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God's Blueprint for Bible Prophecy: Daniel

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This is a companion book to the more detailed inductive study on Daniel published by Kay Arther and the Precept ministries. It is easy to read, but gives a lot of detailed instructions on how to study Daniel. The inductive approach has you break down each chapter by key words and themes and see what pattern emerges. I recommend this for people starting out a study of the book of Daniel. The full workbook is best for a more detailed study.
The Cat Who Went to Heaven

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A 1931 Newberry Award winner and well deserving of it. The book describes and poor artist in Japan who adopts a very well mannered cat--who turns out to be very lucky. The cat prays before the statue of Buddha--and the artist is visited by the Buddhist priest to perform a commision--at painting of Buddha at his death. The book describes how the artist reviewed the life of Buddha and paints the animals who came to visit Buddha--with the cat last. A surprise twist at the end completes the story.
Etiquette & Espionage

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[[Ettiquette & Espionage]]: Another humorous and successful book by [[Gail Carriger]] Set in the same alternate history universe as her Parasol Protectorate Series, it is written in a similar vein, with vampires, werewolves, and steampunk contraptions contending for the reader's attention. Ostensibly set in 1852 in a girls finishing school, this is no 1852 that we know. Rather it is a world of schools floating by means of dirigibles as large as ships, espionage conducted by vampires, as well as nubile young ladies who are taught to throw knives as well as curtsey.Along with rolicking bon mots, the story is supported by a fast paced narrative and captivating characters like the 14 year old lead Sophronia and her friend Dimity. Please try at least one of Gail Carriger's books!
At Home: A Short History of Private Life

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Bill Bryson's "At Home" is a highly entertaining stroll through the history of the home. He shows the history behind each of the rooms in his 1851 English home. He covers the spice trade, slavery (The Kitchen), men and women's fashions (The Dressing Room), health, medicine, and sex, (The Bedroom), as well as English architecture (The Garden). And that only scratches the surface. Prepare to enjoy this book, even if you hate history. It is a series of highly entertaining stories about interesting people, places, and things that made our houses what they are today.
Redescubrimiento del Espíritu: Conéctate al poder del Espíritu Santo

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[Spirit Rising] by [[Jim Cymbala]]Once again Pastor Jim Cymbala of the Brooklyn Tabernacle writes a gripping and helpful book, this time about the Holy Spirit. He gives many examples of how the Spirit teaches, leads, guides, heals, and delivers from members of his multi-national, multi-racial congregation in Brooklyn. He shows how the early Church in the book of Acts was led by the Spirit to send Paul and Barnabas into the mission field, how the Spirit directed Annias of Damascus to anoint the persecutor Saul and heal him of blindness, how the Christians prayed in the Spirit and the earth shook in response, and Peter was delivered from prison. Then he asks the tough questions: Why aren't churches bearing this fruit today? Why aren't we asking for the Spirit's guidance in every decision, even in the Church services?I highly recommend this book for everyone who wishes to work with God's Holy Spirit to do His work.
Outcast of Redwall

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[Outcast of Redwall] is another well plotted story from Redwall world of [[Brian Jacques]]. I like how he ties this story back to earlier ones, providing generational history of badgers and mice. Highly entertaining reading, with distinctive personalities for moles, shrews, ferrets, foxes, mice, hedgehogs, and badgers. Aside from his characterization and plotting, Mr. Jacques provides amusing descriptions of the various foods the anthropomorphic animals eat. He also creates a variety of songs and poems for his characters to sing and recite. This book is enjoyable for all ages.
The Finer Points of Sausage Dogs

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Once more, [Alexander McCall Smith], author of the No 1 Ladies' Detective series, tickles my funny bone in another series involving Professor Dr. Igelfeld, master philologist of mideval romance languages, noted for his seminal work, "Portuguese Irregular Verbs". In this book, [[The Finer Points of Sausage Dogs]], Dr Igelfeld is pressed into service as an emergency vetinary surgeon, a courier for Father Christmas' bones, and as an entertaining lecturer on a cruise ship. Just when you think the ridiculous meets the sublime, the sublime become ridiculous.
Portuguese Irregular Verbs

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[Portuguese Irregular Verbs] by [[Alexander McCall Smith]], author of the [No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency] series, is another wonderful addition to the humorous fiction genre. Professor Dr. von Igelfeld is a very smart, very specialized (witness his 1200 page magnum opus "Portuguese Irregular Verbs"), and very naive professor. He and his professor friends get into humuous contretemps dealing with the real world as well as the perils of academe. The pacing and understated writing style is similar to [No 1 Ladies' Detective Agency], but the characters are more unbelievable and fantastic. My wife felt it was too silly. I loved it. Your mileage may vary.
Taggerung

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[Taggerung] is another great addition to the Redwall chronicles. [[Brian Jacques]] does a good job creating a new wrinkle--a kidnapped otter babe becomes the destined head of vermin: the Taggerung. How he grows up, what happens then and afterward makes the interesting substance of the book. Add in a colorful hare, adventerous mouse, delicious food and a book long mystery about who the next abbess will be, and you have one of Mr. Jacques' better works.
Thimble Summer

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A Newberry Award winner from 1939 that well captures rural America of the '30s--both the hard times and the good times.The story covers the summer of a 9 year old girl, Garnet, who finds a silver thimble during a drought and then whose luck changes, with the drought breaking that night. Garnet has a series of amusing adventures while performing normal farm work: threshing, baking lime for construction, traveling to the country fair.I was struck by the great innocence of the time: Garnet hitchhikes 18 miles to a town and back with no danger and no worry. The books is well worth reading for kids of any age.
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