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SERVING DEAF PATRONS IN THE LIBRARY: Part 1

presented by Kathy MacMillan, NIC, M.L.S.

QUESTION
In what kind of library do you work?
† Public

library † School Library (K-12) † College or university library † Special collections † Special needs library † Other

Overview: Part 1
† Terminology † What

you need to know about deafness † Looking at your library through deaf eyes † American Sign Language † Basic signs for the library † Developing your collection † Resources † Q&A

Overview: Part 2
† Review † Varieties

of sign language † Your library·s legal obligations in serving deaf patrons † Finding, hiring, and working with interpreters † Video Relay Service † Q&A

In what kind of library do you work?
† Public

library † School Library (K-12) † College or university library † Special collections † Special needs library † Other

QUESTION
Appropriate terms to refer to a person with a hearing loss include which of the following?
† deaf

mute † deaf or hard-of-hearing † hearing impaired † deaf and dumb

ANSWER
Appropriate terms to refer to a person with a hearing loss include:
† deaf

mute or hard-of-hearing impaired

† deaf

† hearing

† deaf

and dumb

QUESTION
What is the difference between ´deafµ and ´Deafµ?
a)

b)

c)

d)

Someone who is ´deafµ has a mild hearing loss, while someone who is ´Deafµ has a profound hearing loss. Someone who is ´deafµ has a hearing loss, while someone who is ´Deafµ is a member of a cultural group. Someone who is ´deafµ does not consider him/herself to be part of a cultural group, while someone who is ´Deafµ does. Someone who is ´deafµ would never use sign language, while someone who is ´Deafµ would always use sign language.

ANSWER
What is the difference between ´deafµ and ´Deafµ?
a)

b)

c)

d)

Someone who is ´deafµ has a mild hearing loss, while someone who is ´Deafµ has a profound hearing loss. Someone who is ´deafµ has a hearing loss, while someone who is ´Deafµ is a member of a cultural group. Someone who is ´deafµ does not consider him/herself to be part of a cultural group, while someone who is ´Deafµ does. Someone who is ´deafµ would never use sign language, while someone who is ´Deafµ would always use sign language.

American Deaf Culture:
The shared values, beliefs, and behaviors, based on shared experience, of the deaf community in the United States.

QUESTION
What percentage of deaf people have deaf parents?
† 10% † 25% † 75% † 90%

ANSWER
What percentage of deaf people have deaf parents?
† 10% † 25% † 75% † 90%

Central Values of American Deaf Culture
Access to communication Deafness does not need to be ´fixedµ Community American Sign Language Deaf Culture traditions, art, and storytelling Clarity of communication

EARth and EYEth
EARth ears hearing impaired listen with ears Technology of sound Attention getting EYEth eyes Deaf listen with eyes Technology of sight Attention getting

QUESTION
You see two people standing in a narrow hallway signing to one another. You need to get to the other end of the hallway. There is only a little bit of space behind them to squeeze by. What is the most polite thing to do?
a)

b)

c)

d)

Get their attention, say or sign ´Excuse meµ, and walk between them. Crouch down and creep through them, so you don·t block their conversation. Do your best to squeeze behind one of them so you don·t have to walk through their conversation. Walk quickly between them, saying or signing ´excuse meµ.

ANSWER
You see two people standing in a narrow hallway signing to one another. You need to get to the other end of the hallway. There is only a little bit of space behind them to squeeze by. What is the most polite thing to do?
a)

b)

c)

d)

Get their attention, say or sign ´Excuse meµ, and walk between them. Crouch down and creep through them, so you don·t block their conversation. Do your best to squeeze behind one of them so you don·t have to walk through their conversation. Walk quickly between them, saying or signing ´excuse meµ.

Manners Signs

http://youtu.be/jzy07Pcsl7Q

The Library Through Deaf Eyes
Consider the visual layout Is signage direct and easy to understand?
† Is

it in logical places? † Remember that English is a second language for many deaf people. † Can you add picture cues to make it clearer and more appealing? † Is there ´signage overloadµ?

Tips for Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Customers
Keep your face and lips visible. Choose a location that is well-lit and away from background noise. Avoid standing with your back to any light source. Look directly at the person with whom you are talking. To get the person·s attention, tap his or her shoulder or arm, or wave your hand.

Tips for Communicating with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Customers
Make sure the person is looking at you before you speak, sign, or gesture. Speak naturally³don·t shout, exaggerate, or speak very slowly Use natural facial expressions and gestures and any signs you may know Use pencil and paper to communicate if necessary, but be aware that English may be the deaf person·s second language Use simple language and avoid unnecessary words

QUESTION

True or False?: Sign language is universal.

FALSE!

American Sign Language is:
The sign language of the deaf community in the United States and most of Canada A real language with its own grammar and syntax NOT related to English

Did you know? 80% of American Sign Language is conveyed through the face and body, NOT the hands.

American Sign Language developed from:
French Sign Language Martha·s Vineyard Sign Language Home signs

Library Signs 1
http://youtu.be/-ObsgmOPvsE

Library Signs 2
http://youtu.be/wbMKb9E5adk

Library Signs 3
http://youtu.be/292569IOZrk

Library Signs Quiz
After practicing your library signs with the previous videos, quiz yourself here: Library Signs Quiz: http://youtu.be/a4UA8QBP6_o Answer Sheet can be found at: www.kathymacmillan.com/librarysigns.html

The Manual Alphabet
A way of representing English words Not a substitute for signs, but valuable to know Fingerspelling charts, practice, and fonts: http://asl.ms/

Collection Development Considerations for Sign Language Materials
What is the visual quality? What are the credentials of the authors or producers? Does the book or video place the language in an appropriate context for its audience? Is the information current? Does the material acknowledge the wide variety among deaf people and users of sign language? Does the book or video state clearly whether it is depicting ASL or Signed English? Is the content appropriate to the audience? For DVDs: Is the program accessible? What is the technical quality?

Resources to Know
†

Online ASL dictionaries:  www.aslpro.com  www.signingsavvy.com The Red Notebook: Deaf Resources @ Your Library: www.folda.net Try Your Hand at This!: Easy Ways to Incorporate Sign Language Into Your Programs by Kathy MacMillan. (Scarecrow Press, 2006) "Hands-On Collection Building: A librarian offers tips for sign language materials selection" by Kathy MacMillan. School Library Journal, March 2003. http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA386730.html For Hearing People Only: answers to some of the most commonly asked questions about the Deaf community, its culture, and the "Deaf reality" by Matthew S. Moore and Linda Levitan ; with a foreword by Harlan Lane. (Deaf Life Press, 1993) Through Deaf Eyes (DVD). (PBS Home Video, 2007) Audism Unveiled (DVD). (DawnSignPress, 2008)

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Questions?

Thank you!
See www.kathymacmillan.com for resources, tips, and to sign up for my e-newsletter!