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NURSING 1263

Introduction to Aging

Overview

Explore the impact of societal myths and attitudes related to older adults Understand the concept of population aging Discuss the demographics of an aging Canadian population Examine the impact of an aging population on health care costs

Aging and Older Adults: Why Pay Attention?


Brainstorm

Aging and Older Adults: Why Pay Attention?

Population Aging: Adding Years to Life

Life Span
The fixed, finite maximum limit of survival for a species in the absence of disease or life threatening trauma

Jeanne Calment at ages 60 and 121

Population Aging: Adding Years to Life

Life Expectancy
The average number of years a person is expected to live

Life expectancy has increased in the last 50 years and is still projected to continue to increase

Population Aging: Adding Years to Life

Life expectancy is influenced by many factors

Culture Geography Gender Ethnicity Race Education Personal health practices

Population Aging

Increase in our aging population

Increased life expectancy Decreased birth rates

Population Aging
Discussion: What implications does the concept of an aging population have on society and how does it influence our social construction of the elderly?

Attitudes, Myths, Stereotypes

Attitudes, Myths and Stereotypes

Attitudes, Myths and Stereotypes

Attitudes, Myths and Stereotypes

Attitudes, Myths and Stereotypes

Implications

Ageism
Definition: Negative attitudes towards older adults resulting in the belief that they cannot or should not participate in societal activities or be given the same opportunities as other members of a population (Hollan-Bell & Brummel-Smith, 1999)

Ageism: Why Does it Occur?

Ageism

Consequences:

Potentially altered treatment and access to care Decreased sense of power, control and dignity Loss of hope as valuable contributing members of society Negative influence on policy and care decisions

Ageism: Take a Hard Look!

Ageism
Discussion:

Combating Ageism: Strategies

Combating Ageism: Strategies

Demographic Trends: Population Projections


Older Canadians are living longer and with fewer disabilities than previous generations Population projections: 2011 - ~15% of population 2021- ~18% of population 2031- ~23% to 25% 2056- ~ 25% to 30% of population
(Statistics Canada, 2010)

Demographic Trends: Population Projections

Demographic Trends: Community vs Institutional Living


Over 90% of older Canadians live independently in the community and want to live there Presently ~7% of older Canadians live in long-term care settings-those below age 74 14% older Canadians, >75 years, live in long-term care settings (Public Health Agency of Canada, 2006)

Demographic Trends: Ethnicity


2001: 19.4% of the immigrant population in Canada was over 65, while the national average was 13%

Aboriginal seniors make up a small proportion of the population, but the number of Aboriginal seniors is expected to triple between 1996 and 2016 (Government of Canada, 2002)

Demographic Trends: Gender


Men who survive to age 65 can expect to live an additional 17.4 years; women can expect to live an additional 20.8 years (Statistics Canada, 2005) Approximately 57% of Canadian seniors are female Approximately 70% of Canadian seniors above age 85 are female (Health Canada, 2002)

Demographic Trends: Chronic Illness


81% of seniors living in the community have at least 1 chronic condition and 33% have 3 or more (compared with 12% of younger adults) Most chronic diseases represent a combination of modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors Key modifiable risk factors include diet, physical activity, and tobacco use (Gilmore & Park, 2006)

Demographic Trends: Chronic Illness


The underlying causes of chronic disease are a reflection of the social, economic and physical environments that impact health and healthy aging
(WHO, 2005)

Senior women are more likely than men to have arthritis, glaucoma and back problems
(Gilmore & Park, 2006)

Demographic Trends: Chronic Illness


Senior men have higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, cancer, stroke, and Alzheimers disease (Gilmore & Park, 2006)

Between 10 and 15 percent of seniors living in the community suffer from depressive symptoms (Conn, 2002)

Demographic Trends: Chronic Illness


Late life dementias, including Alzheimers affect 8% of seniors over 65 and 25% of seniors over age 80
(Canadian Study of Health & Aging Working Group, 1994)

Health Care Costs of Aging

Diagnosing, treating and managing chronic conditions are expensive

In 2003, seniors health care needs accounted for more tan 44% of all provincial government health spending
(CIHI, 2005)

Health Care Costs of Aging

Health Care Costs of Aging: Trends

Better Health Now Compared to 20 Years Ago

Better quality of life

Better Health Today

Less need for long term care

Reduced length of disability

Health Care Costs of Aging: Trends

Impacts of Improved Health Care Services

Health Care Costs of Aging: Trends

Shift to Providing More Services in Outpatient and Community Settings

Improving Population Aging

Improving Population Aging

Healthy Aging

Film: The Art of Aging