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Spirits Rising: Spirit Caller, #1

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A fun, quick read. Felt a little bit like a second book in a series, like we're missing the story of what happened when Rachel first came to the area and met Jeremy, before she fled on vacation to Mexico.
A Slepyng Hound to Wake: a novel

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I think Hound was a stronger book overall. This one seemed a little less focused, with a less of a cohesive theme. Henry buys a book from his acquaintance Eddy Perry, a sometimes bookhound, sometimes druggie, who is then murdered, possibly for the money Henry just paid him. Among Eddy'd possessions, Henry finds the manuscript for his finished novel, which he then decides to try to get published. He has to track down the woman to whom it's dedicated, but the tracking happens entirely offstage, and this plotline is ignored for a good chunk of the book. Meanwhile, Henry is forced to confront his relationships with the various women in his life, as they all make demands upon him. Like and good fictional hero, Henry pulls out solutions to all their problems, more or less, almost accidentally, while Albert again fills the wise / wise-cracking friend role.
Feynman

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This is a new graphic-biography of Richard Feynman, written by the always-great Jim Ottaviani, and drawn by Leland Myrick. Because I've read Feynman and Feynman bios in the past, the broad strokes were familiar to me, but I learned new info, too. It's a mostly-chronological (but sometimes thematic) overview of his life and achievements from childhood on, including highlights from several of his lectures. I understand Feynman diagrams much better now than I did before!
Hound: a novel

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I can't say it's not a mystery, because there is a murder, and our main character, bookhound Henry Sullivan, does figure out who committed it. But that's not what the book is about, and it doesn't read like I expect a mystery to read. This is a book about love and loss, parents and children, past and present. The most intriguing mystery is not who killed the murdered woman, but the story of the woman whose letters Henry finds early on, someone who was a traveler and a letter writer, and somehow connected to the Arts and Crafts movement.
The Automatic Detective

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Loved this book! The best yet from Martinez!
The Willoughbys

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Readers who enjoyed Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events will enjoy this tale, full of allusions the such childhood classics as Anne of Green Gables, The Secret Garden, and Mary Poppins.
Fighting Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis

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I've read about half this book so far. It seems more targeted at people with families, particularly women, that at single people like myself. Nonetheless, it has some potentially useful tools and information, and I hope to find more of the same in the second half. It's very readable and engaging.
My Story: A Photographic Essay on Life with Multiple Sclerosis

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I have not had timeyet to read this book cover to cover. I have, however, flipped through, reading bits and pieces of several of the profiles, and based on my sampling, I think this is the book I have been looking for since my own diagnosis in 2006. It's hard to explain to people -- including myself, and especially my family -- just what a diagnosis of MS means, because it means so many different things to different people. By profiling so many different people, with varying approaches to life, and varying ability levels, this book presents a broader picture than most of the ones I have previously seen.I anticipate expanding this review once I"ve read the book more thoroughly.
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