Welcome to New Leader Essentials

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Video No. 1: Introduction

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What are our goals?

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The Mission of the Boy Scouts of America:
To prepare young people to make ethical choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

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Aims of the Boy Scouts of America
• Character development • Citizenship training • Mental and physical fitness

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How do we develop character?

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Character encompasses a person’s personal qualities, values, and outlook.

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Scouting helps young people grow:
• • • • • • • •
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Being confident but not conceited Being honest with themselves and others Having a positive personal appearance Developing special skills and interests Taking care of themselves Doing their best in difficult situations Practicing their religious beliefs Showing respect for other people

How do we train for citizenship?

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Scouts are encouraged to
• Learn about and take pride in their national heritage. • Develop an understanding of our social, economic, and governmental systems. • Be of service to others. • Have knowledge and respect for other cultures and social groups.

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Scouts are encouraged to :
• Be aware of community organizations and their functions. • Understand and respect the ethnic and social relationships in their communities. • Appreciate the environment and seek to protect it.

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How do we develop mental and physical fitness?

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Scouting encourages
• • • • • • •
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Exercise and participation in vigorous activities. Adopting healthy habits. Keeping weight within a healthy range. Avoiding use of tobacco, drugs, and alcohol. Striving to be mentally awake. Using good judgment. Being resourceful in solving problems.

The Programs of Scouting
• Cub Scouting is for boys in the first through fifth grades or ages 7 through 10. • Boy Scouting is for boys ages 11 through 17. • Varsity Scouting is for boys 14 through 17. • Venturing is for young men and women ages 14 through 20.

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Methods: Cub Scouting
(Boys first through fifth grades)
• • • • • • •
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Ideals Den Advancement Family involvement Activities Home-and neighborhood-centered Uniform

Methods: Boy Scouting/Varsity Scouting
• • • • • • • •
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Ideals Patrol Advancement Adult association Outdoors Personal growth Leadership Uniform

(Boys 11 through 17)

Methods: Venturing
(Young men and women 14 through 20)
• • • • • • •
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Ideals Group activities Recognition Adult association High adventure Teaching others Leadership

Our goal is to be continually moving youth from dependence on adult direction to independence.

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The Cub Scout Promise
I, (name), promise to do my best to do my duty to God and my country, to help other people, and to obey the Law of the Pack.

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The Scout Oath
On my honor I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight.

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The Venturing Oath
As a Venturer, I promise to do my duty to God and help strengthen America, to help others, and to seek truth, fairness, and adventure in our world.

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Unit Scenarios

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Assemble both rock walls in a “V” shape.

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How do youth grow and develop?

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Video No. 2: Ages and Stages

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Place one bridge support in each rock wall.

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Where do I fit in?

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Video No. 3: Scouting Begins With You

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Connect one of the bridge spans to the supports

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Where do I get help?

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What human resources are available?

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How do we recruit and retain other volunteers?
• • • • • Have a positive attitude. Expect people to volunteer. Be specific. Express gratitude. Create specific jobs. • Start with small jobs. • Don’t assume a “no.” • Busy people make the best leaders. • Ask, ask, ask….

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Parental Survey form

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Scouting’s Districts and Councils

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Scouting’s Volunteers and Professionals

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Include it in  your  unit budget plan!

Boys’ Life and Scouting Magazines

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Scout Center/Trading Post
• • • • Literature Advancement records Information about upcoming events People with answers to program questions

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Connect the other bridge span to the supports.

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Who pays for Scouting?
• • • • • Youth and their families Chartered organizations and their units Communities Local council National Council

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• • • • • • • •
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What do youth and their families pay for ?
Uniform and insignia Books and materials Personal equipment Activity costs Annual registration fee Boys’ Life subscription Weekly unit dues Contributions to Friends of Scouting and United Way

What do chartered organizations provide?
• A meeting place • Selection and approval of adult leadership

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What do units provide?
• Program materials and equipment • Advancement/recognition items • Special events

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How does the community support the local council?
• • • • • •
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Friends of Scouting contributions United Way Product sales Special projects Events Bequests and other planned gifts

What does the council provide?
• • • • • • • • Camping facilities Training for leaders Service for new and existing units Local service center Activities and events Liability insurance Supplies and materials Professional staff

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What does the National Council do?
• • • • • Supports local councils Conducts program research and development Develops literature and materials Provides professional training Operates national high-adventure and training facilities • Conducts national events
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Connect the path to the two bridge spans.

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Scout Song

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How do we keep Scouting safe?

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Video No. 4: How do I keep Scouting Safe?

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Connect a ladder to one side of the bridge.

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Video No. 5: Closing

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Connect the other ladder to the other side of the bridge.

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Your Bridge into Scouting!

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