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Building brands getting tougher Many more brands, tougher competition Much more clutter, many more ads Fight for consumers’ time, attention, memory Rising ad avoidance Need better understanding & application of influencers of brand choice
How can marketers make their brands stand out, be noticed and be remembered?

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Make ads more likeable  Creativity Ensure they are seen more  Media

Ensure they are seen in more places  Degree Branding
Or do something else that can help the brand be noticed and remembered better?

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 Black & white to colour photos   From still to moving pictures From silent movies to ‘talkies’ C PipalMajik .

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Sight  Sound  Smell  Taste  Touch  How many sensory organs does your favourite brand stimulate? C PipalMajik .

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2003: Martin Lindstrom -> Millward Brown “Help me prove that the sensory experience of brands plays a key role in creating brand loyalty”  2-stage research designed    Global Research Project  600 researchers  Thousands of respondents C PipalMajik .

understood & more distinct Stage 2 – Quanti Online Research. 18 brands. 2000 consumers Correlated Sensory Strength of brands with consumers’ Intention to Purchase    C PipalMajik . 10 global & 3 local brands Confirmed that brands with ‘Sensory Depth & Synergy’ were strong brands – better remembered.  Understanding the role of the Senses in building brands Stage 1 – Quali Research. 13 countries. 2 countries.

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brands can establish a stronger and longer-lasting emotional connection with consumers. C PipalMajik .Sensory Marketing is based on the idea that we are most likely to form. retain and revisit memory when multiple senses are engaged. By going beyond the traditional marketing media of sight and (sometimes) sound.

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 Experiential Objectives:       Create or evoke memories Alter moods Create sensations Establish associations Establish emotional bonds Enhance the product(or service) experience Create buzz and interest in sharing experiences with others  Marketing Objectives:    Encourage trial Promote switching Increase product usage Create meaningful and lasting differentiation C PipalMajik .

 Source: Millward Brown Study  Note: Varies from category to category C PipalMajik .

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less effectiveness Most brands focus on this sense alone C PipalMajik .           The most powerful & seductive sense Creates the strongest immediate impact Can overrule other senses. needs focus We see what we want to see (‘Eye of the beholder’) The Rorschach Inkblot test Overstimulated & cluttered. override logic 83% of info people retain received visually Dr HA Roth (1988) – Food & Colour test C N DuBose – switching tastes & colours (60-70% error) Not always an accurate sense.

      Colour (combination) Shape (s) Typography Logo Icon/Symbol Look/Appearance… Can a brand uniquely own/be associated with one or more of these? C PipalMajik .

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         C PipalMajik Coca Cola McDonald’s Disney Vodafone Benetton Diesel Tommy Hilfiger Ferrari Body Shop .

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the jangle of a slot machine. Your brand may be associated with a sound experience.The soft clack of your computer keyboard. sound influences our ideas and judgments about the goods and services we buy. the muffled heft of your car door closing— these are all product elements companies have spent considerable time and money optimizing. From our ambient surroundings to a product-produced noise. the crunch of your morning cereal. C PipalMajik .

       Sound – powerful influence on how we think & feel Affects both hearing (passive. through brain – filter. used occasionally for usage feedback loop (digital camera) C PipalMajik . through ears. state of mind instantly (horror movies) Relatively underrated and underutilized in product design & brand communication till now (phone design) Influences product quality perception (car door) Industrial design driven mainly by 3 factors -functionalism. visual aesthetics and user convenience Sound design largely functional till recently. respond) Affects mood. subconscious effect) and listening (active. focus. remember.

can change mood  Can create atmosphere & intangible associations  Sound hardwired into our emotional circuitry  Disproportionate impact on purchase of certain categories  Only 4% of Fortune 500 companies use Sonic Branding  C PipalMajik .Extremely effective branding device  Can reflect character/personality well subliminally  Sonic branding / Sonic logo (1 to 3 second equivalent of visual trademark)  Evokes feelings.

spending & traffic flow in stores & restaurants Fast music decreases spending in a retail environment. mood affects purchase intent Classical Music reduced crime in Australian village. but increases turnover in restaurants (29% higher restaurant bills with slower music) Judy & Mark Alpert Study – music affects mood.     Ronal Millman research – pace of music affects service. train station in Denmark & Bus Terminal in NY Falling revenues in soundless slot machines C PipalMajik .

Bellagio Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas replaced its slot machines with new cashless models. minus the satisfactory clank of falling coins. C PipalMajik . Revenue dropped dramatically and the original machines were quickly put back in service.

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Mercedes-Benz has created a 10-engineer department whose sole task is to create the ideal sound for the opening and closing of a car door. C PipalMajik .

Victoria’s Secret uses specially chosen classical music in its stores to support its premium image and enhance the buying experience C PipalMajik .

psychologists.      Collaboration between brand experts. musicians & market researchers Priority to ‘human’ & element over functional element in acoustic design Every sound researched & refined to provide ‘maximum acoustic comfort’ Each car has its own individual human & friendly ‘character’ or ‘voice’ through sound design Each sound connected to relevant emotion Every sound simulated in recording studio by acoustician-musician & given to engineers to replicate  ‘Hum’ of engine  ‘Swish’ of windscreen wipers C PipalMajik .

        Intel Nokia Microsoft Daimler Chrysler Renault Kellog’s Disney World Bang & Olufsen C PipalMajik .

       Victoria’s Secret Abercrombie & Fitch Gap Eddie Bauer Toy’R’Us Starbucks JC Penny (customised by demographics) C PipalMajik .

           C PipalMajik Britannia Nirma Lifebouy Liril Titan Boroline Rasna Airtel Reliance Mobile Tata Docomo Kingfisher… .

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Most brands don’t have an answer!

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The human nose can identify & recall up to 10,000 scents  Smell is 1000 times more sensitive than taste  Most primal & direct sense, immediate impact  Up to 75 % of our emotions are generated by what we smell  Olfactory cues hardwired into brain’s limbic system  Direct connection with emotions & memories  ‘Memory markers’ -can stimulate vivid recollections  Even visual cues can cause resurrection and ‘experience’  Can impact information processing (smell of coffee or lemon can make us alert)  ‘Proust Effect’ – relationship between sensory stimulation & memory (French novelist Marcel Proust)

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lust. we feel” C PipalMajik . Russell Brumfield.” Moreover. these smells instantly trigger messages in the limbic system. “The result is immediate: When we smell.Out of all the senses. As Dr. “Every other sensory system must send a signal to the thalamus and ask permission to connect to the rest of the brain … Smell signals bypass the thalamus. As C. John Medina explains in his bestseller Brain Rules. perception and imagination. author of Whiff! writes. smell is the only one with a direct link to the brain. the part of the brain that contains keys to emotion.

C PipalMajik . who relied on their sense to smell to detect danger. and provides both sensual pleasure (the odor of flowers and perfume) as well as warnings of danger (spoiled food. chemical dangers). mates and predators.Smell (or olfaction) allows vertebrates and other organisms with olfactory receptors to identify food. For both humans and animals. we are less in touch with our sense of smell than our primitive forefathers. it is one of the important means by which the environment communicates with us. Today.

    By 4-6 weeks. 1999):      Opposite sex: 76% very important Spouse: 74% very important Family: 35% very important Friends: 36% very important Co-workers: 39% very important C PipalMajik . emotiontriggering memories evoked by smell Importance of smell in daily relationships (Olfactory Research Fund. infants can discriminate between their mother’s scent and a stranger Almost everyone has experienced a situation in which a smell evoked a nostalgic memory 80% men and 90% women reported having vivid.

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one in a room with a floral scent and one with no scent. C PipalMajik .Lindstrom describes an experiment in which two pairs of identical Nike shoes were evaluated by consumers. 84% of the subjects evaluated the sneakers in the scented room as superior.

don’t overdo (what are they hiding?). flowers. Need for strategic fit  Consistency  Uniqueness  Appropriateness    Consider & leverage existing elements (coffee. use ‘real’ and not ‘artificial’ scents Can you create an unique association and synergy with brand image and other senses? C PipalMajik . new books. fresh bakes. chocolates) Be subtle. linen.

casinos and resorts are incorporating environmental scent-branding for their properties. they will immediately think of the hotel or property they remember and want to return.Environmental scenting is a big trend. spas. and hotels. Luxury car dealerships such as Lexus are also using environmental scenting to ‘brand’ their properties and offer clients a positive experience they will associate with their brand. C PipalMajik . When guests have a delightful experience and later smell that blend.

Intimate Blue. Sony. has clients like Hallmark. Hilton and Saks Fifth Avenue C PipalMajik ..C. suntan lotion near the bathing suits. D.     Samsung Electronics introduced the fragrance. an ambient scent provider. to its flagship store in New York City The Park Hyatt Washington. pumps a scent into the lobby using atomizers The new official fragrance of Omni Hotels is a blend of lemongrass and green tea Bloomingdale’s uses different essences in different departments: baby powder in the baby section. lilacs in lingerie. and cinnamon & pine scents during the holidays Scentair.

The London-based shirt brand scents its stores with a continuous spray of a proprietary ‘line-dried linen’ perfume C PipalMajik .

At Starbucks. employees are forbidden to wear perfume because it would interfere with the natural coffee aroma. C PipalMajik .

This is a fairly amazing reason to drop what was supposed to have been a major growth product line. Why? Because the smell of heating egg and cheese sandwiches interferes with the coffee aroma. and shows that some companies really DO understand sensory marketing and branding. Now. Starbucks has announced that they will quit serving breakfast. (Jan 31.Starbucks understands Sensory Branding. 2008) C PipalMajik . and in particular Olfactory Marketing. The wonderful aroma of a good coffee shop is a great selling and branding tool – this is particularly important since research shows that the majority of the experience of drinking espresso comes from the coffee shop experience itself.

Starbucks earlier dumped its egg breakfast sandwiches because the egg smell conflicted with the expected and desirable coffee smell. and. Presumably. but Starbucks management apparently feels that any productivity loss at the stores will be offset by improved customer loyalty and higher sales.Starbucks has been under pressure to increase store revenue and profits. once again. it’s cheaper to ship the coffee pre-ground in sealed packages. The most startling change is that the firm will go back to grinding coffee in its stores for the sole purpose of improving the coffee aroma. 2008) C PipalMajik . they are turning to sensory branding for the solution. (March 21.

C PipalMajik .Rolls-Royce has worked to reconstruct the scent of its classic 1965 Silver Cloud. and is now sprayed under the seats of new automobiles. involving scents of 800 different materials.

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3M)  ‘Got Milk’ bus shelters in SF California gas stations – Coffee aroma  Motorola Smell-o-phone  McDonalds ‘stale oil’ smell association  Narrowcasting & preserving issues  Real vs. Aroma-added ads  Scratch-n-Sniff ads (Microencapsulation. artificial  Subjective personal preferences  Scenterprises – Custom-made personal formula  C PipalMajik .

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One reason for Singapore Airline’s sensory branding success is that they developed a unique scent (Stefan Floridian Waters), and then used it consistently for many years. Regular flyers learned what the airline smelled like; more importantly, they unconsciously associated this scent with the rest of the Singapore Airlines experience – lovely attendants, impeccable service, and so on.
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Primary info source – 10,000 taste buds Taste & Smell strongly linked Together, called the ‘chemical senses’ Unlike smell, needs physical contact Impacts mood, hence meetings ‘over coffee or lunch’ In an evolving society, search for newer and better tastes is growing & accelerating If a brand can add taste to its arsenal, it can create a much stronger & memorable brand experience

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    Obviously important for food brands A lot of businesses & brands are adding taste to make brand experience richer (book stores. Shops. Malls. etc.) Potential conflict between health consciousness & taste evolution Need to judiciously play up benefits C PipalMajik . Cinema Halls.

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       Skin is the largest organ in the body Alerts us to a sense of well being or pain Connected to texture of products and experiences We have more tactile receptors in our little fingers alone than we do on our entire back When we encounter a pleasant touch. the comfort of a leather sofa. the smooth texture of silk – all these can help create a superior sensory branded experience C PipalMajik . the brain releases a hormone called oxytocin. touch and test things is huge. the cushioning of a carpet. and retailers count on that in their display strategies The pleasure of an air-conditioned environment. leading to feelings of wellbeing and calm The urge to pick up.

The ability to touch a product increases our confidence in the item’s quality Even if packaging prevents a product from being accessible retailers should find a way to make it accessible to consumers C PipalMajik . weight and form. temperature. surface.    Researchers have found that shoppers who touch a product are more likely to purchase. even as it relates to impulse buys Our touch experience includes material.

Britain’s ASDA grocery chain took the wrappers off several brands of toilet paper. The result was 50 percent increase in sales. C PipalMajik . inviting consumers to feel for themselves.

loft and fabric. C PipalMajik .Bed Bath and Beyond allows you to touch samples of each item. feeling the heft.

Big Bazaar allows consumers to touch & feel them before weighing & buying them as per their old habits C PipalMajik .For a lot of items in vegetables. fruits & groceries.

Now that is touching the senses! C PipalMajik . Coca Cola became a runway hit partly due to the unique shape of the bottle which made it a favorite with the consumers.When it was launched. Even a blindfold person could recognize the brand without tasting the drink by just feeling the contours of the bottle.

The unique shape & feel of Pringles Chips and its packaging makes it a distinct brand C PipalMajik .

C PipalMajik . When a Coors bottle hits the optimum degree of coldness. mountains on the label turn from white to blue.Coors is the rare company to capitalize on temperature marketing with its innovative temperature indicator.

Bang & Olufsen focus groups have shown that customers equate some measure of heft with quality. While technology has evolved to enable ultra-light electronics.C PipalMajik Bang & Olufsen’s universal remote has been described as “heavy. aligned by a tungsten weight inside. solid and quite distinct” and marketing materials highlight the product’s heft and balance. .

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Replacing repetition with synergy Imagine movie minus soundtrack.The Multiplier Effect The Neuroscientific basis – creating larger & deeper Mental Maps  More Memory Markers  Brands that appeal to multiple senses are more likely to succeed than those which focus on 1 or 2       C PipalMajik . TV without sound 2+2=5 2+2+2+2+2 = 20? Polysensory Marketing .

     Does food taste better if it smells good. looks good? Does the look of a perfume bottle impact its image? Why do we smell wine before tasting it? Do sports cars look that way only for aerodynamics? Why do we feel clothes before buying them? C PipalMajik .

consumers  A town in Manchester cut the crime rate by playing classical music outside a convenience store  C PipalMajik .The car industry purposefully builds brands to appeal to the 4 major senses  Kellogg’s designs the sound of their cereals in a lab  Singapore Airlines matches the aroma in the cabin with the interior colour scheme and the uniforms worn by flight attendants  The Intel “bong” is recognized (unaided) by 56% of U.S.

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      Colour Shape Picture Name Language Icon       Sound Behaviour Service Tradition Ritual Navigation C PipalMajik .

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    Who owns red? Who owns blue? Who owns green? Who owns yellow? C PipalMajik .

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1915 – Earl R Dean of Root Glass Co. the pieces would still be recognizable as part of the whole’  Inspiration from pod of the cocoa bean  A bottle with ridged contours  C PipalMajik . Indiana – briefed to design a glass bottle  ‘Should be recognized in the dark’  ‘So distinctive that if it were broken.

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Magic Dreams Smiles Fantasy
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Harley-Davidson has tried to patent its raucous roar.
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Victoria’s Secret plays classical music to evoke a sense of upscale exclusivity for its brand

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Abercrombie and Fitch uses loud upbeat music with a heavy bass and eliminates gaps between tracks. creating a youthful nightclub-like atmosphere in its teen-focused clothing shops C PipalMajik .

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By introducing a distinctive sound to its breakfast cereal. the company integrated four senses into its product: taste.the crunch of the Kellogg’s cornflake was carefully developed in a Danish sound lab and patented. C PipalMajik .” .When sound is directly linked to the product itself. Kellogg’s takes full advantage of the sound element. pop. Its Rice Krispies have the classic “snap. crackle. consumers may interpret it as a sign of quality or familiarity. sight and sound. touch.

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      Colour Shape Picture Name Language Icon       Sound Behaviour Service Tradition Ritual Navigation C PipalMajik .

The way people use their senses varies from market to market both in terms of the sensory priority and in sensory sensitivity  Japan. India and Thailand have a “well-known history of integrating five senses in their culture and traditions”  Scandinavia has a “rich design heritage”  C PipalMajik .

fabric. to create a unique Multi-Sensory Brand Experience C PipalMajik . language and look around its female flight attendants. design. has aligned a special perfume. known as the Singapore Girls.Singapore Airlines.

1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) C PipalMajik Singapore Airlines Apple Disney Mercedes Benz Marlboro Tiffany Louis Vuitton Bang & Olufsen Nokia Harley Davidson 11) Nike 12) Absolut Vodka 13) Coca Cola 14) Gilette 15) Pepsi 16) Starbucks 17) Prada 18) Caterpillar 19) Guinness 20) Rolls Royce Source: Brand Sense. Martin Lindstrom .

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Inventory of all Sensory Impressions for a Brand How strongly the sense associated with the brand Whether the association is positive or negative How distinctive the association is What specific memories or emotions are related to the association  The relative importance of the sensory elements to Brand Loyalty      C PipalMajik .

Sight Sound Smell Taste Touch C PipalMajik .

An 8-Step Checklist for Sensory Marketing Excellence C PipalMajik .

Are you leveraging enough the existing touch points that the brand has with its consumers? C PipalMajik .

Does the brand have multiple smash-able brand elements or recognizable identity components? C PipalMajik .

Are the sensory stimuli being seen by the brand’s consumers as 3R – Real. Relevant & part of their own Rituals? C PipalMajik .

Is there consistency and repetition over time in the use of sensory stimuli by the brand? C PipalMajik .

owned and own-able by the brand in consumers’ minds? C PipalMajik .Are the sensory cues uniquely associated.

Is it possible to constantly build on the sensory cues to further strengthen brand imagery and connections? C PipalMajik .

Are the various stimuli. touch points and senses being leveraged by the brand in synergy with each other? C PipalMajik .

Are sensory stimuli being used innovatively than competitors? more C PipalMajik .

        Smash-ability Creativity Authenticity Leverage Longevity Ownership Progress Synergy C PipalMajik .

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