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The Water Witch

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I hadn't realized when I won this book it was 2nd in a trilogy (observant, I was not), so I got the first one to get started. I really liked this book. It's very light and quick reading, and the characters are compelling enough to continue to want to know what happens. Supernatural fiction with just enough fey, danger, suspense, and sexiness without being tawdry to keep you turning pages until the very end. My only possible concern is that the books are rather formulaic and a wee bit predictable. But that didn't stop the enjoyment for me!
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Matchbox Girls

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While there were always a few out there, I have begun to notice an uptick in Angel/Nephilim fiction the past couple of years, whether on TV or in print. I'm not a huge fan, but I did find I enjoyed this book.Main character Marley finds herself abruptly the guardian of two extraordinary 4 year olds when their uncle disappears. In their search for the uncle, Marley and the girls bump into a cast of good, bad and neutral celestial beings and learn more of who they are and how multifaceted the world is. I found the characters pretty believable, especially the 4 year olds. They were a nice mix of startling wisdom mixed with simplistic viewpoint and little kid emotions that you see in average little kids (never mind "special ones!). I would be interested to see where this series is going.
Zombie Island: A Shakespeare Undead Novel

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I thought this book had a lot of potential - Shakespeare as a vampire! Zombies! What's not to like? Alas, I found I enjoyed this book about as much as Pride, Prejudice and Zombies, which is to say not much. While I can appreciate that is how Shakespeare would talk, the mix of current sentence structure and vocabulary and Shakesperean structure and such a bit uncomfortable (pick one or the other already!) I found it a bit of a slog through it read, which was extremely disappointing. Had I read the first in the series, perhaps I would have enjoyed it more, but I just couldn't seem to like this one....
Beyond Delicious: The Ghost Whisperer's Cookbook: More than 100 Recipes from the Dearly Departed

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As I collect ghost stories/hauntings books, I had to have this one. The idea of those "beyond the veil" still trying to pass on cooking advice tickled me a bit.I find I like the stories a bit better than the recipes, which are presented with the flavor of a church ladies cookbook (a friend recognized a few of them as coming off the packages of some of the ingredients!) But, then, who doesn't like to take credit for a favorite recipe, rather than saying "oh, I just follow the instructions on the NoneSuch box!" I guess I was looking for a bit more..... something. I agree with the review that described the stories as a bit "mediocre." But it's still a fun book, I thought.
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Hex Appeal

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With Anthologies, I have a tendency to like 1, maybe 2 of the stories, which I bought for typically for one of the authors. This one I actually liked almost ALL of the stories, particularly the Jim Butcher and Carrie Vaughn ones. But all of them were really good. Excellent tidbits of Urban Fantasy!
Switched

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I was intrigued by the idea of a book dealing with Changelings, and did ultimately end up enjoying the book. That said, I had a hard time liking a lot of the characters, finding their attitudes hard to justify, finding "trolls" that look just like humans disappointing, and the base greed driving the "changeling program" a bit crass. I have to agree with the opinion that the heroine is a bit of a brat, as well as an airhead. All of that said, I'm not the target audience, so..... I suspect younger teens would think this was right up their alley. Adults are confusing and autocratic, wanting independence while not being completely cut loose, and wanting to be "special" are all themes that would appeal to a much younger crowd than I!
Psycho USA: Famous American Killers You Never Heard Of

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I found myself enjoying this book more than I thought I would. The author gives a highly "readable" account of each killer, without being weighed down by heavy, technical language or psychoanalysis. I liked that parallels are drawn between some of these killers and their contemporaries, and there is some indication of possible/probable motivation in each case.This is not a book for the hard-core enthusiast. And the title is a bit of a misnomer - not all of these folks struck me as "psycho." Some seemed sad, hopeless, and deluded rather than mentally deranged.
Tea Party Patriots: The Second American Revolution

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I'm not sure what I was expecting, but unless a) you are deeply interested in the tea party, and b) looking for a textbook to read, this wasn't really it. It's interesting, but a bit of a snoozer, which is too bad considering the folks writing the book have some great core ideas and ideals that have gotten muddied in the popular media. All aspects of the Tea Party philosophy are covered well....it's just very dry, and somewhat pedantic.
The Smart Woman's Guide to Diabetes

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While engaging and insightful, it wasn't exactly what I was looking for. The author was born with Type A diabetes, which isn't the insight I was looking for, being pre-diabetic. BUT she does give good advice on watching what you eat, etc.
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