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Sacre Bleu: A Comedy d'Art

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Christopher Moore's latest. It didn't make me laugh beverages out my nose as hard as his previous works. I think that might be partially due to the fact that I read this one, as opposed to listening to it on audiobook, which I've done with most of his other books. I just seem to find them more funny when they are read to me. Aside from that, I found the characters to be interesting and really enjoyed how actual paintings were provided to help advance the story and provide a visual. I didn't find this one as gripping as "Dirty Job" or "Bite Me", but would still recommend to other Christopher Moore fans.
Dirk Danger Loves Life

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I picked up "Dirk Danger Loves Life" by Chris Rothe expecting a really humorous book, something along the lines of Christopher Moore or Rob Kroese. While their are some truly hilarious moments in DDLL, I was not expecting how moving and sad other parts of the novel would be. Chris Rothe does a fantastic job of creating characters and situations with which the reader can empathize. There is just the right amount of mystery surrounding the titular character, without giving it all away. The story progresses well, Dirk's protege learns a new lesson about every chapter or so, and a little more about Dirk is revealed each time as well. This episodic feel is great for the casual reader, although I read this book very quickly because I had a hard time putting it down. I very much wanted to know what trial Dirk would put the (unnamed) protagonist through next. I strongly recommend DDLL for anyone who appreciates a character-driven story which has both hilarious and incredibly sad and poignant moments as well.
GRANDPA HATES THE BIRD: Six Short Stories of Exciting, Hilarious and Possibly Deadly Adventure

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A very cute and humorous collection of short stories told from the point of view of Bird, the beloved (and hated) pet. This would make a fantastic read-aloud book, the stories vary in length, but would be really well suited to being read over several days. The characters are loveable, and there is just the right amount of tension in the stories to make the reader/listener worry about Bird, but he always ends up triumphing in the end over adversity (or over Grandpa!).
How To Slay a Dragon

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A cute children's story that flips traditional quest story archetypes to create a hilarious, inventive adventure. A great read for kids in late elementary/ early jr.high, or adults who just like a fun book. A little slow-moving in parts, but generally a humorous, charming story.
Hot Ticket (Ticket Trilogy #1)

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"Hot Tickets make school less boring." Tote agree!Marchini's "Hot Ticket" is a YA mystery set in a junior high school, with the major question being who is handing out the coveted "hot tickets", orange paper slips which bring popularity as they are collected. But when sixth-grader Juliet realizes she is the only kid in her grade without a ticket, she becomes single-mindedly determined to discover who is behind it all.A very readable story, overall. I loved the descriptions of the characters behaviours and found them to be very relatable and interesting. The plot is believable, and the story moves along at a steady pace. I'm curious to see how Marchini continues the series though, as the mystery appears to be solved at the conclusion of the story. However, I am intersted in reading more about the adventures of Juliet and her friends!
A Subtle Thing

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I received this book as part of Librarything's Early Reviewers program.I've been reading a lot of books about depression lately, trying to understand it from the inside out. "A Subtle Thing" by Alicia Hendley is the first work of fiction that I've read on the subject. I found the book very gripping at first. The initial few chapters have a very traumatic and foreboding feel to them, so I assumed that I was going to be in for a serious, tear-jerker type of book. But there are a few things that kept bothering me about this work. The first is that the perspective of Beth (the protagonist), is just too clear. She's very clinical in her understanding and in her expression, it just doesn't feel like someone who is in the darkest part of depression. Her symptoms are discussed a great deal, but her feelings are just not very well described at times. Another thing that bothered me a bit is the time jumps. So much time is spent in the first time period at the beginning of the work that I thought it was going to be quite a linear read. Instead it jumps around quite a bit, but I didn't feel that this was particularly helpful to the plot or aided in advancing the story. This is one of those books that just is. It doesn't really have a plot, and seemingly ends at a random point. Overall, this one didn't wow me too much. It was a satisfactory read but doesn't leave much to resonate or remember once it's done.
Don't Be a Hero: A Superhero Novel

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I received this book as a Member Giveaway. A dark superhero crime novel, Chris Strange's "Don't be a Hero" explores a world where superheroes exist, but only grudgingly. Former heroes Spook and the Carpenter get by as under-the-table private investigators, until they are hired to solve a kidnapping. But the job unravels when the duo discover the kidnapper is a super-villain with a diabolical plan to bring super-humans (metas) back to the attention of a distrusting and disinterested society.Strange does a good job of creating an interesting, reality-based universe, which is quite challenging in a genre that is so popular and widely explored. While some characters and actions seem familiar (eg- absorbing powers from brain matter a la Syler from Heroes), most characters and scenarios are fairly original. The level of violence is a bit more than I usually like, but it does give the novel a very gritty, noir kind of feel.Overall, I would recommend "Don't Be a Hero" for anyone who enjoys a good crime novel and/or the superhero genre. It's an exciting read that I simply couldn't put down until it was done.
Tritcheon Hash

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I don't know what it is about Tricheton Hash, but I just could not get into it. I'm willing to admit that I never finished it, I got about four chapters in and it just wasn't working for me. While the premise really appealed and seemed interesting, the story just didn't seem to pull me in. The writing style and Trich's character just seemed so flat.
Twenty Years After

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While this excellent book may not need another review, I feel that I have to say I enjoyed this one even more than "The Three Musketeers". I was thrilled to see Athos, Aramis, Porthos and D'Artagnan reunited, albeit much older and wiser, to embark on another grand adventure. And this one even had explosions!If you have read "The Three Musketeers", do not hestiate to pick up "Twenty Years After", it is certainly worth a read!And reading Dumas taught me some new words, like 'anthropophagi'. :)
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