pier50

Reviews
More
The Art of Fielding: A Novel

by

As a Brit, I know nothing about baseball other than it is like rounders played by bigger men who chew tobacco and spit alot! However, this novel held my attention and I learnt a fair bit about the game and the training that goes into making a good player.The characters are well drawn, although I didn't find myself warming to the main character Henry who is somewhat monosylibic and does not seem to have a ny redeeming traits. It is a longish book, but never felt too long. As some other reviewers have mentioned, there are one or two odd plot moments, including the ending, but overall, a good enjoyable read
Charlotte Gray

by

Having enjoyed Birdsong i was looking forward to the second part of Sebastian Faulks French trilogy. Unfortunately, i found the first 300 pages of the book rather slow going as Charlotte Gray pottered round France moping about her lost airman. Only in the last 3rd of the book did anything much happen. As ever, Faulks writing is excellent, but the story just did not really take off.
The Scarecrow

by

A good Michael Connelly novel, although the Jack McEvoy character is not as well defined as Harry Bosch, Connelly's main hero. One of the problems with the plot is that you no who the Scarecrow is fairly early on, so the story is more about trying to catch him than a whodunit mystery
The Drop

by

Another really good Harry Bosch thriller. Bosch's past boss - Irvin Irving specifically asks for Harry to look at a case of suspected suicde, of Irving's own son. This brings Bosch into direct conflict with his nemisis. A seperate cold case is also being investigated and the book finishes with a good twist in the tale
The Lifeboat: A Novel

by

A lifeboat full of people, cast adrift provides the background for an interesting story about survival and what lengths people will go to to save themselves. The book is well written, in the tone of the age (1914) and skips along quite well. It is perhaps difficult to feel much sympathy with main character Grace, as she comes over as rather cold and calculating
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry: A Novel

by

Beautifully written, this gentle book takes us on both an emotional and physical journey through the spine of England, finishing in Berwick upon Tweed. The ending is by turns sad, funny and life affirming.
The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris

by

An enjoyable ramble through literary Paris, The title is a little misleading as it is part memoir, part history and wanders around somewhat. The Most Beautiful Walk... is not actually mapped out or shown, but is more of a personal reflection of the streets and alleyways of Paris. A nice distraction that can be put down and picked up quite easily without losing any thread.
Dead Like You

by

Another crime thriller in the Roy Grace series. A rather nasty tale of rape and murder overlaid by the ongoing personal developments in Grace's life and that of his colleagues. There are one or two parts of the story which are left open which one assumes will form the basis of some later books in the Grace series.
Boomsday

by

Really enjoyed this satirical run through American politics. The characters are well drawn and plot moves at a good pace. I do agree with a previous reviewer though, that the ending seemed a little rushed. A good funny read though.
Reversal

by

Another good Michael Connelly thriller, this time featuring both Mickey Haller (The Lincoln Lawyer) and Harry Bosch. Not quite as exciting as the Bosch series of books, but it flows along very nicely and the interaction between Bosch and Haller is shaping up nicely!
scribd