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Wuthering Heights

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A hefty read, but oh so depressing, even the second time through.
Walk Two Moons

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An absolutely beautiful book and quite thought-provoking. Here's a book that you won't want to put down. The writing is wonderful and just may be my favorite summer read of 2010. Favorite quotes: "As I [Salamanca Tree Hiddle] walked home, I thought about the message. _In the course of a lifetime, what does it matter?_ I said it over and over. I wondered about the mysterious messenger, and I wondered about all of the things in the course of a lifetime that would not matter. I did not think cheerleading tryouts would matter, but I was not so sure about yelling at your mother. I was certain, however, that if your mother left, it would be something that mattered in the whole long course of your lifetime" (Creech 106). "But as I sat there thinking these things, it occurred to me that a person couldn't stay all locked up in the house like Phoebe and her mother had tried to do at first. A person had to go out and do things and see things, and I wondered, for the first time, if this had something to do with Gram and Gramps taking me on this trip" (Creech 257).
The Apothecary's Daughter

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I did not want this book to end. If you enjoy Jane Austin novels, you'll enjoy this one. It's full of longing, flirting, intelligent women and so much more. It's sad; it's happy. Just read it.
Deadline

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Entertaining book about a very serious subject. A mature senior finds out he only has about a year left to live and decides to live life to its fullest until then. This is an engaging book about doing your ultimate best and going beyond anything that you possibly thought you could do. There's romance and a touching relationship between two brothers who are very different and yet get along very well. They are so supportive of one another.
In a Perfect World: A Novel

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A lovely, yet disturbing book. Jiselle is a determined woman. I cannot seem to get this book off of my mind; perhaps, because I'm afraid it will be our future.
Viola in Reel Life

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Despite her somewhat tough exterior, Viola is a likable character. She's devastated when her parents drop her off at a boarding school in the mid-west while they go off to Afghanistan to shoot a documentary. Once she lets her roommates and some others into her life, Viola ends up finding out more about herself and those around her (both at boarding school and at home in Brooklyn). _Viola in Reel Life_ is a fun read and I'm anxious to talk to students at my school to see if the portrayal of boarding school life is realistic.
Masterpiece

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What a fun read: relationship between James and Marvin (beetle) explores friendship; enjoyed reading about artwork, especially of artists that previously I had not been familiar; quite an adventure story
Scat

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A super fun book with Hiassen's usual mix of eccentric, strange, and normal characters. _Scat_ is filled with a bit of mystery, some science and lots of humor. Once you start reading, you won't want to put this one down.
Cutting for Stone: A Novel

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I love this book. It keeps working on my mind days after I finished reading it. Some favorite quotes from the book: 'we all saw it the same way. The old man was right. The slippers in the story mean that everything you see and do and touch, every seed you sow, or don't sow, becomes part of your destiny . . . ' (286). Ah, the connectedness of our lives, the consequences of our decisions. Later ghosh explains: 'the key to your happiness is to own your own slippers, own who you are, own how you look, own your family, own the talents you have, and own the ones you don't. If you keep saying your slippers aren't yours, then you'll die searching, you'll die bitter, always feeling you were promised more. _Not only our actions, but also our omissions, become our destiny_' (286).What a character Ghosh is. When he becomes a professor, "the bowtie was his idea. In all things, especially when it cost little and did no harm to others, ghosh was his own man. The bowtie told the world how pleased he was to be alive and how much he celebrated his profession, which he called 'my romantic and passionate pursuit.' the way Ghosh practiced his profession, the way he lived his life, it was all that" (341).
Uncommon: Finding Your Path to Significance

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Dungy really wants to guide men in our society through this book. He has some wonderful advice. A couple of my favorite thoughts: "One of the most important things I have learned along the way is having the courage to stand by my convictions--those things that I know are right, those guiding principles that I know to stick with. Sometimes that means standing out from the crowd or not being popular, but sometimes that's the only responsible place to be" (29 - 30) "True respect starts with the way you treat others, and it is learned over a lifetime of acting with kindness, honor, and dignity" (178) Dungy also quotes Mark Twain: "Explore, Dream, Discover" (29). A book with good messages, but if you are not religious or are not open to religion, then you may not like this book.
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