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Little Princes: One Man’s Promise to Bring Home the Lost Children of Nepal

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Little Princes begins with a self centered decision by Connor Grennan to volunteer at a Nepalese orphanage, and continues through his experiences with the children, often funny, to his efforts to reunite children with their families. The book highlights the plight of Nepalese children, not orphans, but victims of child trafficking during Nepal’s civil war. Amidst poverty, ignorance and civil war, Nepalese parents paid money on the promise that their children would be educated and would have a better life. Mr. Grennan’s determination to reunite trafficked children with their parents sparked the creation of Next Generation Nepal, a non-profit and the beneficiary of proceeds of the book. The story of the children and their parents is compelling; Mr. Grennan’s story much less so. Overall, the book is well worth reading.
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Bad Boy

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Bad Boy, nineteenth in the Inspector Banks series is the first I’ve read. Overall, I found the book tedious. The character lacked depth and the plot was uninteresting. I won’t be keeping it.
And Only to Deceive

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And Only to Deceive by Tasha Alexander, a Victorian mystery is neither the best nor the worst such that I’ve read. I thought the mystery obvious and the tendency of the author to directly address the reader annoying. Unfortunately because I found the mystery obvious, reading how Lady Emily finally discovers the truth in the last one-third of the book was tedious. Despite the drawbacks, I did read the book with enough enjoyment to consider the second book in the series, particularly since the good review of the second book was the basis for reading the first.
Freethinkers: A History of American Secularism

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‘Freethinkers’ provides an interesting history, one not often covered by history books, from an interesting perspective. The book presents the role of secularists in shaping the framework and the laws of the U.S. and in safeguarding the rights of its citizens; and necessarily also presents a less than flattering role of the religious and religious organizations in the same. The author appears to have extensively researched the subject and has presented those facts that support her thesis. While not unbiased, the book is nonetheless a persuasive argument for separation of state and religion that reminds readers why the U.S. has a “godless” constitution.
A Poisoned Season

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I enjoyed 'A Poisoned Season' much more than the first in the series. The mystery, subplots, characters all seemed more interesting, better developed, however, sometimes the writing seemed 'flat' though less so in this book than the first.
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