Pankaj Joge pankaj.joge@dishamail.

com Mobile # 9617661234

WHAT IS DATABASE?
 Collection of Coherent data with some

Inherent meaning.
 Database

are

designed,

built

and

populated with data for a specific purpose
 Example: Postal Address and what else?

 Difference between Address Book and

Postal Address
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Examples of database in real life

 A telephone book  T.V. Guide  Airline reservation system

 Motor vehicle registration records  Papers in your filing cabinet  Files on your computer.

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DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
 System that helps in managing data
 Allows inserting, updating, deleting and processing.  Examples: Oracle, Ingress, Sybase, Dbase 3+, Foxbase,

Foxpro, MS Access, Dataease, Dataflex and so on..
 Objects, their attributes and the relationship between

them (that are of interest to us) are stored in the database

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DBMS Vs File Management System
 A FMS is how data is stored on computer in Drives
 By placing data electronically in files.  These files are then stored in specific locations on the

hard disk (directories).  If the user wishes to perform some operation he has to scroll through all the data by himself in order to see the data he is interested in.  A user has to know where he put the files that contain the data and also if there are multiple files.
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DBMS Vs File Management System
 A Database Management System intends to :
 Remove the burden of manually locating data.  Having to scroll through it by allowing the user to

create a logical structure for the data beforehand.
 Allowing the user to place the data in the database that

the DBMS is managing.

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Functions of DBMS
• DATA DEFINITION • DATA MAINTENANCE • DATA MANIPULATION • DATA DISPLAY • DATA INTEGRITY
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Benefits of DBMS
 Establishes Relationships between Data
 No data inconsistencies  Reduction of data redundancy

 Data can be shared by single or multiple users
 Standards can be set and followed  Data integrity can be maintained

 Security of the data can be simply implemented
 Data independence can be achieved
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Shortcomings
 COST

 COMPLEXITY
 Problems Associated With

CENTRALISATION

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Database Architecture
 A 2-Tier Architecture

CLIENT

SERVER

 The server holds both the application and the data.  The application resides in the server.  Server will have more processing power and disk space .
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Database Architecture
 A 3-Tier Architecture
APPLICATION

CLIENT

DATABASE

SERVER

SERVER

 The data and applications are split onto separate servers.  The client is a front end simply requesting & displaying

data.
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DATABASE MODELS
 Databases appeared in the late 1960s, at a time when

the need for a flexible information management system had arisen.
 There are three models of

DBMS, which are distinguished based on how they represent the data contained

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THREE DBMS MODELS

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RELATIONAL DBMS
 DBMS that is based on the relational model as 


introduced by Dr. Edgar F. Codd Stores data in the form of related tables Powerful because they require few assumptions about how data is related or how it will be extracted from the database Same database can be viewed in many different ways Single database can be spread across several tables

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Have a nice day

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