audacity88_1

Reviews
More
Three

by

Philosophy in the Bedroom: Incredible that the most frank, most shocking exploration of sex and sexuality that I've ever read was written in the 18th century.
The Corrections

by

For some reason I found the first half of The Corrections absolutely enthralling and the second half a bit hard to get through. I guess I liked Chip and his arc more than any of the other family members'. Still, Franzen's portrayal of the dystopia lurking beneath the American family ideal is not likely to fade from my memory any time soon, and I'm glad if this kind of literary talent is representative of modern American writing.
Critique of Judgment

by

Not as great as its "older brother" the First Critique (the Critique of Pure Reason), but an interesting book nonetheless and one which presents the strongest imaginable rebuttal to the idea that "good taste is subjective".
Critique of Judgement

by

Not as great as its "older brother" the First Critique (the Critique of Pure Reason), but an interesting book nonetheless and one which presents the strongest imaginable rebuttal to the idea that "good taste is subjective".
Drawing of the Three

by

I'm having a hard time understanding why everybody seems to have liked this book better than the first one in the series. "Character development"? Character dissolution, I'd call it. [SPOILER WARNING:] When the druggie falls in love with the schizophrenic chick, and the weary-unto-death gunslinger can't help himself from tearing up in empathy... you start to wonder when the author decided to give in to sentimentality. First one was too sparse? Well, here King more than makes up for it here by beating us over the head with, among other overused plot devices, the incessant homophobic, racist ranting of the above-mentioned schizophrenic. Not saying King's a racist, but is it really necessary to introduce into Roland's austere quest a woman who calls white people "honkies"?
The Gunslinger

by

Unlike what I was expecting from an author with such mainstream name recognition, this is a solid sci-fi/fantasy mix, with the darker elements (in particular the cynical and world-weary protagonist) adding a refreshing spin.
The Rape of Lucrece

by

Like Lolita or Paradise Lost, a story in which we see ourselves in the villain. "Why hunt I then for colour or excuses? / All orators are dumb when beauty pleadeth", says he, rightly. Reminds us of how terrible love and lust can be. And of course the prosody is exquisite.
Dreaming in Chinese

by

I can see how this would be exciting and interesting for a multiculturalist looking to get a quick picture of modern China and its language, but for someone who's lived in China, this book comes across as a fellow naif posing as an expert and presenting her thoughts and experiences as particularly illustrative. But maybe I'm just jealous that she's the one with the book contract.
A Treatise of Human Nature

by

At first I hated Hume because he made me depressed. But what he says is right, and Kant at least gives us a way to "make the best of a bad situation" (namely the fact that everything we see is only appearances), so looking back on Hume I appreciate his honesty. Certainly an immensely important book and an essential one to read for anyone concerned with the nature of truth.
Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals

by and

Less systematic and well argued and hence more confusing than the albeit initially more difficult Critique of Practical Reason. As Kant points out in the Critique of Pure Reason, "if the size of a book were measured not by the number of its pages but by the time required to understand it [and the reasoning behind it], then we could say about many books that they would be much shorter if they were not so short." (A xix)
scribd