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Man Overboard!

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I really enjoyed reading this book! I am a fan of pulp fiction and I would definitely place this book in that category. I like it even more so because this is a Canadian adventure. If I still had my sons at home I would be buying up more from this author for their reading pleasure. The story was crisp, engaging from the very beginning and ended very well. It is written in the very spirit of a pulp fiction tale with not a lot of character development or scenery description to bog the story down and lose the attention of the targeted audience. I particularly like the way the book handled, it actually felt like a pulp novel in my hand and the cover is really neat and reminiscent of that period. My dilemma now is if I should keep it for myself or add it to the collection at the elementary school library where I work...
The Pentacle Pendant

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I sat down this morning and didn't stop reading until this story was done. I did this for many reasons, but the first one was that I just wanted to finish the story as quickly as I could because I found it so grisly. I had a hard time eating today. This is not your typical werewolf story (not by todays 'were' standards) so I was surprised with all the erm...feasting etc., Not for someone with a weak stomach, that's for sure.I could not help but be engrossed in the story itself (pun not intended but a funny accident!). I cared about what would happen to the main character and her friends and other connections. I loved the way that the nemesis of the story was so very evil and her origins were a wonderful idea. I haven't ever read a story like this which makes me value it even more. It was well written, well planned and concluded well, so I am happy with it. A nice diversion for a day (just not for a pizza party!)
The Traiteur's Ring

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When I first got this I was not really excited as military fiction (unless it's on a starship) just isn't 'my thing'. So I was pleasantly surprised to see how much it engaged me from the very beginning. I really wanted to know how it all turned out for the protagonist. It is a really intense book, I read it over two days eager to get to the finish. There isn't a lot of what I call filler or background establishing, we've got some suspense, mystery, emotional turmoil, some sex, and lots of action. And no endless prattle about procedure etc., to my great relief. You get it from the start... the lingo, the actions, the mission. I am curious to see what Jeff Wilson might write about next, and hope to read it if he does.
Women Scorned

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I gave this book such a low rating because it was just too hard for me to read. I am perfectly sure that it was a well written book, but the subject matter was too distressing for me to appreciate it. What I mean is, if someone who enjoys horror stories such as this, would probably like this book, but I couldn't get past the nausea and the lowered spirits that each paged invoked in me. This just isn't my genre and I will have to be particularly careful next time when choosing books from Early Reviewers in future.
Reign of the Nightmare Prince

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It is always a wonderful piece of luck when I get to read some new science fiction. Reign of the Nightmare Prince is a real treat. I liked the cover art, cared for the characters right away and raced through the story to see how it would all work out in the end. I was, of course, disugusted when I found out who the 'boogeymen' really are (it was pretty suspenseful until the mystery is taken away and you are faced with an ugliness in human nature that no-one can ever be comfortable with). I was worried about the ending, it did come up a little abruptly, I was wondering to myself "Is this a series? Am I just reading the first one?" I'm happy to say that the story ended satisfactorily, and I have an interest in seeing what might happen next. Will we see more about these characters and this world? I hope so!
The Birth House

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I absolutely loved reading this book. It is a beautiful book to hold in your hand as well as a beautiful story. Dora Rare is definitely a' rare' character and I read with concern and interest her story. This could have been a very awful book about awful people and the awful treatment of women, but instead, whilst being a very thorough look at life for women of that time period, it wasn't despairing but heartening instead, and I loved the strength of all the female characters. The notes in the back from the Willow Book are just lovely and I will be sure to give this novel to all my female friends along with a gift of raspberry tea.
Devil's Pass

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Sometimes starting a book that is nearly at the end of a series is not a bad thing! If given a choice I will never do that, but this book was written in such a way that I didn't feel like I was missing some of the story and there was enough here to help me connect with the others in this series (which I am going to seek out, as well as everything else I can get my hands on by Mr. Brouwer). This story was intense, and engaging right from the start, I really cared about the protagonist and was anxious for his happy ending. There are issues here that are very important to consider and I think it would interest my grade seven students (girls as well as boys). The book discussion would be very active!
Into The Land Of Snows

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I was fortunate to be given the opportunity to read this book. I was drawn in to the story of our protagonist, Blake, and cared much where his journey would take him. I didn't like him very much at the beginning, and it wasn't until close to the end that I had some hope for personal growth within him. I liked how author Ellis Nelson took me through a foreign country and showed me some of it's heart through the eyes of a seventeen-year-old boy, and I can't see anyone not enjoying this adventure without learning something as well.
Tritcheon Hash

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Ummm... wow! This story did not go the way I had expected it to. That is a plus right there... there is nothing expected about this story, yet the conclusion was logical, it could not have come out any other way. It was also funny. In the intensity and strangeness of a purely female world, these unexpected jabs of humor would pop out. I love the fact that the women on Coney Island are vegetarians and that the men are all meat-eaters. One thousand years into the future the planet Earth has not gotten any better because the inhabitants have not given up their meat. It's just as I suspected it would be, as a female and a vegan pacifist myself. I can't help wondering what it would really be like one day if men and women did separate and how such civilizations would evolve after a thousand years? It is after all, only logical isn't it?
1984

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It is a great puzzle to me why my highschool thought that I should read this when I was fifteen years old. There were some obvious issues that I could understand at such a tender age, yet there were subtleties I did not even notice. I did, naturally develop an interest in Orwell's books (bought most of them in my late teens/early twenties), but have not really appreciated them until now when I am in my early forties (with a great deal of experience and education to help me understand what was puzzling to me at fifteen). There is a brilliance without compare in his writing, an intelligence and perception that provokes deep emotion within me. Re-reading this twenty-five years later, I see a depth and undertanding in this book that I was amazed to read (and sorry to have missed the first time around). Things, that before I just acknowledged (like the abuse of the english language), gave me feelings of horror and shock. Since I have just recently read Mikhail Bolgakov's 'Master and Margarita', I recognise the template that Orwell used, and it is with dismay that I realised that Orwell did not have to imagine this, it has already happened in one form or another. It is a reminder/warning to me that Orwell's concerns are still valid and that the written word, democracy and basic humanity is still in danger. Sixty-two years later, this book is still relevant.
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