kaipakartik_1

Reviews
More
The Legend of Pradeep Mathew: A Novel

by

Enjoyed this book a lot. Hilarious and an unusually melancholic look at cricket. Its filled with booze, loose women and a lot of great insights into the game that make cricket what it is.
Railsea

by

The story is about Sham Al Soorap a young apprentice on a train which hunts Moles. Its the future, the sky is poisoned. So is a lot of the land. The only way to travel is over the sea of rails crisscrossing each other. The rails themselves have been built before. No one knows how they came to be. Mythologies and deities abound.On the railsea there are moles, not your ordinary moles but giant ones who are hunted. A lot of captains have particular targets referred to as philosophies. Sham is on a doctor's apprentice on one of those trains. There are other threads to the tale but that would be giving too much away.The Railsea itself is described beautifully in sparse prose with well chosen words.The book has a lot of substance. It doesn't have any romance that stifles the storytelling as in most novels. The moles themselves are beautifully done. Mieville excels in describing the hunt, putting you in the scene and his omniscient narrator is a delight.All in all its a great story and one of the better reads of the year.China Mieville is inventive as usual. Its a great book but for some reason I didn't enjoy this as much as the rest of his ouvre. High expectations tend to that though and I had tremendous ones from Railsea.
A Feast for Crows: A Song of Ice and Fire: Book Four

by

A horribly turgid read. A terrible let down after the terrific storm of swords.
The Prestige

by

Both the book and movie are sheer genius and I guess it depends on what you experience first. The subtle changes in perception are fantastic. Events which were thought to be one way become something else.Part of the joy in reading this novel is how Priest ties everything together and how the tale comes together from the different narratives. All of Priest's usual suspects are here. Dopplegangers, unreliable narrators and the works. I enjoyed both the film and novel.
Fahrenheit 451

by

Read this after Bradbury's death. Good in places not so much in others. More novella than a novel. Didn't affect me the way I thought it would seeing as the subject matter involved the burning of books, objects which I cherish greatly.
Number9Dream

by

This is the tale of Eiji Miyake who wants to find his father. He travels to Tokyo from his village to do so.Its not a straight out quest though. He encounters the Yakuza along the way. Dream sequences and Video games abound. There are death sequences so horrific that the line between the surreal and real begins to blur. David Mitchell is a pure storyteller. He creates suspense and keeps you reading. This is especially true when he goes into flashback mode. His ramblings are even better and he probably knows Japan as well as anyone with its unpredictable earthquakes and confined spaces along with the food.There were a ton of John Lennon references that I didn't care for but that is a small gripe in an otherwise outstanding novel. Cloud Atlas is probably the probably the first book you should pick by David Mitchell though.
Angelmaker

by

Nick Harkaway can write.(Understatement) The prose is top notch. The characters are brilliant.There is Joe Spork, good son of gangster who turns bad. Edie Banister was a world war two spy but is now an octogenarian and it is her world war adventures that are narrated with the verve and panache.The detail and passion Nick Harkaway has for these steampunkish machines just shines through. There are passages of such brilliance describing a mundane detail that you wonder how he managed to put so much life into the object.The trailer should tell you all about the plot.Its just a brilliant read full of inventive wit.
Deathless

by

Dazzling in places but near the end I just got tired of it. The first 200 pages were a gorgeous read. Absolutely spellbinding and amazing which I why I am rating it 3.5 despite not being able to finish the book.I might come back someday to the end and wrap things up.This is mostly the tale of Koschei the deathless told through Marya's eyes and the prose is brilliant.Catherynne Valente is as fine a writer that you are going to read in your life.
Midnight Riot

by

Extremely dry. Was tremendously excited but turned out to be a terrible let down in the end.Might be my fault though. Not very familiar with London but it just seemed very tedious to read.I stopped 50 pages before the end. I might get around to finishing it later.
scribd