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The Whiskey Rebels

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This is the first book that I have read by David Liss. Although I do own a copy of A Conspiracy of Paper I have not yet had a chance to read it. I did not request this book because of the author but because of the time frame involved (post Revolution years). I was amazed at what I was reading. The book centers on two main characters whose stories are told in alternating chapters. One of the main characters, Ethan Saunders, is a disgraced Revolutionary war hero who falls into a mystery that he cannot help but become a part of. As the book goes on Ethan finds that the mystery has nation wide implications. The second main character, Joan Maycott, is a simple woman who has everything she cares about wrenched from her and vows revenge. With each chapter the lives of these two characters become more intertwined.The Whiskey Rebels is a good read from start to finish and at times I had a hard time putting it down. The main characters are both so absorbing that you really don't know who to cheer for. Even the more minor characters are well developed in this book. I was almost sad when I finished the book because I wanted there to be more.Time for me to start reading more David Liss books.
Witnesses of War: Children's Lives Under the Nazis

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This was a very interesting book that focuses on the children of WWII. Very rarely does a book come out that focuses on the lives of the children. Not only that, but this book deals with all of the children whether they be Polish, Jewish, Russian or German. The author also utilizes excerpts from the children's own writings that had been preserved and drawings that the children made during the war. Even though the author gets sidetracked at times I would still recommend this read.
The Charlemagne Pursuit: A Novel

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I am a huge fan of Steve Berry's. That being said I had a hard time reading The Charlemagne Pursuit. It did not draw me in like the others did and at about half of the way through it started to become a chore to read this one. Steve Berry has some wonderful books to his credit but this is not one of them.
The Third Secret

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I probably could have recommended this book until I read the end. Berry uses this book as an indictment of the Catholic church and their policies. Berry does a better job of writing than Dan Brown does, and he does his homework. I just wish that he would stick to historical (non religious) topics and not the church. I enjoyed the Romanov Prophesy more..
Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

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I was unsure of what this book would be like when I picked it up and I was hesitant to buy it. That being said I am glad that I did. This book is the book that Christopher wanted to write, so it's from the perspective of a 15 year old autistic boy. If one is familiar with autism then this book makes all of the sense in the world. If unfamiliar, then this book may seem a bit disjointed at times, but that's just the way that his mind works. Nonetheless it is a very sad and cute story. The author did a great job of giving us those little quirks and special abilities that one would see in a high functioning (Asperger's) autistic child. Christopher loves Sherlock Holmes, animals, and his "maths" were he is very gifted, he can make and follow maps in his head. He is not very emotionally attached to people, hates the colors yellow and brown, and has many other dislikes including liars. Another great touch from the author was to number the chapters according to prime numbers. This book was unexpectedly good.
In Harm's Way: The Sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis and the Extraordinary Story of Its Survivors

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I absolutely loved this book. It centers on the U.S.S. Indianapolis and it's sinking during WWII.For those unfamiliar, the U.S.S. Indianapolis was the ship that carried "little boy" to where it would be assembled. This ship was sunk by a Japanese sub. While some of the men died instantly many were left in shark infested waters for days. Just over 300 (out of over 1,000) survived.Stanton does a good job of making you really feel what the men were going through without being too wordy. He also attacks the beaurucratic red tape that led to these men being left out in the waters for that long.
Museum of Human Beings

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This book had a lot of promise and I went into it with a gusto. I was disappointed that I was not able to get into the characters, they lacked depth. I appreciated the story but was looking for more and this book did not give it to me.
Sister Carrie

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Carrie is a country girl in the late 1800's who decides to move to Chicago. From the beginning Carrie is unhappy with the realization of how hard she will have to work just to get by, so she decides to let herself become a kept woman, all of the while dreaming of having nice things and pretty clothes. When she tires of one man she ends up taking off with his best friend. We are able to see the decline of the second man, both in stature and mentally, as we see Carrie rise to prominence and fame. At the end the only person to remain unscathed was the person who Carrie left.This book was a bit stiff at times, and the characters weren't developed as fully as they could have been, but it was a pretty ok read.
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

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I have tried reading this book before and never finished it. I thought that I would sit down, read, and not pick up another book until I finished this one. I now understand why I couldn't finish it the first time.This book was by no means a bad book, in fact it is a wonderful book. The writing was pretty good and the story itself was pretty awesome. I am sure that if I had been able to read it in 1870 or even 1900 then it would have been a mind blower. Unfortunately I have not yet finished constructing my time machine, so here I am in 2007 reading it. What detracted from the story for me was the amount of description.. mainly because I have seen subs, I have seen what lays under the sea, and nothing is new to me (well that's not entirely true). It is quite remarkable that in the time that it was written that Verne would have so much insight though... truly remarkable.
Le portrait de Dorian Gray

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I loved this book and all of the characters in it. I couldn't help but being both disgusted and intrigued by Dorian Gray. By the time the book was finished I was quite saddened to have it be over.
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