Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readTech
Our Data, Ourselves
CONCENTRATED IN A FEW HANDS, big data is a threat to democracy. Social media companies and political data-mining firms such as Cambridge Analytica have built their businesses by manipulating public life using personal data. Their work has helped heig
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min read
Those Who Dare to Bare Their Hair
MASIH ALINEJAD HASN’T LIVED IN IRAN FOR A DECADE. But that hasn’t stopped her from becoming the driving force behind the largest, most sustained civil disobedience movement that the country has seen in recent years. Her focus is the mandatory headsc
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readPolitics
The Occupation as Entertainment
The second season of the acclaimed TV thriller Fauda obscures the dark realities of Israeli rule in the West Bank.
Foreign Policy Magazine10 min read
How Conservation Became Colonialism
Indigenous people, not environmentalists, are the key to protecting the world’s most precious ecosystems.
Foreign Policy Magazine14 min read
How Venezuela Struck It Poor
THE TRAGIC—AND TOTALLY AVOIDABLE—SELF-DESTRUCTION OF ONE OF THE WORLD’S RICHEST OIL ECONOMIES.
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min read
Contributors
Christina Larson is an award-winning foreign correspondent and science journalist based in Beijing and a former FOREIGN POLICY editor. She has reported from nearly a dozen countries in Asia. Her features have appeared in the New York Times, Wired, Sc
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readTech
From The Editor In Chief
IN THE LAST FEW YEARS, it has felt like every big election has focused on jobs and the threats they (supposedly) face: from trade, from immigrants, and, most accurately, from technology. No wonder. Until recently, the forecasts were almost unanimous
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min read
Pride And Prejudice In Tehran
MISCOMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND IRAN is nothing new. But now that U.S. President Donald Trump has withdrawn from the nuclear deal with Iran, guaranteeing that tensions will worsen in the months ahead, those hoping to avoid a crisis sho
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readPolitics
Rwanda, La Fin Du Silence (French)
Rwanda, la fin du silence (French) GUILLAUME ANCEL, LES BELLES LETTRES, 250 PP., $24.30, MARCH 2018 IN JUNE 1994, GUILLAUME ANCEL, a French Army captain fresh off a mission to Cambodia, was dispatched to Rwanda with the French Foreign Legion. He wa
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min read
Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World
Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World ADAM TOOZE, VIKING, 720 PP., $35, AUGUST 2018 WHAT DO THE 2008 FINANCIAL CRISIS, the eurozone debt crisis, Brexit, and the election of U.S. President Donald Trump have in common? Quite a b
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min read
Why India Gives Uber 5 Stars
IN DEVELOPED NATIONS, the so-called gig economy has become a controversial and polarizing topic. The argument in favor is well known, especially for consumers: Uber has made it easier to hail a ride; TaskRabbit provides instant armies of plumbers, pa
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readPolitics
South Koreans Learn to Love the Other
FROM JAPAN TO THE UNITED KINGDOM, developed countries face a two-pronged problem: aging populations and a deepening hostility toward the immigrants who could keep their aging economies growing. One country may have found the answer to both. In South
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min read
Protect Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself
IN THE LONG RUN, automation might replace all humans in the manufacturing sector. But until then, there will be a fierce competition among countries for the manufacturing jobs that remain. And the first step to winning that battle is realizing the be
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readFashion & Beauty
Closing the Factory Doors
For two centuries, countries have used low-wage labor to climb out of poverty. What will happen when robots take those jobs?
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readPolitics
1 Billion People. 100,000 Characters. 1 Typewriter.
ALL BUREAUCRACIES PRODUCE mountains of paperwork, and Mao Zedong’s sprawling authoritarian regime in China was certainly no exception. To process it all, the country needed a very special typewriter: the Double Pigeon. Under Mao, the Double Pigeon, k
Foreign Policy Magazine8 min read
A Modest Proposal
WHEN THE HARVARD UNIVERSITY POLITICAL THEORIST JUDITH SHKLAR died in 1992 at age 63, she was better known than she had ever been but still did not occupy center stage of U.S. intellectual life. Unlike the more widely celebrated older generation of po
Foreign Policy Magazine13 min readSociety
Learning To Work With Robots
1 IN JANUARY, AMAZON OPENED AMAZON GO, a high-tech, cashierless convenience store in Seattle. There are no checkout lines and few employees. The only requirement to shop is downloading an app. Customers just walk in, load up their bags, and go. There
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readPolitics
Invisible Countries: Journeys To The Edge Of Nationhood
Invisible Countries: Journeys to the Edge of Nationhood JOSHUA KEATING, YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 296 PP., $26, JUNE 2018 WHAT MAKES A COUNTRY A COUNTRY? And who gets to decide? Those questions are at the heart of Joshua Keating’s new book about place
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min read
Longtime Neighbors
IN THE LAST FEW YEARS, Poland’s far-right nationalists have worked hard to project an image of a country that is ethnically homogenous and overwhelmingly Catholic. But this nationalist vision overlooks inconvenient realities such as Podlaskie: a fore
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min read
Who Will Care for the Carers?
As populations age, countries will need ever more primary health workers and aides—jobs robots will never do well. So why do we treat these workers so badly?
Foreign Policy Magazine7 min readTech
Then They Came for the Lawyers
Technology has already driven blue-collar workers into the underclass. Professionals may be next.
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min read
Les Monstres Among Us
Two French best-sellers draw warnings for the present from the stories of Hitler’s henchmen.
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min read
Thank You, Jimmy Carter
WHEN THE HISTORIAN WALTER RUSSELL MEAD, in a FOREIGN POLICY article published in early 2010, sought to criticize the Obama administration and warn it against the risks of “weakness and indecision” and “incoherence and reversals,” the essay’s headline
Foreign Policy Magazine3 min read
There’s No Such Thing as a Stable Career
THE RAPID DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOMATION and artificial intelligence is dramatically changing industries—and jobs—around the world. But look back at the last century-plus of economic history, and it quickly becomes clear that such rapid technological cha
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min readSociety
The Freedom America Forgot
THE UNITED STATES has promoted human rights internationally for decades. But today, at a moment when support for authoritarian leaders who claim to speak for those left behind by globalization is spiking abroad and at home, the U.S. government must r
Foreign Policy Magazine4 min read
First They Came for the Rohingya
IN RECENT MONTHS, international media coverage of Myanmar has focused on the plight of the Rohingya people in the west of the country. And for good reason: Since August 2017, brutal army attacks on this Muslim ethnic minority have sent more than 750,
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readPolitics
The Wealth of a Nation: A History of Trade Politics in America
C. DONALD JOHNSON, OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 664 PP., $34.95, APRIL 2018 DURING THE U.S. CIVIL WAR, in the midst of one of the country’s many protectionist benders, a man named Joseph Wharton successfully lobbied for high tariffs on imported nickel.
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readPolitics
From The Editor In Chief
THIS MOMENT IN WORLD HISTORY—April 2018—may seem like an odd time for FOREIGN POLICY to devote the better part of an issue to human rights. After all, the United States is currently governed by an administration that seems less interested in protect
Foreign Policy Magazine3 min readPolitics
Zones of Noninfluence
WELL OVER A YEAR into U.S. President Donald Trump’s tenure, the State Department is in disarray. Former Secretary of State Rex Tillerson embarked on a zealous drive to reform the department as the White House proposed steep budget cuts. But what he c
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min read
Don’t Mention the War
OVER THE LAST DECADE, German filmmakers have begun churning out lavishly produced movies and television series dealing with the dark side of Germany’s recent history. The latest, most expensive, and internationally most successful example is Babylon
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