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What Janie Found

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Janie has found evidence that Hannah (her kidnapper from 13ish years ago, and daughter of Janie's not-real parents who raised her under false pretenses, is receiving money from her not-real father four times a year. However, Janie's parents have both sword before law-enforcement officials on many occasions that they have no knowledge of Hannah's whereabouts. They have decided to let her stay lost so as not to dig up their painful past yet again. Armed with her new information, Janie convinces her real brother from her biological family and her ex-boyfriend to go with her to Boulder Colorado and visit Janie's other biological brother in college, under false pretenses. Because Boulder, Colorado is also where Janie's not-real father sends those checks...
Every You, Every Me

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David Levithan utilizes strike through to establish a doubtful narrator. The concept of how well you really know someone was interesting to find in a young adult novel. I also liked having the mystery surrounding the photographs instead of trying to tell the story through them.
The Great Gatsby

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A Classic, a fast read...prepare for the new film, kids!
All Unquiet Things

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I had a hard time with the alternating points of view. There was times I would be reading, and I would forget if I was reading from Audrey's or Neily's point of view. The mystery of the plot is one to keep you guessing until the last moment. The story is about how keeping secrets leads to terrible events.
Nerd Do Well

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Strange and brilliant! The narrative jumps, but its voice is strong. Great for introspective older teens and adults, alike.
Kiki Strike: Inside the Shadow City

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 This spy novel written for girls was excellent. I read it on the recommendation of a patron, and I wasn't disappointed. The "irregulars" are strong girls in their own right. I would recommend this to readers of mystery young adult novels or just girls interested in strong lead characters.
Born Standing Up: A Comic's Life

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Steve Martin's writing is thoughtful and witty. Young people could learn a lot about work ethic, talent and growth from this lovely memoir.
Boy Meets Boy

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This book is kind of fantastical with the open acceptance of homosexuality. There is fun tempered with heartache and confusion, which is found in any relationship. This would be recommended for teens who are having trouble being accepted and just want kind of a fun read that is definitely idealistic.
Easy

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This is a contemporary romance but deals tactfully with some heavy hitting issues such as date rape. It would be a good companion to "Speak" or "Inexcusable". Definitely for a mature, older teen. It is labeled as adult fiction but easily conforms for YA or new adult.
An Ideal Husband

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I think this play is a fantastic example of Oscar Wilde's writing. Even though it deals with the idea of marriage, I think it would be good for a literature class read, to talk about corruption, ideals, expectations, etc. This play is funny, and really well done.
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