br77rino

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The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True

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Lots of big color pictures and graphs. I'm not sure who the target audience is.
In Fifty Years We'll All Be Chicks: . . . And Other Complaints from an Angry Middle-Aged White Guy

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Funny, funny stuff from one of the few non-liberal yet good comedians. (The only other that comes to mind is Dennis Miller.) (And P.J. O'Rourke)
The Winslow Boy

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Wonderful story about a middle-class father's defense of his boy, against the might of English institutions. (I couldn't help but picture Rebecca Pidgeon as the sister - she was perfectly cast in David Mamet's movie version.)
Separate Tables (The Rattigan Collection)

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The version I read had two pictures of the actors in character and on stage, which was nice to get a feel for things. I saw the David Niven movie, loved it, and loved this just as well. In fact, better, since it's written as two separate plays, which makes more sense. Very good.
Murder City: Ciudad Juarez and the Global Economy's New Killing Fields

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A firsthandish account of all the killings going on on the US/Mexico border in Texas because of the drug cartels.
Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power

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An excellent narrative drawn from a collection of journalists' writings in 1920's and 1930's Munich and Berlin. One gets a good sense of 'being there' by the author's effort.
The Horse, the Wheel, and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World

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Describes the various tribe-like groups in and around the Black Sea and southern Russia around 20,000 years ago.
Anabasis

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"The March Up Country," translated by Rouse. A surprisingly short book, of seven chapters ("books") and about 200 pages, and a surprisingly easy read. Xenophon wrote the book in the third person, of his joining a friend to meet Cyrus, the Persian prince, who was in Asia Minor. He is then convinced to join Cyrus and the friend on an expedition to combat an enemy there in Asia Minor, but Cyrus has lied and it is really an expedition to overthrown the Persian king, Cyrus' brother, Artaxerxes. We meet all sorts of peoples along the way. It is very interesting and a bit shocking to hear the Greeks speak of "the natives" of Asia Minor in the same way that the colonial Spaniards spoke of the natives of America, or the Brits of the natives in India and Africa. Xenophon becomes an important commander of the expedition, though he is not a soldier at the beginning of the tale - just a well-off Greek looking for adventure.It is very eye-opening and gives clear view of the culture of that long ago time in the dawn of empires, one that should be required reading in high school given its amazing historical value and easy readability. Why read "secondary" materials when you can read this!
The Day of the Triffids

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Triffids are walking plants, with a terrible sting. Britain is being invaded by them.
Rebelion en la granja

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An allegory using farm animals as a society experimenting with socialism, and realizing too late the mistake they have made in accepting it.
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