dulcibelle

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The Iron Wyrm Affair

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The world building in this book was fantastic - a gritty, magical yet logical, Victorian Britannia that was a joy to explore. The character development was equally as wonderful; Saintcrow's characters - Emma Bannon, Archibald Clare, and the rest - simply LEAP off the page. But, I didn't connect with those characters. I don't know why - maybe they were both a little cold and unemotional for me - but I just didn't connect. Will I read the sequel? Probably, but I won't be waiting with bated breath.
God Save the Queen

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This was an interesting take on vampires, werewolves, and goblins with a steampunk edge. I like the explanation given for how vamps, etc came to be, and there's an interesting mystery in the book as well. First of a planned trilogy, I will be looking for the sequels. However, this book does well as a stand-alone; everything wraps up nicely at the end of the book.
The Taken: Celestial Blues

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Loved, loved, LOVED this book. It's the beginning to a new trilogy by Vicki Pettersson (author of the Signs of the Zodiac series, beginning with The Scent of Shadows). It's set in Vegas and features an angel who was a noir-ish PI when alive (he died in the 1960's) and a modern reporter who lives the rockabilly life. I love the way the characters interact, and Pettersson makes each one jump off the page. But my favorite part of this book is the language. Pettersson is extremely precise in her word choice and the narrative throughout this book SINGS. I can't recommend it highly enough.
Blackout

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I don't want to say much - don't want to spoil anything for the vast multitudes who read this. But, if you haven't read Grant's Newsflesh trilogy - go, read. It's a refreshing take on zombies, and will appeal even to those who don't like zombie books. This series is really more of a political thriller - the zombies are just the vehicle that drives the story. And, for those who don't want to read a series until it is complete - Blackout finishes the series. Very highly recommended.
The Care and Feeding of Stray Vampires

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Iris Scanlon is a human who has started a concierge service for vampires. She takes care of those things that need to be done in daylight hours - and she makes sure she's no where around after dark. Until she stumbles (literally) across her newest client on his kitchen floor.I love Molly Harper. She writes wonderful paranormal romance/chick lit. She doesn't get too wrapped up in the paranormal - for the most part, her books are about folks who just happen to be vampires or werewolves or other supernatural beings. This newest offering is set in her Jane Jameson world, but introduces new characters. It's a stand alone story but it looks like Harper will be continuing to write stories set in Half Moon Hollow. I sure hope so. I like it there.
Nobody's Secret

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An entertaining YA cozy featuring a teen-aged Emily Dickinson as the sleuth. Emily meets a handsome stranger who later turns up dead in the family fish pond. She feels the authorities aren't giving the case the attention it deserves and sets out to solve the mystery. The author pays great attention to the details; vividly describing the world of Emily's time and the life she led. Each chapter starts with a snippet of Dickinson's poetry that sets the mood for that chapter. I really enjoyed this one and wouldn't mind reading more about the teen-aged Emily.
Portlandtown: A Tale of the Oregon Wyldes

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I'm not sure exactly how I feel about this one. The world building is good; Portlandtown was described in detail and was an interesting (if wet) location. Character development is also good; I loved the Wyldes (Kate, Joseph, and the twins) and the "Big Bads" truly were big and bad. But . . . it seemed like the story took a while to get started, and I just couldn't get really invested in it until the last third of the book. But that last third came on like gangbusters! If DeBorde writes more about the Wyldes, I'll probably check it out - just to see what happens.
Of Poseidon

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The start of a new YA series about mermaids (called Syrena in the book). I really enjoyed this one. Even though it's YA, there's not a lot of teen angst going on. Written in alternating POVs (Emma's is first person, present tense; Galen's is third person, present tense), it took me a bit to get comfortable with the writing - but once I did, look out! I liked getting the story from two different viewpoints, and the alternating voice made it easy to keep straight whose story I was reading. The only drawback to this story - it ends in a cliffhanger!! Highly recommended.
Postcards from Cedar Key

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I love visiting Cedar Key. It's a small Florida community filled with folks you'd love to have as your neighbor. This is the fourth book in the series, but each stands alone and the series doesn't need to be read in order. A feel-good read about down-to-earth characters, this is highly recommended to fans of Debbie Macomber and her ilk.
Queen of the Air: A True Story of Love and Tragedy at the Circus

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A somewhat interesting, but not riveting, biography of two circus performers from the early 1900's, both aerialists. Lillian Leitzel and Alfredo Codona performed with the Ringling Brothers circus at various times in their careers. Leitzel (as she was known) specialized in the Roman rings, doing as many as 100 turns on those rings twice a day. Alfredo was a trapeze artist, the only one of his time to consistantly perform a triple somersault from the bar. Both their lives ended tragically.I found the book more interesting for its information on circus life in general rather than the information on these specific performers. I just couldn't connect with either performer; I don't think I would have liked either of them "in real life".
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