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Ketchup is America's favorite condiment, being found in 97 percent of kitchens.

Studies show tomato ketchup can also be a powerful tool in the fight against cancer and heart disease. You

Seventeenth century English sailors first discovered the delights of this Chinese condiment and brought it west. Ketchup was first mentioned in print around 1690. might be surprised to learn that ketchup is not limited to plain tomato varieties.

Early tomato versions were much thinner with a consistency more like a soy or Worcestershire sauce

Other manufacturers may use different methods or use a simple use-by date on the bottle or label. Unopened bottles of ketchup may be stored up to one year in a cool, dry place. Once opened, you may store it in a cool environment, away from sun and/or heat, for about 1 month. For longer shelf life after opening, refrigeration is recommended. Refer to expiration dates on the container.

Storing opened ketchup in a heated environment such as in direct sunlight or in a kitchen that is constantly hot can invite fermentation which can actually cause a minor explosion when opening the container. Exposure to direct sunlight will also darken ketchup. To keep homemade ketchup's bright red color, wrap jars in tin foil.

Lycopene is an antioxidant which purportedly fights the free radicals that can interfere with normal cell growth and activity, potentially leading to cancer, heart disease and premature aging. One tablespoon of ketchup has 16 calories and no fat

Government standard regulations for ketchup or catsup basically state the ingredients include: cooked and strained tomato sauce, vinegar, sugar, salt, onion or garlic flavors, and spices such as cinnamon, allspice, Old grading standards dating back to 1953 dictated ketchup that flowed 9 centimeters in thirty seconds received the Grade A rating. The standards were revised in 1991 so that now Grade A ketchup need only ooze 3 to 7 centimeters in thirty seconds to make the grade. In other words, this means the old ketchup used to be thinner. Today's ketchup is thicker. But it is important to realize that in the 18th and 19th centuries ketchup was a generic term for sauces whose only common ingredient was vinegar.

One hundred years later, New Englanders created the definitive tomato ketchup when Maine seamen returned from Mexico and the Spanish West Indies with seeds of an exotic New World fruit called tomato. The tangy tomato ketchup quickly became a popular sauce for codfish cakes, meat, and other foods. Making ketchup at home was a tedious, day-long process. The tomato mixture, cooked in heavy iron kettles at wood-burning stoves, required constant stirring to prevent it from burning. Scouring the preserving kettles meticulously was also no easy task. To the relief of many homemakers, ketchup became commercially available in the second half of the 1800s.

F. & J. Heinz Company began selling tomato ketchup in 1876. By the end of the nineteenth century, tomato ketchup was the primary type of ketchup in the United States, and the decriptor of tomato was gradually dropped.

Other manufacturers may use different methods or use a simple use-by date on the bottle or label.

Unopened bottles of ketchup may be stored up to one year in a cool, dry place. Once opened, you may store it in a cool environment, away from sun and/or heat, for about 1 month. For longer shelf life after opening, refrigeration is recommended. Refer to expiration dates on the container.

Storing opened ketchup in a heated environment such as in direct sunlight or in a kitchen that is constantly hot can invite fermentation which can actually cause a minor explosion when opening the container. Exposure to direct sunlight will also darken ketchup. To keep homemade ketchup's bright red color, wrap jars in tin foil.

Fast food ketchup junkies may be interested in condiment packet gallery collection of individualized ketchup packets (click on each for a larger view). Use ketchup to clean your copper utensils. The acid removes tarnish and shines up copper.

Some of the commonly used preservatives during the 19th century included benzoate of soda, borax salicylic acid, benzoic, and formaldehyde, all of which could pose health risks when consumed in large quantities. A series of Pure Food Laws beginning in 1906 banned the use of the harmful preservatives. The quality of ketchup is insured by taking samples of the product during various stages of production. Tomato growers must comply with regulations set by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration regarding the use of fertilizers and pesticides.

A bottle of ketchup made by H. J. Heinz Company, the largest distributor of ketchup in the world Ketchup is often used with french fries (chips in the UK), hamburgers, sandwiches and grilled or fried meat. Ketchup is also used as a base for various sauces.

It is a typical accompaniment for the meat pies of Australia and New Zealand

Nutritional Values: The Nutritional Value for: catsup

Quantity 1 cup 1 tbsp

Energy (calories) 290 15

Carbs (grams) 69 4

Protein (grams) 5 0

Cholesterol (milligrams) 0 0

Weight (grams) 273 15

Fat (grams) 1 0

Saturated Fat (grams) 0.2 0

Tomato ketchup was sold locally by farmers. A man named Jonas Yerks (or Yerkes) is believed to have been the first man to make tomato ketchup a national phenomenon. By 1837, he had produced and distributed the condiment nationally. F. & J. Heinz launched their tomato ketchup in 1876.[8] Heinz tomato ketchup was advertised: "Blessed relief for Mother and the other women in the household!", a slogan which alluded to the lengthy and onerous process required to produce tomato ketchup in the home.

Later innovations

In fast food outlets, ketchup is often dispensed in small packets that hold ketchup inside. Users tear the side or top and squeeze the ketchup out of the ketchup packets.

In 2010, Heinz began offering an alternate squeeze and dip cup intended to offer a cleaner method of dispensing the product
Previously fast food outlets dispensed ketchup from pumps into paper cups. This method has made a resurgence in the first decade of the 21st century with cost and environmental concerns increasing of individual packets.

Ketchup has health benefits which are offset by the salt and sugar content. Ketchup is a source of lycopene, an antioxidant which may help prevent some forms of cancer. This is particularly true of the organic brands of ketchup, which have three times as much lycopene.
Ketchup, much like marinara sauce and other cooked tomato foods, yields higher levels of lycopene per serving because cooking makes lycopene in tomatoes more bio-available.

"Fancy" Ketchup

Some ketchup in the U.S. (including McDonald's ketchup) is labeled "Fancy". This is a USDA grade, relating to specific gravity. Fancy ketchup has a higher tomato solid concentration than other USDA grades.
Grade Fancy Extra Standard Standard 1.15 1.13 1.11 Specific Gravity 33% 29% 25% Total Solids