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La tierra de las cuevas pintadas: Sexto volumen de la saga LOS HIJOS DE LA TIERRA®. Bienvenidos a la Era Auel. Un fenómeno literario internacional.

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I was very disappointed in this book. It needed a good edit as there was much repetition and some places where the writing just didn't make sense. I don't remember the previous books in the series being poorly written as this one was. I have been following the series since I was a teenager and have enjoyed all of them, but I think the relationships and the characters that made the other books in the series interesting were not very present in this book until the last 200 pages. After finishing this one, I am now wondering if there will be another book in the series. Surely we are going to come back around to Ayla finding her Clan son after all these years. She did have the dream in painted caves about her sons meeting, right? If this is the final book in the series, it just doesn't feel done to me.
The Twelve

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I think Justin Cronin's writing is superb. The details make the story and people very real and every character has a backstory which motivates their actions and makes them interesting to read about. At the end of The Passage I wanted to spend more time with Peter and Amy. I couldn't wait for this book and I was not disappointed. The story and characters are complex and difficult, which makes it a challenging but rewarding read. And so many questions still to answer. Where is Amy? What about Alicia? Will she turn dark after what happened to her in this story or will it just motivate her more? The next book cannot get here soon enough for me.
Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

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Louis Zamperini is an amazing, hopeful, positive person. To have lived through everything described in this book and to still have such an amazing spirit is inspirational. Laura Hillenbrand does an excellent job writing non-fiction in an engaging almost fictional style, so that you are engaged and want to keep on reading. An excellent read!
Moon Over Manifest

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This is a very sweet book about small-town Kansas and a little girl trying to figure out her father. Abilene comes to Manifest, Kansas on a train in 1936, sent by her father. Abilene has many questions about her father and why he sent her to Manifest. As she begins to learn the story of Manifest and its residents, Abilene tries to find the story of her father. Miss Sadie's story of Ned and Jinx from 1918 begins to reveal the history of Manifest and the past that many residents have forgotten. Being from Kansas and feeling like I know what small town is like, I enjoyed this story. I've been under that hot Kansas sun in the summer. I also thought the story incorporated a lot of historical fact in the story well, including Kansas' immigrant history and the influenza epidemic of 1918. The writing was good and the story was well constructed to interweave all the parts. If you would like to take a trip back to Kansas in the Depression era and WWI (1918), this is a good book. I would recommend it to 3rd through 5th graders primarily, but to anyone who grew up in small-town Kansas.
Fahrenheit 451

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I can't believe I've gotten to be my age (not disclosing that here) and hadn't read Fahrenheit 451. Everybody who believes in an educated democracy must read this book. Everyone must covet their books. It is so important that everyone have access to information.
Djevojka koja se igrala vatrom

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One word to describe this book is unpredictable. Just when you think you know where it's going, wham! something happens and the narrative takes a sharp right turn. It is The Road meets I Am Legend. Medical experimentation gone bad and a resulting apocalyptic outcome. Cronin spends a lot of time developing characters and it pays off. When I was finished reading, for two days I longed to go back and read more about Peter and Alicia and Amy and everyone. I really hope there is a sequel because there are still a lot of unanswered questions.
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter: Vampire Hunter

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If you would like to have your ideas of history and particularly Abraham Lincoln twisted a bit, you should read this book. The premise of the story is that vampires do exist and they have been the driving force behind many significant historical events. They are even the motivation for Abraham as he seeks revenge for the untimely death of his mother. It does sound funny and kind of corny, but really Grahame-Smith has done a good job of not being too over-the-top and riding the edge of believability so that it all sounds plausible. Again, an interesting fun twist on history.
Mockingjay

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I was dispapointed. Everytime the action start to get going, Katniss is removed from the situation and the reader doesn't get to participate. One of the strong features of The Hunger Games and even Catching Fire was the action and there was less in Mockingjay. I was also frustrated with Katniss' lack of understanding about her situation and the influence she had. She never really seemed to grow as a character. And in the end, I think she chose the right guy for her, but it wouldn't have been my choice.
Okay for Now

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I really liked this book. Everything in the end seemed to work out a little too easily, but I still liked it. It was fun to revisit/learn more about Doug Swieteck, a character from Gary Schmidt's Wednesday Wars. I really liked the humor and the way phrases and descriptions would be used again.
Midnight Rising: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War

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Despite being a Kansas native, I didn't know much about John Brown. I really enjoyed learning more about that aspect of Kansas' history and the infamous character John Brown. The story is full of details about Brown's life and his passion for abolitionism. I didn't realize that John Brown's activity in Kansas encompassed a relatively short period of time. His most dramatic plan was to take Harper's Ferry and then march into Virginia and free the slaves. And while his plan was not successful in the way that he intended, it ultimately was successful in bringing the issue of slavery to the forefront and once the issue was exposed it couldn't be put back in the box. I think Brown deserves some credit for being the "spark" that started the Civil War.
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