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Cumulative tense review

Lets review everything we have learned so far!

Present, Past and Future Tenses

Situations Construction of the tenses, the past participle Affirmative form of the verb Negative form of the verb Interrogative form of the verb Clauses Review

LAST LESSON! Future Tenses Review

Homework keys
By this time next summer, you will have completed your studies and will have found a job. I, on the other hand, I will have accomplished anything. I will be studying and you will be working in some new high paying job. Michael: Do you think the Republicans or the Democrats are going to win the next election? Jane: I think the Republicans are going to win the next election. John: No way! The Democrats are going to win . I am sick of rain and bad weather! Hopefully, when we wake up tomorrow morning, the sun will be shining . If you need to contact me sometime next week, I will be staying at the Sheraton in San Francisco. Susan: We are going to go camping this weekend. Would you like to come along? Sam: That sounds great, but I don't have a sleeping bag. Susan: No problem. I will lend you one. My family has tons of camping gear.

Lets Begin

Present Continuous & Present Simple


Present Simple is used: 1. for Permanent Situations She works in an office. Present Continuous is used: 1. for temporary situations It is raining today and they are staying in the house. 2. for actions happening at or around the time of speaking He is looking for a new job at the moment. 3. with always to express annoyance or criticism You are always watching football match on TV .

2. for repeated actions in the present He often buys her flowers

3. for facts which are permanently true The sun sets in the west.

PRESENT PERFECT AND PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS


Present Perfect
The Result, The experience I have written 5 letters

Present Perfect Continuous


The process, the duration I have been writing for an hour.

PRESENT PERFECT AND PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS


Present Perfect
The Result, The experience I have written 5 letters

Present Perfect Continuous


The process, the duration I have been writing for an hour. Side effect Why are you so wet? - I have been washing the car.

Desired result I have washed the car. The car is clean now

PRESENT PERFECT AND PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS


Present Perfect
The Result, The experience I have written 5 letters

Present Perfect Continuous


The process, the duration I have been writing for an hour. Side effect Why are you so wet? - I have been washing the car.

Desired result I have washed the car. The car is clean now

Permanent situation James has lived in this town for 10 years.

Temporary situation. James has been living here for a year.

Present Simple is used: 1. for Permanent Situations She works in an office.

Present Continuous is used: 1. for temporary situations It is raining today and they are staying in the house.

Present Perfect

Present Perfect Continuous The process, the duration I have been writing for an hour.

The Result, The experience I have written 5 letters

2. for repeated actions in the present He often buys her flowers

2. for actions happening at or around the time of speaking He is looking for a new job at the moment. 3. with always to express annoyance or criticism You are always watching football match on TV .

Desired result I have washed the car. The car is clean now

Side effect Why are you so wet? - I have been washing the car.

3. for facts which are permanently true The sun sets in the west.

Permanent situation James has lived in this town for 10 years.

Temporary situation. James has been living here for a year.

Present Simple and Present Continuous time expressions


Present simple every day/morning/ week

Present Simple and Present Continuous time expressions


Present simple every day/morning/ week

in the morning/evening/

Present Simple and Present Continuous time expressions


Present simple every day/morning/ week

in the morning/evening/

always, usually, often, sometimes, seldom, rarely, never

Present Simple and Present Continuous time expressions


Present simple every day/morning/ week Present continuous now at the moment At the moment i'm walking in the park.

in the morning/evening/

always, usually, often, sometimes, seldom, rarely, never

Present Simple and Present Continuous time expressions


Present simple every day/morning/ week Present continuous now at the moment At the moment i'm walking in the park. Always He is always smoking!

in the morning/evening/

always, usually, often, sometimes, seldom, rarely, never

Present Simple and Present Continuous time expressions


Present simple every day/morning/ week Present continuous now at the moment At the moment i'm walking in the park. Always He is always smoking!

in the morning/evening/

always, usually, often, sometimes, seldom, rarely, never

tonight this week/ month/year We are going out tonight. I'm cleaning my .apartment this week

PRESENT PERFECT AND PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS Key Words

Present Perfect how often... times

Present Perfect Continuous how long Since for

PRESENT PERFECT AND PRESENT PERFECT CONTINUOUS Key Words

Present Perfect how often... times

Present Perfect Continuous how long Since for I have been writing for an hour.

I have been to London twice.

Present simple every day/morning/ week

Present continuous Present Perfect now at the moment At the moment i'm walking in the park. how often... times

Present Perfect Continuous how long Since for

in the Always morning/evening He is always / smoking!

I have been to London twice.

I have been writing for an hour.

always, usually, often, sometimes, seldom, rarely, never

tonight this week/ month/year We are going out tonight. I'm cleaning my apartment this week

Homework!
Samantha: Just think, next week at this time, I (lie) on a tropical beach in Maui drinking Mai Tais and eating pineapple. Darren: While you are luxuriating on the beach, I (stress) out over this marketing project. How are you going to enjoy yourself knowing that I am working so hard? Samantha: I 'll manage somehow. Darren: You're terrible. Can't you take me with you? Samantha: No. But I (send) you a postcard of a beautiful, white sand beach. Darren: Great, that (make) me feel much better. Oliver: When are going to get your bachelor's degree, Anne? Anne: I am going to finish my degree next June. By the time I graduate, I (go) to four different colleges and universities, and I (study) for more than seven years. Oliver: Wow, that's a long time! Anne: And I plan to continue on to get a Ph.D.

Present Continuous & Present Simple


Construction

Present Continuous & Present Simple Construction

Present perfect and present perfect continuous Construction


Affirmative form Subject+ to have (corresponding form in present simple)+ past participle I have done something productive today. Affirmative form Subject+has/have + been + present participle She has been listening to this song on repeat for the past hour.

Present perfect and present perfect continuous Construction


Affirmative form Subject+ to have (corresponding form in present simple)+ past participle I have done something productive today. Negative form Subject+ to have + not (corresponding form in present simple)+ past participle He hasnt been to Australia. Affirmative form Subject+has/have + been + present participle She has been listening to this song on repeat for the past hour. Negative form Subject + has/have+ not + been + present participle

She hasnt been practicing her French.

Present perfect and present perfect continuous Construction


Affirmative form Subject+ to have (corresponding form in present simple)+ past participle I have done something productive today. Negative form Subject+ to have + not (corresponding form in present simple)+ past participle He hasnt been to Australia. Affirmative form Subject+has/have + been + present participle She has been listening to this song on repeat for the past hour. Negative form Subject + has/have+ not + been + present participle

Interrogative form to have (corresponding form in present simple)+ Subject + past participle
Have you washed the dishes yet?

She hasnt been practicing her French.


Interrogative form Has/have + Subject + been + present participle Has she been practicing French lately? She sounds good!

Present tenses exercise


1. It is already 9:30 PM and I (wait) here for over an hour. If John does not get here in the next five minutes, I am going to leave. 2. I was really angry at John yesterday. By the time he finally arrived, I (wait) for over an hour. I almost left without him. 3. Did you hear that Ben was fired last month? He (work) for that import company for more than ten years and he (work) in almost every department. Nobody knew the company like he did. 4. I (see) many pictures of the pyramids before I went to Egypt. Pictures of the monuments are very misleading. The pyramids are actually quite small. 5. Sarah (climb) the Matterhorn, (sail) around the world, and (go) on safari in Kenya. She is such an adventurous person. 6. Sarah (climb) the Matterhorn, (sail) around the world and (go)

Present tenses exercise


1. It is already 9:30 PM and I (wait) here for over an hour. If John does not get here in the next five minutes, I am going to leave. 2. I was really angry at John yesterday. By the time he finally arrived, I (wait) for over an hour. I almost left without him. 3. Did you hear that Ben was fired last month? He (work) for that import company for more than ten years and he (work) in almost every department. Nobody knew the company like he did. 4. I (see) many pictures of the pyramids before I went to Egypt. Pictures of the monuments are very misleading. The pyramids are actually quite small. 5. Sarah (climb) the Matterhorn, (sail) around the world, and (go) on safari in Kenya. She is such an adventurous person. 6. Sarah (climb) the Matterhorn, (sail) around the world and (go)

Video Time!

LINKhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cEXwjclU0Q8

Past Simple situations


1. Actions finished at a stated time in the past We moved out of our house last year. 2. Actions are not connected with the present He saw Jennifer Lopez 3. Actions happened one after the other (chain) I had breakfast, put on my coat and left the house

Past Continuous situations

Interrupted action in the past Specific Time as an Interruption With "always" to express annoyance or criticism Parallel actions To illustrate the atmosphere To express politeness

Past Perfect situations


The Past Perfect expresses the idea that something occurred before another action in the past. It can also show that something happened before a specific time in the past. I had never seen such a beautiful beach before I went to Kauai. With Non-Continuous Verbs and some non-continuous uses of Mixed Verbs, we use the Past Perfect to show that something started in the past and continued up until another action in the past. We had had that car for ten years before it broke down. Unlike with the Present Perfect, it is possible to use specific time words or phrases with the Past Perfect. Although this is possible, it is usually not necessary. She had visited her Japanese relatives once in 1993 before she moved in with them in 1996.

Past Perfect Continuous situations


We use the Past Perfect Continuous to show that something started in the past and continued up until another time in the past. Using the Past Perfect Continuous before another action in the past is a good way to show cause and effect. We use it when reporting things said in the past.

Tenses review
Past Simple

We can use the past simple to talk about actions and states which we see as completed in the past.

He told me all about his childhood.

Tenses review
Past Simple Past Continuous

We can use the past simple to talk about actions and states which we see as completed in the past.

We can use the past continuous to talk about past events which went on for a period of time.

He told me all about his I was walking in the childhood. street when I suddenly fell over.

Tenses review
Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect

We can use the past simple to talk about actions and states which we see as completed in the past.

We can use the past continuous to talk about past events which went on for a period of time.

We can use the past perfect simple to talk about what happened before a point in the past. It looks back from a point in the past to further in the past. I thought we had already decided on a name for this product.

He told me all about his I was walking in the childhood. street when I suddenly fell over.

Tenses review
Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect Continuous
We can use the past perfect continuous to look back at a situation in progress.

We can use the past simple to talk about actions and states which we see as completed in the past.

We can use the past continuous to talk about past events which went on for a period of time.

We can use the past perfect simple to talk about what happened before a point in the past. It looks back from a point in the past to further in the past. I thought we had already decided on a name for this product.

He told me all about his I was walking in the childhood. street when I suddenly fell over.

It had been snowing for a while before we left.

Tenses and time expressions


Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect Continuous
By - by a certain time in the past o For- for a certain period of time o How Long and Beforeemphasizes duration and the event interrupting the process

Yesterday Last... ...Ago Time and date indicators in 1990/ at 5 pm/ on Sunday

Always Before Used with "always or By constantly to express Already annoyance or criticism While -To talk about parallel actions As To talk about actions as a background for the main action

Affirmative form construction


Past Simple

Subject+ verb in past simple I enjoyed the film

Affirmative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous

Subject+ verb in past simple

Subject + (verb "to be" (corresponding form in the past) ) + present participle (verb-ing) I was working

I enjoyed the film

Affirmative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect

Subject+ verb in past simple

Subject + (verb "to be" (corresponding form in the past) ) + present participle (verb-ing) I was working

Subject + Auxiliary verb had + Past Participle

I enjoyed the film

We had left

Affirmative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect Continuous
Subject + Auxiliary verb had + Auxiliary verb been + Present participle It had been snowing

Subject+ verb in past simple

Subject + (verb "to be" (corresponding form in the past) ) + present participle (verb-ing) I was working

Subject + Auxiliary verb had + Past Participle

I enjoyed the film

We had left

Negative form construction


Past Simple

Subject+auxiliary verb "to do" in past simple (negative form)+ verb (infinitive) I did not enjoy the film

Negative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous

Subject+auxiliary verb "to do" in past simple (negative form)+ verb (infinitive) I did not enjoy the film

Subject + (verb "to be" (corresponding form in the past) )+not + present participle (verb-ing) I was not working

Negative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect

Subject+auxiliary verb "to do" in past simple (negative form)+ verb (infinitive) I did not enjoy the film

Subject + (verb "to be" (corresponding form in the past) )+not + present participle (verb-ing) I was not working

Subject + Auxiliary verb had+ not + Past Participle

We had not left

Negative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect Continuous

Subject+auxiliary verb "to do" in past simple (negative form)+ verb (infinitive) I did not enjoy the film

Subject + (verb "to be" (corresponding form in the past) )+not + present participle (verb-ing) I was not working

Subject + Auxiliary verb Subject + Auxiliary verb had+ not + Past Participle had+not + Auxiliary verb been + Present participle We had not left It had not been snowing

Interrogative form construction


Past Simple

auxiliary verb "to do" in past simple + Subject+ verb (infinitive) Did you to the gym yesterday?

Interrogative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous

auxiliary verb "to do" in past simple + Subject+ verb (infinitive) Did you to the gym yesterday?

"Verb "to be" + subject + verb-ing" Was she working?

Interrogative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect

auxiliary verb "to do" in past simple + Subject+ verb (infinitive) Did you to the gym yesterday?

"Verb "to be" + subject + verb-ing" Was she working?

Auxiliary verb had + Subject + Past Participle Had she arrived?

Interrogative form construction


Past Simple Past Continuous Past Perfect Past Perfect Continuous
Auxiliary verb had + Subject + Auxiliary verb been + Present participle Had it been snowing?

auxiliary verb "to do" in past simple + Subject+ verb (infinitive) Did you to the gym yesterday?

"Verb "to be" + subject + verb-ing"

Auxiliary verb had + Subject + Past Participle

Was she working?

Had she arrived?

Past tenses exercise


My English is really getting better. I (try) to learn the language since 1985, but only recently have I been able to make some real progress. By the time I started high school in 1988, I (study) the language for almost three years; however, I was only able to introduce myself Continuous few memorized sentences. ForPast Perfect a couple more Past and utter a Past Perfect Continuous years, I (struggle) through grammar and vocabulary lessons, which made absolutely no difference. Nothing worked, so I decided to study abroad. I found an exchange program in England that sounded like the perfect answer. I (stay) with a host family for one month. It was a huge disappointment! I (sit) there the whole time staring at the host mother and father hoping that there would be some breakthrough. Nothing. When I returned, I mentioned to a friend that I (have) problems with the language for years. He recommended that I spend a year in an English speaking country. I decided to go abroad again. I (research) exchange programs for a couple of weeks and finally decided on a school in the United States. Well, it worked. I (live) and (study) in the U.S. for more than two years. I (stay) here for at least another year before I return home. By then, I should be completely fluent.

Past tenses exercise


My English is really getting better. I (try) to learn the language since 1985, but only recently have I been able to make some real progress. By the time I started high school in 1988, I (study) the language for almost three years; however, I was only able to introduce myself Continuous few memorized sentences. ForPast Perfect a couple more Past and utter a Past Perfect Continuous years, I (struggle) through grammar and vocabulary lessons, which made absolutely no difference. Nothing worked, so I decided to study abroad. I found an exchange program in England that sounded like the perfect answer. I (stay) with a host family for one month. It was a huge disappointment! I (sit) there the whole time staring at the host mother and father hoping that there would be some breakthrough. Nothing. When I returned, I mentioned to a friend that I (have) problems with the language for years. He recommended that I spend a year in an English speaking country. I decided to go abroad again. I (research) exchange programs for a couple of weeks and finally decided on a school in the United States. Well, it worked. I (live) and (study) in the U.S. for more than two years. I (stay) here for at least another year before I return home. By then, I should be completely fluent.

Non-Continuous Verbs

Abstract Verbs to be, to want, to cost, to seem, to need, to care, to contain, to owe, to exist... Possession Verbs to possess, to own, to belong... Emotion Verbs to like, to love, to hate, to dislike, to fear, to envy, to mind...

Mixed Verbs
to appear: to have: to hear to look to miss to see to smell to taste to think to weigh

Some Verbs Can Be Especially Confusing: to be Please NOTE: "to be" is rarely used in a continuous form. This is most commonly done when a person is temporarily behaving badly or stereotypically. It can also be used when someone's behavior is noticeably different. (Example: She was acting like a brat) to feel

New Orleans, Louisiana

LINK: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddt7cIAXLJg&featu re=relmfu

Future Simple To Express a Voluntary Action: A voluntary action is one the speaker offers to do for someone else, Similarly, we use "will not" or "won't" when we refuse to voluntarily do something. I will not do your homework for you.

Future Simple To Express a Voluntary Action: A voluntary action is one the speaker offers to do for someone else, Similarly, we use "will not" or "won't" when we refuse to voluntarily do something. I will not do your homework for you. Usually used in promises. If I am elected President of the United States, I will make sure everyone has access to inexpensive health insurance

Future Simple To Express a Voluntary Action: A voluntary action is one the speaker offers to do for someone else, Similarly, we use "will not" or "won't" when we refuse to voluntarily do something. I will not do your homework for you. Usually used in promises. If I am elected President of the United States, I will make sure everyone has access to inexpensive health insurance "Be going to" expresses that something is a plan. It expresses the idea that a person intends to do something in the future. He is going to spend his vacation in Hawaii.

Future Simple To Express a Voluntary Action: A voluntary action is one the speaker offers to do for someone else, Similarly, we use "will not" or "won't" when we refuse to voluntarily do something. I will not do your homework for you. Usually used in promises. If I am elected President of the United States, I will make sure everyone has access to inexpensive health insurance "Be going to" expresses that something is a plan. It expresses the idea that a person intends to do something in the future. He is going to spend his vacation in Hawaii. To Express a Prediction Both "will" and "be going to" can express the idea of a general prediction about the future. The year 2222 will be a very interesting year.

Future Simple To Express a Voluntary Action: A voluntary action is one the speaker offers to do for someone else, Similarly, we use "will not" or "won't" when we refuse to voluntarily do something. I will not do your homework for you. Usually used in promises. If I am elected President of the United States, I will make sure everyone has access to inexpensive health insurance "Be going to" expresses that something is a plan. It expresses the idea that a person intends to do something in the future. He is going to spend his vacation in Hawaii. To Express a Prediction Both "will" and "be going to" can express the idea of a general prediction about the future. The year 2222 will be a very interesting year.

Future Continuous An indication that that a longer action in the future will be interrupted by a shorter action in the future. I will be watching TV when she arrives tonight.

Future Simple To Express a Voluntary Action: A voluntary action is one the speaker offers to do for someone else, Similarly, we use "will not" or "won't" when we refuse to voluntarily do something. I will not do your homework for you. Usually used in promises. If I am elected President of the United States, I will make sure everyone has access to inexpensive health insurance "Be going to" expresses that something is a plan. It expresses the idea that a person intends to do something in the future. He is going to spend his vacation in Hawaii. To Express a Prediction Both "will" and "be going to" can express the idea of a general prediction about the future. The year 2222 will be a very interesting year.

Future Continuous An indication that that a longer action in the future will be interrupted by a shorter action in the future. I will be watching TV when she arrives tonight. In the Future Continuous, a specific time interrupts the action. She will be reading a book at 6 oclock

Future Simple To Express a Voluntary Action: A voluntary action is one the speaker offers to do for someone else, Similarly, we use "will not" or "won't" when we refuse to voluntarily do something. I will not do your homework for you. Usually used in promises. If I am elected President of the United States, I will make sure everyone has access to inexpensive health insurance "Be going to" expresses that something is a plan. It expresses the idea that a person intends to do something in the future. He is going to spend his vacation in Hawaii. To Express a Prediction Both "will" and "be going to" can express the idea of a general prediction about the future. The year 2222 will be a very interesting year.

Future Continuous An indication that that a longer action in the future will be interrupted by a shorter action in the future. I will be watching TV when she arrives tonight. In the Future Continuous, a specific time interrupts the action. She will be reading a book at 6 oclock Two actions happening at the same time: expresses the idea that both actions will be happening at the same time. The actions are parallel. I am going to be studying and he is going to be making dinner.

Future Simple To Express a Voluntary Action: A voluntary action is one the speaker offers to do for someone else, Similarly, we use "will not" or "won't" when we refuse to voluntarily do something. I will not do your homework for you. Usually used in promises. If I am elected President of the United States, I will make sure everyone has access to inexpensive health insurance "Be going to" expresses that something is a plan. It expresses the idea that a person intends to do something in the future. He is going to spend his vacation in Hawaii. To Express a Prediction Both "will" and "be going to" can express the idea of a general prediction about the future. The year 2222 will be a very interesting year.

Future Continuous An indication that that a longer action in the future will be interrupted by a shorter action in the future. I will be watching TV when she arrives tonight. In the Future Continuous, a specific time interrupts the action. She will be reading a book at 6 oclock Two actions happening at the same time: expresses the idea that both actions will be happening at the same time. The actions are parallel. I am going to be studying and he is going to be making dinner. To describe atmosphere at a specific point in the future. When I arrive at the party, everybody is going to be celebrating. Some will be dancing. Others are going to be talking.

Future Perfect The Future Perfect expresses the idea that something will occur before another action in the future. It can also show that something will happen before a specific time in the future. By next November, I will have received my promotion.

Future Perfect The Future Perfect expresses the idea that something will occur before another action in the future. It can also show that something will happen before a specific time in the future. By next November, I will have received my promotion. With Non-Continuous Verbs and some noncontinuous uses of Mixed Verbs, we use the Future Perfect to show that something will continue up until another action in the future. I will have been in London for six months by the time I leave.

Future Perfect The Future Perfect expresses the idea that something will occur before another action in the future. It can also show that something will happen before a specific time in the future. By next November, I will have received my promotion. With Non-Continuous Verbs and some noncontinuous uses of Mixed Verbs, we use the Future Perfect to show that something will continue up until another action in the future. I will have been in London for six months by the time I leave.

Future Perfect Cont. We use the Future Perfect Continuous to show that something will continue up until a particular event or time in the future. "For five minutes," "for two weeks," and "since Friday" are all durations which can be used with the Future Perfect Continuous. They will have been talking for over an hour by the time Thomas arrives.

Future Perfect The Future Perfect expresses the idea that something will occur before another action in the future. It can also show that something will happen before a specific time in the future. By next November, I will have received my promotion. With Non-Continuous Verbs and some noncontinuous uses of Mixed Verbs, we use the Future Perfect to show that something will continue up until another action in the future. I will have been in London for six months by the time I leave.

Future Perfect Cont. We use the Future Perfect Continuous to show that something will continue up until a particular event or time in the future. "For five minutes," "for two weeks," and "since Friday" are all durations which can be used with the Future Perfect Continuous. They will have been talking for over an hour by the time Thomas arrives. Using the Future Perfect Continuous before another action in the future is a good way to show cause and effect. Jason will be tired when he gets home because he will have been jogging for over an hour.

Time Expressions

Future Simple next week / month / year / April, June, etc. in + year / month tomorrow / tomorrow afternoon / tomorrow evening in + period of time + (time)

Time Expressions

Future Simple

Future Cont.

next week / month / at + time year / April, June, etc. while in + year / month tomorrow / tomorrow afternoon / tomorrow evening in + period of time + (time)

Time Expressions

Future Simple

Future Cont.

Future Perfect and Future Perfect cont. by + time

next week / month / at + time year / April, June, etc. while in + year / month tomorrow / tomorrow afternoon / tomorrow evening in + period of time + (time)

by the time + clause


Thomas will have passed all his exams by the time the school year finishes.

Clauses
Clauses

REMEMBER No Future in Time Clauses In all Future tenses, the future form cannot be used in clauses beginning with time expressions such as: when, while, before, after, by the time, as soon as, if, unless, etc. Instead, a present tense is used

Clauses
Clauses Examples

REMEMBER No Future in Time Clauses In all Future tenses, the future form cannot be used in clauses beginning with time expressions such as: when, while, before, after, by the time, as soon as, if, unless, etc. Instead, a present tense is used

I am going to see a movie when I will have finished my homework. Not Correct I am going to see a movie when I have finished my homework. Correct

Be going to
1) planned actions in the future We are going to sing at the party.

Be going to
1) planned actions in the future We are going to sing at the party.

2) You are certain that sth. is going to happen in the future. Look at this car! It is going to crash into the yellow one.

Construction Future Simple


[will + verb] You will help him later [am/is/are + going to + verb] You are going to meet Jane tonight.

With Will

With Be going to

Construction Future Simple


[will + verb] You will help him later

Future Cont.
[Subject + will be + present participle] You will be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight. [Subject + am/is/are + going to be + present participle] You are going to be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.

With Will

With Be going to

[am/is/are + going to + verb] You are going to meet Jane tonight.

Construction Future Simple


[will + verb] You will help him later With Will

Future Cont.
[Subject + will be + present participle] You will be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.

Future Perfect
[Subject + will have + past participle] You will have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S. Subject + [am/is/are + going to have + past participle] You are going to have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S.

[am/is/are + going to + verb] You are going to meet Jane tonight. With Be going to

[Subject + am/is/are + going to be + present participle] You are going to be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.

Construction Future Simple


[will + verb] You will help him later With Will

Future Cont.
[Subject + will be + present participle] You will be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.

Future Perfect
[Subject + will have + past participle] You will have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S. Subject + [am/is/are + going to have + past participle] You are going to have perfected your English by the time you come back from the U.S.

Future Perfect Cont.


[will have been + present participle] You will have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives.

[am/is/are + going to + verb] You are going to meet Jane tonight. With Be going to

[Subject + am/is/are + going to be + present participle] You are going to be waiting for her when her plane arrives tonight.

[am/is/are + going to have been + present participle] You are going to have been waiting for more than two hours when her plane finally arrives.

Future Tenses exercise

1. While you (study) at home, Magda (be) in class. 2. When I (get) to the party, Sally and Doug (dance) , John (make) drinks, Sue and Frank (discuss) something controversial, and Mary (complain) about something unimportant. They are always doing the same things. They are so predictable.

3. When you (get) off the plane, I (wait) for you.


4. I am sick of rain and bad weather! Hopefully, when we (wake) up tomorrow morning, the sun (shine) .

5. If you (need) to contact me sometime next week, I (stay) at the Sheraton in San Francisco.

Future Tenses exercise

1. While you (study) at home, Magda (be) in class. 2. When I (get) to the party, Sally and Doug (dance) , John (make) drinks, Sue and Frank (discuss) something controversial, and Mary (complain) about something unimportant. They are always doing the same things. They are so predictable.

3. When you (get) off the plane, I (wait) for you.


4. I am sick of rain and bad weather! Hopefully, when we (wake) up tomorrow morning, the sun (shine) .

5. If you (need) to contact me sometime next week, I (stay) at the Sheraton in San Francisco.

Final Exercise

1. When Carol (call) last night, I (watch) my favorite show on television. 2. I (work) for this company for more than thirty years, and I intend to stay here until I retire! 3. Sharon (love) to travel. She (go) abroad almost every summer. Next year, she plans to go to Peru. 4. Thomas is an author. He (write) mystery novels and travel memoirs. He (write) since he was twenty-eight. Altogether, he (write) seven novels, three collections of short stories and a book of poetry. 5. We were late because we had some car problems. By the time we (get) to the train station, Susan (wait) for us for more than two hours. 6. Sam (try) to change a light bulb when he (slip) and (fell) .

HOMEWORK!

1. Everyday I (wake) up at 6 o'clock, (eat) breakfast at 7 o'clock and (leave) for work at 8 o'clock. However, this morning I (get) up at 6:30, (skip) breakfast and (leave) for work late because I (forget) to set my alarm. 1. Right now, Jim (read) the newspaper and Kathy (make) dinner. Last night at this time, they (do) the same thing. She (cook) and he (read) the newspaper. Tomorrow at this time, they (do, also) the same thing. She (prepare) dinner and he (read) . They are very predictable people! 1. By this time next summer, you (complete) your studies and (find) a job. I, on the other hand, (accomplish, not) anything. I (study, still) and you (work) in some new high paying job. 1. The students (be, usually) taught by Mrs. Monty. However, this week they (be) taught by Mr. Tanzer.

, , .

NEXT LESSON!

Present Simple & Present Continuous for the future, Future Simple & be going to

Thank you! Have a wonderful day!