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Introduction to e-Business Systems


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Learning Objectives

 Giveexamples of how Internet and


other information technologies support
business processes within various
business functions

 Identify
cross-functional applications,
and how they can provide significant
business value to a company
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Section I

Functional Business Systems


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IT in Business

 “Business managers
are moving from a
tradition where they
could avoid, delegate,
or ignore decisions
about IT to one where
they cannot create a
marketing, product,
international,
organization, or
financial plan that does
not involve such
decisions.”
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Marketing Systems
 MarketingInformation Systems provide
information technologies that support major
components of the marketing function.
 Interactive Marketing
 Customer focused marketing process
 Based on using Internet, intranets, & extranets to establish two-
way communications between customers or potential
customers and the business
 Customers become involved in product development, delivery,
& service issues
 Ie MS Beta Testing, focus groups
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Marketing Systems (continued)


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Marketing Systems (SFA)

Sales Force
Automation
 The sales force is
connected to marketing
websites on the Internet,
extranets, & the
company intranet
 Increases productivity of
sales force
 Speeds up the capture &
analysis of sales data
 Allows management to
provide improved
delivery information &
better support of the
sales force.
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Manufacturing Systems

 Support the production/operations


function

 Assists firms in planning, monitoring, &


controlling inventories, purchases, & the
flow of goods and services
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Manufacturing Systems (continued)

 Computer-
Integrated
Manufacturing
(CIM)

 Supports the
concepts of flexible
manufacturing
systems, agile
manufacturing, &
total quality
management
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Human Resource Systems

 Human Resource Information Systems


 Support

 Planning to meet the personnel needs of the


business
 Development of employees to their full potential

 Recruitment, selection, & hiring

 Job placement
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Human Resource Systems (continued)


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Human Resource Systems (continued)

 HRM and the Internet


 Allows companies to process most common HRM
applications over their intranets.
 Allows companies to provide around-the-clock
services to their employees.
 Allows companies to disseminate valuable
information faster.
 Allows employees to perform HRM tasks online.
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Accounting Systems

 Record and
report business
transactions
and other
economic
events

 Online
Accounting
Systems
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Accounting Systems (continued)

 Six widely used accounting systems


 Order processing
 Captures & processes customer orders and produces
data needed for sales analysis and inventory control
 Inventory Control
 Processes data reflecting changes in items in
inventory.
 Helps provide high-quality service while minimizing
investment in inventory & inventory carrying costs
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Accounting Systems (continued)

 Accounts Receivable
 Keeps records of amounts owed by
customers from data generated by customer
purchases and payments

 Accounts Payable
 Keeps track of data concerning purchases
from, and payments to, suppliers
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Accounting Systems (continued)

 Payroll
 Receives and maintains data from employee
time cards and other work records

 General Ledger
 Consolidates data received from accounts
receivable, accounts payable, payroll, & other
accounting information systems
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Financial Management Systems

 Supportsfinancial managers in
decisions concerning
 The financing of the business
 The allocation & control of financial

resources within the business.


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Financial Management Systems


(areas)
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Financial Management Systems


(Hyperion)
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Financial Management System


(Scenario)
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Section II

Cross-Functional Enterprise
Systems
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Cross-Functional Enterprise Applications

 Integrated combinations of information


subsystems that share information
resources and support business
processes across the functional units
 A strategic way to use IT to share
information resources & improve
efficiency & effectiveness
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Cross-Functional Enterprise
Applications (continued)

 Enterprise Application Architecture


 Focused on accomplishing fundamental
business processes in concert with the
company’s customer, supplier, partner, &
employee stakeholders
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Cross-Functional Enterprise
Applications (continued)
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Enterprise Application Integration


(EAI)

 Software enables users to model the


business processes involved in the
interactions that should occur between
business applications.
 Also provides middleware that
 Performs data conversion & coordination
 Provides application communication &
messaging services
 Provides access to the application interfaces
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Enterprise Application Integration


(continued)

 Business value
 Integrates front-office and back-office
applications to allow for quicker, more effective
response to business events and customer
demands
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Transaction Processing Systems


 Cross-functional
information systems
that process data
resulting from the
occurrence of
business transactions
 Transactions – events
that occur as part of
doing business
 Sales
 Purchases
 Deposits
 Withdrawals
 Refunds
 Payments
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Enterprise Collaboration Systems

 Cross-functionale-business systems
that enhance communication,
coordination, & collaboration
 Communicate – share information with each
other
 Coordinate – coordinate individual work efforts &
use of resources with each other.
 Collaborate – work together cooperatively on
joint projects and assignments
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Enterprise Collaboration Systems


(continued)

 Tools for Enterprise Collaboration


 Electronic communication
 E-mail
 Voice mail
 Fax
 Web publishing
 Bulletin boards
 Paging
 Internet phone systems
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Enterprise Collaboration Systems


(continued)

 Electronic conferencing
 Data & voice conferencing
 Videoconferencing
 Chat systems
 Discussion forums
 Electronic meeting systems
 Synchronous. Team members can meet at the
same time and place in a “decision room” setting
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Enterprise Collaboration Systems


(continued)

 Collaborative work management


 Calendaring & scheduling
 Task & project management
 Workflow systems
 Knowledge management
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i.e. Workspaces
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Real World Case 1 – Cypress


Semiconductor & FleetBoston

 Use of Internet technologies to support


the marketing function at Cypress
Semiconductor to improve business
and customer value
 CRM systems
 Benefits and potential challenges of
FleetBoston’s use of IT to support their
targeted marketing programs
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Real World Case 2 – Johnson Controls

 Manufacturing auto components


 Cut engineering design time through collaboration
 Covisint
 MatrixOne

 How do Web-based systems support the exchange of


‘tribal’ knowledge through collaboration?

 Can collaboration systems improve the quality of the


products that are designed, as well as reducing the
cost and time of the design process?
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Real World Case 3 – Union Pacific,


Corporate Express, & Best Buy

 How could enterprise application systems


improve a company’s business interactions
with its suppliers?
 EAI – WebMethods
 From EDI to XLM data mapping

 What major challenges are faced by


businesses that implement EAI initiatives?
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Real World Case 4 – Baxter International

 Whatkey HR applications are provided


by Baxter’s Web-based HR system?
 PeopleSoft HR
 Change in business processes

 What are some other Web-based HR


applications they might implement?
 Interest in bringing outsourcing back in house
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Real World Case 5 – IBM Corporation

 Whyhave many companies been reluctant to


support instant messaging in the workplace?
 Lotus Samplace

 What are the advantages of instant


messaging over e-mail and voice mail for
enterprise collaboration?
 Potentially avoid that email and voicemail requests are
ignored