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Death by Cashmere: A Seaside Knitters Mystery

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Having read all three of the author's previous mysteries (The Queen Bee Quilting Mysteries) as well as, unfortunately, one of her romances (not good) I was happy to note the quality of her descriptive writing was not diminished in this first volume of a new series. Unfortunately I was disappointed to be able to nail the killer almost as soon as the individual was introduced simply because the plot was almost a re-hash of the first volume of her other series. Different people, different locale but pretty much the same plot.Writing 4 stars; re-using the plot 3 stars.
The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York

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Excellent read. History (NYC in the 1920s-30s), science (forensic science and toxicology), poisons (murder intended and unntended), biography (Charles Norris and Alexander Gettler - where would CSI be today without these men) - but done in such a way as to hold one's interest. Very readable (and listenable)!
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

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Very interesting and readable book. Originally I wanted to read it for the historical background of the woman herself but I also very much enjoyed the scientific side - well written but not so technical that it is overwhelming. A good mix of science and social science.
Total Knee Replacement and Rehabilitation: The Knee Owner's Manual

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I purchased this book after having borrowed a copy from the public library prior to scheduling my own TKRs. It is a "must" for anyone contemplating or planning total knee replacement surgery. In addition to pre- and post-op preparations, the book includes excercises for all stages of recovery. Highly recommended.
The Funny Thing Is...

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Humorous, yes, but not laugh out loud funny. Perhaps droll is the word? Definitely glad I did the audio over print since one can hear her inflections, etc. I like DeGeneres but would not rush out to get another.
Don't Look Down

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This pertains to the audio version only. I had read the print version last year and enjoyed it so thought the audio would be a fun listen. Unfortunately this is not one of Brilliance Audio's better productions. It uses two readers, one for male parts, one for female. The editing in of the male parts was distinctly quieter than the female so that I was constantly turning the volume up and down. Renee Raudman did a good job on the female roles but I did not care for Patrick G. Lawlor for the men. I barely got through the first CD before pulling it from the car.
Devil's Food Cake Murder

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Well, I've got this series' formula down enough that I can pick the crime and/or villain within the first couple chapters. And the probable plot set-up for the next book is usually presented on the last couple pages. It's time to stop with this series.
If You Lived Here, I'd Know Your Name: News from Small-Town Alaska

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Essays about life - and death - in very, very small-town Alaska. Humorous, poignant. Worth reading.
The Dead Beat

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Fascinating intro to the fine art of writing obituaries and an uncomfortable look at some of the genre's cult-like followers.
The Royal Mess

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I really wanted to like this because the premise - Alaska is its own country - was so intriguing. The first book in the series wasn't too bad but with each successive book I kept wondering why I had wasted my money (and/or swap points). The language - both content and delivery - is terrible and totally unrealistic on so many levels. The lack of character development did not help; I found I could really care less about few of them. And, of course, the gratuitous sex. All of which makes me so very glad that the author's contract with the publishing company ran out so there will be no more of these. And if there are I certainly won't be reading them.
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