JOUR1111 Personal Media Use and Production

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Eleni Zambas (s4258104)

3/29/12

Personal Media Use and Production Over a Period of Ten Days:
Form of Media Day One Day Two Day Three Day Four Day Five Day Six Day Seven Day Eight Day Nine Day Ten

Facebook   Twitter   Tumblr   News Online Novel Reading University Reading Radio   Film   Television   Magazines   Newspapers   Blogger  

120 20 120 30 60 0 0 0 300 0 0

140 10 180 20 25 30 20 0 240 20 25

30 10 10 30 0 0 120 0 120 0 0

60 0 60 10 0 120 0 120 180 0 0

60 10 180 30 180 30 10 0 240 40 60

45 10 60 20 60 60 0 40 180 20 30

30 30 60 60 0 210 0 0 120 0 0

0 0 0 20 0 120 0 0 60 0 0

20 20 60 45 0 180 60 0 60 0 0

60 5 60 10 0 180 0 0 120 0 0

30

10

0

30

0

0

60

0

0

20

Total:3/29/12 5335 minutes of media use over a ten day period.

(↑ Minutes spent per day on each media form)

After logging my media use over a period of ten days, it became evident that my most frequently used form of media is television, recording an approximate total of 1620 minutes (27 hours) in the ten days. However, I also spend adequate amount of time producing my own media through my two blogs, one being through tumblr.com and the other blogger.com. The forms of media I use the least of appear to be magazines, newspapers and films. However, when addressing these factors a couple of things must be taken into consideration. First of all, although my reading of newspapers and magazines is fairly low (especially for someone who aspires to have a career in the field), my online news reading is reasonable, which goes to show the evolution of media in the 21st Century. Secondly, my current lifestyle, priorities and responsibilities need to be taken into consideration. Hence, I have not spent as much time reading books, watching movies and catching up with the latest celebrity gossip in magazines as I would have, had I had been on holidays. Therefore it must be noted that this is not concrete evidence of my daily media routine, which is subject to constant change.

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In order to completely appreciate the above data, other contributing factors also need to be addressed. Firstly, the place where the majority of this data was collected was in the confines of my own home. Secondly, it should be noted that majority of my novel, news online and university reading and tweeting occurred either in the morning, or throughout the day. On the other hand, watching television, blogging and facebook-ing occurred at night. These two factors hold relevance in that depending on how much time I spend at home and at what time I am home, these statistics could easily change. So, I guess the ultimate question is why? Why is my data so? Well, simply put, this data is a reflection of my interests, my lifestyle, my responsibilities and the influence of contemporary society. Due to today’s society, the general public is constantly being exposed to the media and this ongoing access obviously determines our usage. This also has dramatic effect on todays journalism world and apparent evolution of the media. Also, as I made note of earlier, it is absolutely crucial that this data not be seen as absolute. Things such as university, work, friends and family all effect my media usage and so all of this is nothing more than an insight into one particular time span in my life.

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Now, enough about me! What has every other JOUR1111 student been up to?
How Much Time Do You Spend On The Internet Each Day?

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What Do You Spend Most Of Your Online Time Doing?

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How Much TV Do You Watch Most Days

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Where Do You Listen To The Radio

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How Much Daily Radio Do You Listen To?

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Where Do You Get Your News

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So where does that leave me in relation to everybody else? Well, let’s start munching on these pies and figure it out…
According to Pie No. 1, the average JOUR1111 student spends 2-3 hours on the internet per day. On the other hand, I tend to spend a few more hours surfing the net albeit on Facebook or twitter or blogging or reading the news. So for this one, I fall out of the mean. According to Pie No.2 (so many flavours in this one!), the average JOUR1111 student spends their time on the internet on Facebook. Facebook also takes up the majority of my time on the internet, along with tumblr. According to Pie No.3, the average JOUR1111 student spends 1-2 hours per day watching television. In contrast, on average I could watch anywhere between 2-4 hours of television per day. According to Pie No.4, the average JOUR1111 student listens to the radio when they are in the car. Similarly, I also most commonly listen to the radio when I am in the car. According to Pie No.5, the average JOUR1111 student listens to less than an hour of radio per day. I too listen to less than an hour of radio per day. According to Pie No.6, the average JOUR1111 student gets their news from the television. I also am notified of most breaking news through television. Why is this so…? Many factors contribute to these statistics. Firstly, due to my current unemployment, I arguable have more free time on my hands which can be used to explain my higher television viewing hours and time spent on the internet. The fact that we are university students where the majority of us catch public transport, as it is arguably more convenient than driving, also contributes to the radio statistics presented. Furthermore, the high use of Facebook by the majority of JOUR1111 students, including myself, effectively exhibits the prominence of social networking in contemporary society. Finally, the fact that the majority of us find out the news through television displays the advancements of modern media.

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Now, what does all this mean? What lies behind these behaviours? Is this data just a small part of a greater issue? And most importantly, what does this mean for Journalism and Communication’s role in modern society?
There is no constant in the media world. Technology is the most relentless facet of the 21st Century, forever advancing and creeping its way into businesses, institutions, homes and more. Consequently, the youth of today is being exposed to more media than previous generations. Having constant access, albeit through television, the internet or good old fashioned newspapers, modern society has a powerful relationship with the media, including journalism and communication. Thus, the statistics compiled through both the survey and my own personal media diary, are a small indication of the media’s influence in the general public’s lives today. Things such as social networking (Facebook, Twitter, Blogs, Skype) play prominent roles in society and it can be argued that future generations will not be able to have proper conversations that are not behind a keyboard. The fact that Smart phones now swarm society also contribute to these statistics in that people now have a never-ending access (God forbid, your battery dies!) However, on a positive side, youths are also being exposed to world news through these social networking sites without even knowing. For instance, majority of the public were notified of the recent KONY2012 documentary through these social networks. Furthermore, the use of the internet in order to stream television programs, read online news and novels, shop, bank and many more things, proves not only the growing accessibility of all these things, but the decreasing interest in how these mediums were first retrieved. Due to their availability online, newspaper sales, television ratings and retail income have all presumably decreased in recent years. And this is where the issue lies. The future of journalism and communications is left up in the air due to the threatening prospects of the media. But at Steve Burnett once said… 3/29/12

“Regardless of the changes in technology, the market for well-crafted messages will always have an audience.”
So, just keep writing and creating and love what you do and it’ll continue to love you back…
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