Foreign Policy Magazine2 min read
The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator
The Mosquito: A Human History of Our Deadliest Predator TIMOTHY C. WINEGARD, DUTTON, 496 PP., $28, AUGUST 2019 THE MOSQUITO, far and away mankind’s deadliest enemy, has killed half of all the people who ever lived. In his fascinating book The Mosqu
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readSociety
Why Young Koreans Love to Splurge
IN 2017, YOUNG PEOPLE AROUND THE WORLD FIRED BACK at an Australian millionaire who chided them for “spending $40 a day on smashed avocado and coffees” and still expecting to be able to buy a home. But in South Korea, a generation of frustrated young
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min readPolitics
The Dangerous Politics of Playing the Victim
The leaders of Israel and Serbia share one thing: They’ve perfected the politics of persecution. Here’s why that strategy won’t keep working.
Foreign Policy Magazine7 min read
Ever Closer Confusion
A new novel portrays the European Union’s search for meaning as a historical reckoning—and a comedy of manners.
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readPolitics
Contributors
Greg Autry is the director of the Southern California Commercial Spaceflight Initiative at the University of Southern California, vice president at the National Space Society, and chair of the International Space Development Conference. He served on
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readPolitics
China’s Overrated Technocrats
Beijing is famous for putting engineers and scientists in charge. But that doesn’t make for better leaders.
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min readSociety
Instead Of Bringing Jobs To The People, Bring The People To The Jobs
ECONOMISTS AND GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS GENERALLY THINK of poverty as a chronic, binary phenomenon: People are either poor or they are not. But reality is not so simple. Worldwide, 300 million people live nominally above the poverty line but regularly go
Foreign Policy Magazine3 min read
Pandora’s Vox
Thousands of years ago, the ancient Greeks anticipated robots and artificial intelligence—and they didn’t trust them.
Foreign Policy Magazine7 min read
Subtle Shifts
DRAMATIC PROJECTS WON’T SAVE THE WORLD. SLOW, QUIET, INCREMENTAL CHANGES ARE THE PLANET’S BEST HOPE.
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readSociety
Delhi Crime and Punishment
Netflix’s hit show documents the changes rocking Indian society—and not all of them are good.
Foreign Policy Magazine16 min read
Central Banks
IN OCTOBER 2012, THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM got its first taste of the effects of climate change when Hurricane Sandy roared through lower Manhattan, shutting down Wall Street. Amid the blackout, the power remained on in the tower containing the hea
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readPolitics
After The Caliphate: The Islamic State And The Future Of The Terrorist Diaspora
After the Caliphate: The Islamic State and the Future of the Terrorist Diaspora COLIN P. CLARKE, POLITY PRESS, 240 PP., $64.95, JUNE 2019 THIS YEAR, U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP DECLARED that the Islamic State was 100 percent defeated after U.S. and
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min read
The Botanist
PLANTS SUCK UP LOTS OF HARMFUL CARBON DIOXIDE. ONE SCIENTIST THINKS SHE CAN SUPERCHARGE THEM TO DO MUCH MORE.
Foreign Policy Magazine7 min readPolitics
The 2020 Candidates Aren’t Talking About Foreign Policy. They Need to Start.
The United States caused many of the world’s problems and can still unmake them—but only if its leaders face up to the challenge.
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min readScience
The Young
MINORS CARE MORE ABOUT FIXING THE WORLD—BUT THAT WON’T HELP UNLESS WE CHANGE THE WAY OUR DEMOCRACIES WORK.
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min read
Space Research
THE FIRST GLIMPSE HUMANITY GOT OF THE WORLD FROM ABOVE was transformative. In 1968, the U.S. astronaut William Anders returned from circling the moon in Apollo 8 with a photograph. It was a simple snapshot of the Earth, the whole Earth, rising above
Foreign Policy Magazine7 min read
Who Will Win the Self-Driving Future?
China and the United States have drastically different visions for autonomous transportation.
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min readPolitics
Our Man: Richard Holbrooke And The End Of The American Century
Our Man: Richard Holbrooke and the End of the American Century GEORGE PACKER, KNOPF, 608 PP., $30, MAY 2019 THE LATE RICHARD HOLBROOKE, the American diplomat perhaps best known for brokering the Dayton Accords that brought a truce to the Balkan war
Foreign Policy Magazine3 min read
From The Editor In Chief
WHILE IT’S NOT QUITE TRUE that espionage has always been dominated by the professionals—the dozen spies Moses sent into Canaan (as told in Numbers 13) were definitely amateurs, as were Nathan Hale and Mata Hari—it’s certainly been the case since Worl
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min read
How to Win the Rat Race
ALONG AN 18-MILE STRIP OF LAND between the Canadian province of Alberta and its neighbor Saskatchewan, the rat patrol keeps guard. An eight-person team, armed with poison and shotguns, hunts daily for any sign of the rodent invaders. The Alberta rat
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readPolitics
Spooks In The Kremlin
THREE LEATHER-BOUND FOLDERS SHAPE THE WORLD—or Vladimir Putin’s world, at least. Every morning, after his swim and workout, Russia’s president begins work by looking at these three briefing documents: The domestic Federal Security Service (FSB) gives
Foreign Policy Magazine11 min read
How to Win America’s Next War
The era of untrammeled U.S. military superiority is over. If the United States delays implementing a new approach, it risks losing a war to China or Russia—or backing down in a crisis because it fears it would—with devastating consequences for Americ
Foreign Policy Magazine16 min read
The Trump Doctrine
TWO YEARS INTO U.S. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S TENURE, there is still endemic confusion about what, exactly, his foreign policy is. Many critics blame this confusion on the president’s purported inarticulateness. Whatever one thinks of his tweets, howe
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min readPolitics
The Manufacturer’s Dilemma
To secure itself, the West needs to figure out where all its gadgets are coming from. Here’s why that’s so difficult.
Foreign Policy Magazine15 min readTech
The Spycraft Revolution
Changes in technology, politics, and business are all transforming espionage. Intelligence agencies must adapt—or risk irrelevance.
Foreign Policy Magazine3 min readTech
The Oldest Game
INDUSTRIAL ESPIONAGE is as ancient as industry itself—and a frequent accomplice to the rise of empires. From classical Greek cities to modern U.S. corporations, the theft of trade secrets has marked a transfer of power almost as routinely as bloodshe
Foreign Policy Magazine2 min read
Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster
Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster ADAM HIGGINBOTHAM, SIMON & SCHUSTER, 560 PP., $29.95, FEBRUARY 2019 IN THE LATE 1970S, at the height of the Cold War, a new city sprung up near the border of Ukraine a
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min read
Arms And The Woman
LONG BEFORE THE #METOO MOVEMENT began to spread across the world, women had started playing increasingly prominent roles in armies around the globe, from the United States to Iraqi Kurdistan. It’s no surprise, then, that the literature of war is fina
Foreign Policy Magazine5 min readPolitics
What if Israel Threw a Eurovision Party and Nobody Came?
EUROPE IS CURRENTLY STRUGGLING TO REDEFINE ITS TIES to Britain and chafing over its rapport with U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration. But the continent’s most complicated relationship may be with Israel. Many Israelis still view Europe as a
Foreign Policy Magazine6 min readPolitics
Catching China by the Belt (and Road)
WILL THE DEVELOPING WORLD FALL UNDER CHINA’S SWAY? Many policymakers in Washington certainly fear so, which is one of the reasons they have created the new International Development Finance Corp. (IDFC), which is slated to begin operating at the end
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