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Little Green: An Easy Rawlins Mystery

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Easy Rawlings is a private detective in Los Angeles. He is black and it is sixties; so he is a rarity. It begins with Easy waking up after being in a car crash that nearly kills him (except everybody thought he was dead). He is asked by his friend and sidekick, Mouse to locate the son of a friend who disappeared after taking acid. What follows his Easy trying to investigate while dealing with his sore body, someone else living in his home, the aftermath of the Watt Riots and hippies galore. Walter Mosley takes the reader back to the sixties with such a descriptive narrative and Easy is no superman but a guy trying to make a living and survive. I found it to be more than a mystery novel, I found it to be a study of what it was like living in that era. I got so absorbed in the culture and the story that I found myself finishing the book quickly. I enjoyed it this one very much.
Out of Range: A Novel

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Charlie Davis is a journalist who wants to make a difference, but while in Uzbekistan with his pregnant wife, Julie, he is almost killed. Trading his life on assignment to working of a Los Angeles newspaper, they live the life of a happy suburban family until Julie disappears after an outing with the kids. As he tries to find his wife, he is accused by the police, tortured by unknown assailants and finds out his wife may be leading a secret life. This fast paced thriller could certainly be a movie and sometimes it reads that way. But still this is a great summer escape and a exciting read. There weren’t any surprises and a lot seemed far-fetched, but I didn’t take away from what it was – an electrifying story of love against the odds.
Oscar Wilde and the Murders at Reading Gaol: A Mystery

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After spending some time in prison and being released, Oscar Wilde is asked by the governor to investigate murders that have taken place there. Take the life of an actual person, and make him similar to the fictional Sherlock Holmes is quite a fascinating idea. The locale and time period and Wilde’s observation skills make it an exceptional mystery. One gets to learn what prison life was like in the 19th century and learn more about the man himself. I read that this is the sixth and final book in this series, but I feel that it should continue, because it intriguing.
Fangs Out

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It begins with the execution of killer, Dorian Munz; who says just before his lethal injection that he did not kill his ex-girlfriend, it was one Greg Castle. A friend of Castle’s; Hub Walker hires Cordell Logan to investigate and find information that will refute the claim Munz made. Logan is a flight instructor, barely making ends meet, a former military assassin, and someone who I found interesting.Although the story was good, I really liked how the author has created a main character that is likeable, flawed and human. There is nothing special about him except his ability to investigate and push buttons. This novel is a satisfying mystery.
One Step Too Far: A Novel

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Emily Coleman decides to leave her husband and child and walks out the door and to start a new life for herself. Why would a woman who seemingly has a great life, loving family take off, change her name and live as someone else just to avoid her past? First, I have to say that I was quite taken aback when Emily left her family. It made me wonder why and that is the whole premise of the book. The mystery surrounds her leaving and doesn’t get resolved until close to the end. But this didn’t hold enough interest for me. The first half of the book is about how Emily leaves, changes her name, finds a place to love and gets a new job. Then we learn what her husband was going through after she left him. And we learn more about her mother and twin sister and what Emily’s prior life were like.
Lighthouse Bay: A Novel

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Libby Slater comes back home to Lighthouse Bay, after her married lover dies and she does not know what to do. She comes home to a sister that still holds a twenty year grudge and is weary Libby. This is also the story of Isabella Winterbourne, the only survivor of a ship wreck at Lighthouse bay in 1091. Isabella has own problems; still mourning the death of her son some three year earlier, she is hoping to disappear and run of to find her sister in America. But she the Winterbourne family is determined to find her and the secret she may know of their missing cargo.What these two stories have in common; is that both women have to move their pasts to enjoy their futures. I wasn’t sure that I was going to enjoy what is definitely a woman’s novel and a historic romance at that, but I found myself intrigued by Isabella’s story and how the author intertwines their stories around the lighthouse. Very entertaining indeed.
If You Were Here: A Novel of Suspense

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Former prosecutor turned journalist, McKenna Jordan watches an amateur video of a woman saving a teenager from an oncoming subway train and thinks it’s an old friend who disappeared ten years earlier without a trace. Thinking this would make a good story, she begins to investigate it. But what turns out to be an obsession becomes more mysterious when things begin to hinder her research and open secrets that she shouldn’t have. This novel begins with an intense scene through the subway and quickly becomes a story filled with suspense with shady characters, secrets and a cop that has to deal with his own problems. McKenna seems to make matters worse as she tries to find the truth to her friends’ disappearance. The author has created a whirlwind of a story that kept me interested until the end. Even then she adds a little twist. One character (which I won’t divulge) didn’t quite set right with me, but the rest of the characters were great.
NOS4A2: A Novel

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This is the story of Victoria “Vic” McQueen who can travel through time and space on her bicycle and across a on old-covered bridge. Here she can escape her life. It is also the story of Charlie Manx who also travel through tis world and another in his 1938 Rolls Royce where he brings children he feels who would be happier in what he calls Christmasland where the holiday is celebrated every day. When Vic encounters Charlie, all hell breaks loose and she is the only child to escape the evil that Charlie is, until they met again, that is… In the spirit of Stephen King this horror story is epic, graphic and sometimes quite frightening with twists and turns everywhere. Vic is a wonderful protagonist and is Charlie the perfect antagonist. The reader watches these characters develop and as the story unfolds. This one is over 700 pages of pure wickedness.
Sunset Key

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Letty Dobesh is off to the Florida Keys as she was hired to steal a Van Gogh from John Fitch, a very wealthy man. Although this is a novella it is not short on suspense, surprises and mystery. I have enjoyed many of Blake Crouch’s books, and this one is no different; I just was not expecting a quick read. I found out afterwards that this is part of an ongoing series of novellas, although this story stands on its own. Good work, Blake.
A Certain Summer

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Set on the small island of Wauregan right after WWII, Helen Wadsworth prays that her husband is still alive as he was declared MIA during a secret mission in occupied France. She has a son to take care off and begins to fall for Frank Hartman, her husband’s friend and partner on that ill-fated mission. She also starts to have feelings for yet another man, Peter Gavin, younger and also a survivor of the war with Japan. She finds it difficult to come to terms with the past and move on so that she and her son can move forward. This is more than a love story or mystery; it is a novel of human emotions, frailty and endurance. I found the characters to be well written and felt for each of the three. The reader gets to feel what it is like for those left behind without some sort of closure. The mystery wasn’t too mysterious, but didn’t take away from the drama. This one was certainly an enjoyable read!
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