or uniform

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Digital Photographs
Digital Photos
• Most used form of pictures by news desks • Get a professional photographer to take shots – those taken by an amateur are a turn-off • Prepare a detailed brief for the photographer • Send digital pictures separately from press release, but include a caption • Check the dpi of picture needed usually 72 dpi for web used, 300 dpi for print use • Send selection of low resolution pictures for journalist to pick from, then send hi res pic

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

How To Get “Closer” To Journalists

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

How To Get “Closer” To Journalists
• Listen, see and read as much of the media as you can (read particularly the Media Guardian supplement in
Monday’s The Guardian)

• Show them around your organisation and introduce them to some of the senior members of your organisation. • Bear in mind journalists are busy people • Ensure you have something of interest, each time you make contact (Offering them a good lunch is simply
not good enough)

• Be sure of your facts
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

How To Get “Closer” To Journalists
• Never, never tell a lie (because whatever your morals,
you’ll eventually be found out)

• Be transparent with you information • Once you have gained a reputation for providing: valuable, accurate and fast information • ....the media will approach you • Try and find out what special features are planned perhaps you can contribute

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

How To Get “Closer” To Journalists
• If you spot a story with which you disagree or can offer a follow-up - telephone the journalist and explain your reaction or what you have to offer (ensuring of course it puts you in a good light) • Monitor the media • Keep cuttings and broadcast transcripts for future reference

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

How To Get “Closer” To Journalists
• Do not ask to see copy - its unprofessional and they probably will not allow you to view anyway • Ensure company executives sing from the same hymn sheet • Photographs - use a professional news photographer (check with your paper’s picture desk editor
first as to who they would recommend)

• If you are not sure - seek your colleague's advice listen and act upon it!

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

How To Get “Closer” To Journalists
• Monitor the media • Keep cuttings and broadcast transcripts for future reference • But, just don’t use the ‘press clips’ as a reference for media monitoring and evaluation – Use the press clips as a spur for follow-up stories – Provide a new angle on an existing story

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Working With The Media
Chartered Institute of Public Relations

10 Things About Journalists

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

10 Things About Journalists
1. They are professional and objective - for their medium 2. It’s a market: you’re selling, they’re buying 3. Deadlines are real. So they are busy – and like to appear so even when they are not 4. They want a good story - not just a good lunch 5. Remember the pressure they face: publishers, editors, time, competition, opposition, suspicion, cynicism, cost-cutting accountants

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

10 Things About Journalists
6. Get to know their medium - read, watch, listen 7. Learn from them about their medium, current trends etc 8. It is just as important to know the journalist as it is the medium he or she writes for 9. Make it easy for them, phone numbers, full names, full facts, easy access etc 10. Treat them as normal people, because they are smile down the phone

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

One Final Thought
• “Unless you read at least one newspaper, regularly listen to radio news, watch television news, have an interest in politics and current affairs, are inquisitive in nature, and know what’s going on in this world, then you haven’t got a hope in hell of feeding a story to us.”
Craig Oliver, Editor, BBC ‘Ten 'O Clock News’

Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

Contact Point
Robert Minton-Taylor Associate Senior Lecturer Leighton Hall School Business & Law Leeds Metropolitan University Headingley Campus Beckett Park, Leeds LS6 3QS Website: http://www.leedsmet.ac.uk Tel: +44 (0) 113 283 2600 Ext 4808 E-mail: r.minton-taylor@leedsmet.ac.uk OR Tel: +44 (0) 1535 634 634 Fax: +44 (0) 1535 634 773 Mobile +44 (0) 7947 818 816 E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com
Tutor: Robert Minton-Taylor FCIPR E-mail: robert@minton-taylor.com Tel: 01535 634 634

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