themusescircle

Reviews
More
A Temptation of Angels

by

I would have to agree with MargK, a previous early reviewer of Michelle Zink's A Temptation of Angels. The list of positive things about this book is very short. Here are a few of the positives:1)Like MargK mentioned in her earlier review, the author has a certain simple elegance to her writing, therefore it was easy to read.2)I liked that the story took place in London (Despite this, I had major issues with the setting—or lack thereof which I will get to shortly)3)Even though I agree that the author doesn’t really give us any new dimensions to her characters or the love triangle (we’ve read it all before), I will say that she did a good job at building the sexual tension and romantic moments between Helen and Griffin.Sadly, this is where the positives end. I don’t want to make this a long, drawn out review nor do I want to repeat the negatives that other reviewers have pointed out, so I am going to stick to my 3 main issues with this book.1.The setting. Like I said above, I was looking forward to reading this book partly because it was supposed to take place in London. The reason I enjoy reading books with settings around the globe should be obvious—it’s a way to learn about a country or time period without having to do extensive research (unless you want to). I think that is one of the important jobs an author has to do—transport you to that time and place, make you feel like you are there. Unfortunately, this does not happen in A Temptation of Angels. The author does not give us any specific dates (not always necessary) or landmarks, or historical references. Helen and the Channing brothers seem to walk everywhere—there is no mention of horses or cars—nothing that could help me get a better sense of what type of London the story takes place in. The only thing that finally gave me an idea where to place the story is when it is revealed that Helen wears corsets and that it is not proper etiquette for a young lady to be walking the streets alone, or to be living with young bachelors that are not her family. This of course is a big contradiction in the book. I’m not even going to go there since MargK’s review gets into detail the major contradictions of the mysterious and supposedly powerful organization called the Dictata.2.My other major problem with this book is this: the book is supposed to be about angels. Other then Helen and the Channing brothers being able to “jump” through light (as in being able to dissolve their bodies into tiny molecules through light in order to transport to other places), nothing else is explored as far as their abilities. What else can they do? Hell, if they are angels, aren’t they supposed to have wings? Not once are wings mentioned. 3.Lastly, this book is riddled with parts that are unbelievable, unnecessary, or just plain didn’t make sense. The author spends too much time on parts that could be simplified in a page or two while she does not give enough attention to things such as “Enlightenment” for example. What does it mean when one reaches “Enlightenment”? This term was mentioned several times in the beginning of the book but was never explored. What happened to Darius’ face? How did he get the scar? I also think that her reaction AND the outcome of the whole dart/dog situation was completely ridiculous. I don’t want to give it away since it would be a major spoiler, but it was a very poor plot device.To sum it up, the book had an interesting premise but the execution fell flat. For lack of a better way to say this, I was bored. Unless the finished product differs greatly from the ARC I just read, I don’t see this book making any great waves in the YA literature world.
The Lost Immortals: When Copper Suns Fall

by

I signed up for this e-book through goodreads "Read It & Reap" section under the group "Shut Up and Read". This story had such an interesting premise and me being a lover of angel themed books, I was really excited at the prospect of reading a different take on angel mythology. Unfortunately, When Copper Suns Fall did not live up to my expectations.First with the positives. I though the beginning was engaging and heartfelt. Chela, our main character, is sitting by the bedside of her twin brother who is in a coma from the glutovirus. In this dystopian world, there is no cure and Dr. Van Meter tries to convince Chela to give up hope and allow them to use Micah's body for critical research since he'd make a "strong vessel". But Chela stands firm, knowing deep down inside something isn't quite right and vows silently to herself that she will find the cure and the answers to her troubling questions.The mythology and new world the author creates is interesting and different. In this futuristic world, the Tribunal now governs and the citizens are given new rules to abide by in order to help rebuild what was lost during the "Great War." Children must now take "ale-meds" in order to protect their immune systems, when really it is to do something entirely different. It is forbidden to associate with Caduceans and the Tainted-- light and dark celestial creatures (angels) that are blamed for the Great War.All of these important factors are introduced in the beginning of the book and combined with the well written opening scene, I thought I was in for a real treat. But that is the big problem with this story. The author gives us the elements but doesn't EXPLAIN them! What happened during the "Great War"? I am not the type of reader that needs everything spelled out for me-- I like some mystery, drawing my own conclusions-- BUT, if you are going to introduce everyone to a new world and a new mythology, some sort of background story is a must if you want your reader to connect.My other issue was the characters. It's not that I hated Chela or any of the other characters, it's that I didn't really feel a connection with them. Here we go with that word "connect", right? Don't get me wrong, I was really feeling her turmoil in the beginning, but somewhere along the way I just lost interest :/ Oh and the love interests? I did love the scene when Faris was introduced. I liked the chemistry between the two. But then Seth came into the picture...then later you find out that Jalen has feelings for her....really? I guess I am just tired of that type of love triangle. Or is that a love square? Why do all the guys have to fall head over heels for the one girl? And if you are going to do it, then do it right because there are soooo many authors that have written GREAT love triangles, so much so that you can tell the difference between the good ones and the bad ones.Oh and since we are on the topic of Faris...okay, I love alpha males. If you've been reading my reviews, then you already know this. HOWEVER, there was way too much "wrist grabbing" if you get what I mean. Literally. Faris was constantly taking her by the WRIST instead of hand, or when she pulled her arm away, he would grab her arm/hand again. I love an alpha but not a caveman and if I notice hand grabbing in a book, then you know there is just way too much.I give When Copper Suns Fall a 2 1/2 star rating. I give the author a lot of credit for creating a unique world and new angel mythology to go with it. But without some back story to fill in the holes, to really make me feel like I was there and to better understand the characters plight, I found myself bored. I know this book is the first in a series, but I highly doubt I will be picking up book 2. I thank the gang at the goodreads.com group "Shut Up & Read" for giving me this opportunity to read and review this book.Mia
Muškarci koji mrze žene

by

I know this review is supposed to be about the book, but if it wasn't for me finally breaking down and watching the Swedish movie Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, I would have missed out on this novel. Like the movie, the book is a little slow to start. I thought maybe some things got lost in translation since the book was translated from Swedish to English for American readers. But things finally began to settle into place. The book definitely filled in some gaps where parts of the movie left me pondering on a few things. I do know that there is an extended edition of the Swedish movies coming out in a couple of weeks, so I can't fault the movie if parts were editted out on purpose. Stieg Larsson amazes me. The book is deep. If you don't believe me, check out the family tree of the Vanger legacy in the beginning of the book. He throws in so many topics, issues, and themes that I could see someone teaching this trilogy at the college level for a whole semester, no joke! The last thing I want to say is this. If you like a good mystery, suspense that is unpredictable then definitely read this book. If you are not into reading and are a more visual person, then the Swedish Dragon Tattoo movie is a must. It follows the book very closely. The main reason why I decided to read the book is because there is an American version of the film coming out in December and I wanted to make sure I was up to date. I heard there were going to be some changes, and things added in to the American version and while I am cool with that, I didn't want to compare this version of the film with the original version without reading the book. I will say this in closing--the actress that played Lisbeth (dragon tattoo girl) in the original Swedish version, Noomi Rapace, is SPOT ON. All the little character ticks that is mentioned in the book was beautifully executed in the movie. Noomi Rapace is an amazing, dedicated actress that wanted to get that role right. Everything from her facial expressions (or lack there of) to her body (I watched an interview where the actress said that if she was going to play the part, she wanted to fully embrace the character)-- she trully GOT the part. My only worry is the new actress for the American version. I have only watched the trailers so I don't want to sell her short. But she really does have some big shoes to fill.
Autobiography of a Recovering Skinhead: The Frank Meeink Story as Told to Jody M. Roy, Ph.D.

by and

Autobiography of a Recovering Skinhead is the story of Frank Meeink's violent childhood filled with abuse and neglect and his descent into America's Nazi underground. The book chronicles his years as a Skinhead in South Philly and his scary rise to leadership of his own group called "Strike Force". He tells us about his years on the streets, his years in prison, his years of trying to turn his life around, and his years of battling drug addiction.Autobiography of a Recovering Skinhead has taught me many thing, such as the true definition of a Skinhead, how one becomes a Skinhead, the difference between a Skinhead, the KKK, and other white supremacist associations. Frank's words have introduced me to all kinds of new terminology, people, and groups, such as SHARPs (Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice).Frank's story has taught me the true meaning of the phrase "there is a thin line between love and hate" and most importantly, the power of self-worth and forgiveness.I wanted this post to be more of a recommendation than a review because I truly feel that reading this book is an experience one should explore and come to terms with on their own. I don't want to sit here and analyze, dissect, or JUDGE. I just want to make people aware that this book exists and despite how I feel about Frank Meeink himself, it needs to be read.The book is vulgar, raw, and makes no apologies in its brutal honesty and that is why somehow, some way kids need to be exposed to it. Despite the profanity, the violence, and other sometimes offensive comments, Frank's story will not only benefit the ignorant adult but may save the lives of teens going down a very bad path.
Coffeehouse Angel

by

There are quite a few reasons why I gave this book a 4 star rating. One is its originality. Let's put the angel thing on hold for a minute and focus on the main character. Katrina is a 16 year old girl who has been living with her grandmother ever since the tragic death of her parents. Their little apartment is nestled above Anna's Old World Scandinavian Coffeehouse, the family business that is just barely keeping a roof over their heads. Katrina knows every aspect of the store, could probably run it in her sleep. I really like the "life" that the author gave her main character. There are so many books out there where the lead heroine comes from either a good home with both parents alive or occasionally may come from a single parent home. Being a teacher, I am quite surprised at how many kids live with their grandparents or another relative. While this story takes the tragic death angle, in real life kids that live with a relative are usually abandoned because many parents are unfit to take care of their child, some falling into alcoholism and drug abuse. So this story, from the very beginning, takes on a very realistic tone. The fact that Katrina must also work adds to it. While many other readers may find it sad that she has had to work from a very young age, I think this gives her character. She has a sense of responsibility and a set of business skills that many teenagers her age don't really obtain until they are in or finished college. This working life style is so second nature to Katrina that she doesn't realize until the end how important these skills are.Suzanne Selfors is also original with her angel mythology. Nowadays we have tons of vampire and werewolf books out there and I think it is safe to say that some of them can be boring because the mythology is the same. Angel themed books are becoming quite popular as I have just read two before this one. What makes Selfors' story stand out is that her angel, Malcolm, does not have wings on his back. Instead, his wings are located on the back of his feet, near his heels!Another unique thing about Malcolm is the fact that...he WEARS A KILT!!! FINALLY an author that is not afraid to try something different! I was beginning to think I was the only one left that thought men in kilts are SeXy! Oh and did I forget to mention he also has a wee bit of a Scottish brogue? ^_~Besides falling deeply in love with Malcolm, I also commend the author for creating such rich minor characters like Katrina's grandmother Anna and "The Boys," the group of old men that are fiercely loyal to the coffeehouse and its owners.Lastly, Suzanne Selfors' sense of humor is contagious! I found myself quite a few times laughing out loud. Not only is Katrina funny but some of the things that Malcolm does are adorable. Remember, Malcolm is an angel in between missions, his last being in Scotland. He really doesn't live anywhere, therefore he is unfamiliar with the type of foods say you or eye grew up eating. For example, there was a part in the book where he was just tasting everything; one minute he had a mouth full of jam, the next he was squirting mustard or ketchup in his mouth. There are definitely many LOL moments in this story.While I enjoyed Coffeehouse Angel, there are a couple of reasons why I gave it 4 stars instead of 5. One reason is due to the lack of development in the author's angel mythology. If Selfors kept her mythology normal, such as Malcolm having wings on his back instead of on his heels, I wouldn't have questioned anything. However, as soon as it was revealed that Malcolm is not your "typical" angel, my curiosity was piqued and I was waiting for the author to explain more. I even at one point thought that she was mixing Greek Mythology into her story since the location of Malcolm's wings reminded me of Hermes, the "messenger" of the Greek gods. Oh, and did I forget to mention that Malcolm is also a "messenger"? Must I say more? There is nothing wrong with crossing mythologies, but if you are going to do it, it better be thorough or else you are going to confuse the reader. I did have a moment where I thought, Ohhhh, wait, he isn't an angel, he is actually Hermes! But when I read on and it was finally, truly confirmed that he was an angel, I was kind of scratching my head at the end of the story. I commend Selfors for trying something new, I just wish she had expanded on it some more!My only other complaint is I wish there had been more Malcolm. Selfors starts the novel strong. She creates this mysterious, sexy, kilt wearing Angel but really does not put enough of him on the pages. I know this is Katrina's story, but I think this is one of those cases where the author would have benefited more by alternating between her and Malcolm's point-of-view. I know us women love a mysterious man but it definitely would not have hurt if she had put a few more scenes with Katrina and Malcolm getting to know each other.Overall, this was a funny, romantic story that I will definitely be recommending to my students and my friends. I will also be looking forward to reading more books by Suzanne Selfors.
Aftertime

by

**The following review may contain SPOILERS** I'm not sure what is going on with me recently, but it's apparent that I have become obsessed with apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic novels as of late. From Ann Aguirre's Enclave to Daniel H. Wilson's Robopocalypse, I have a pretty vivid picture of what it would be like if vampires or robots took over the world. Now I can add zombies to the list! So here are a few things I loved about Aftertime. Cass, our protagonist, is more of a relatable character than a likeable one. She is a recovering alcoholic who allowed men to use and abuse her body because of her low self-esteem and lack of self worth. Cass has never really been good at anything except for 2 things-- loving her daughter and surviving. We've all heard stories on the news or read about people getting second chances after experiencing some kind of tragedy. Cass easily falls into this category. It's as if she's been asleep for a really long time and suddenly snaps awake. Speaking of waking up abruptly, that leads me to another thing I liked about the book. The story doesn't start before the apocalypse or way after. It starts with Cass walking after waking up without any recollection as to where she is or how she got there. But there is one thing she can't deny-- the fact that the "Beaters" (aka zombies) had somehow gotten to her and she survived. The proof was the torn, half eaten skin on her back...and the new growth of skin quickly regenerating. Creepy right? I give Sophie Littlefield a lot of credit for taking a different approach in hooking the attention of her readers. I also admire the author's zombie mythology. While it may not be wholely unique, there are still a few things that set it apart from zombies in other stories. The zombies or "Beaters" as they are called in Aftertime, only like eating skin. They don't get off on eating body parts or tearing out your internal organs to have a feast. Nope, these guys love skin, hence the reason why Cass's back is torn to shreds when we are first introduced to her. Also, these zombies are not stupid, mindless creatures. Some of them have retained knowledge from their pasts, which is why 1 may try talking while another might try pushing a wheel barrel down the street, etc. While they may try biting you on the spot, they much rather take you back to their "nest" so they can feast on your flesh without being interrupted. Yuck! Even though this story is about Cass and her grim determination to find her daughter and come to terms with her past, Littlefield brilliantly shows us the deterioration of human society through Cass's journey and the people she meets along the way. From those who rather live in isolation and fend for themselves to the Rebuilders who feed off people's fear in order to rebuild society in the way they see fit, to the junkie camps-- a place for people to trade things in order to get their next fix and rather drown themselves in alcohol and drugs then face reality. And lastly, the religious fanatics. Let me not forget to mention Smoke. Sexy, mysterious Smoke, the man who helps Cass continue her search for her daughter and stirs something deep within her heart... Okay so now for my dislikes. I can honestly say that my issues with this book has nothing to do with the author, but whoever was her editor. The editor did a shitty job for several reasons. One is the ungodly long run-on sentences here and there, the major one being on page 102. The sentence goes on for 12 lines and is marked as if it is one big paragraph. Sometimes run-on sentences work, but not in this case. There are also parts in the book where the author contradicts herself. For example, on page 123, Cass takes her shirt off, looks at her back in the mirror, and comes to the conclusion that the wounds weren't as bad as she expected and that they are healing fast. Then on page 140, Cass acts like she never had looked at herself in the mirror 30 pages before and is completely horrified by what she sees. Another contradition is when Cass and Smoke reach the library where there are other survivors. Smoke is only patted down to make sure he is not carrying any weapons. Cass, on the other hand, is taken into a bathroom by a woman who used to be her friend. There, Cass has to completely strip out of her clothes. Now, I get the trip to the bathroom was so that her friend could have a moment of privacy to tell her important information about Cass's missing daughter. I even get that the author needed a way for Cass's friend to see the scars on her back for a specific plot purpose. However, it makes no sense for Smoke only to be patted down while Cass has to get completely naked in order to prove she has no weapons on her. While you might think the run-on senstences and contradictions may be the author's fault, I put the blame more on the editor since they are the ones who are supposed to read the book for the sole purpose of correcting errors such as these. Overall, this was a solid first book in what I believe is going to be a trilogy. The second in the series-- Rebirth-- is already out. So if you are having trouble weeding through the hundreds of zombie themed books in search for something different, Aftertime is definitely worth it.
Replication: The Jason Experiment

by

I was able to snag an early copy of Replication from NetGalley in exchange for a review. It was an interesting read to say the least. As the synopsis states above, Martyr, along with 55 other boys, are all "Jasons" or clones, living in the secret, underground labs of Jason Farms. Most of the boys have nicknames, given to them by the mean-spirited guards based upon their actions or specific characteristics. For example, Baby obtains his name because he sucks his thumb and is considerably smaller then the other boys. Hummer does nothing but rock back and forth and hum. Martyr is known for protecting those in the facility who are weaker and picked on (especially Baby), often resulting in him receiving "marks" or punishment.While the nicknames might be cool, what I found disturbing is that the doctors of Jason Farms viewed them as only numbers. Instead of having birth names, each boy was given a number depending on what "batch" and "condition" he was born in. Martyr, being healthy with no birth defects, is a level 3. Baby, with his abnormally large head, inability to speak, and small stature, is a level 1 or 2. The boys with severe deformities are called "brokens". So while the guards or the other "Jasons" may call Martyr by his nickname, the doctors address him as J:3:3. Talk about being just a number, right?The author, Jill Williamson, presents us with many disturbing, heart-wrenching scenes, scenes that help us put in perspective how far scientists will go in the name of science or for their own hidden agendas. The "Jasons" are educated but are not allowed to see or wear anything of color. No wonder Martyr gladly accepts 2 "marks" for getting out of his seat to touch Dr. Goyer's red tie. Or the fact that he wants to see the blue sky before he "expires" in less than 30 days. Since we are on the topic of expiring, Dr. Kane and the rest his medical team have repeatedly lied to the "Jasons", weaving a tale about how the air above ground is toxic to breath and they must give up their own lives to save humanity.So now you're probably wondering what's the real reason for cloning so many "Jasons" and keeping them in the dark? Of course that is for you to discover, although it's not hard to figure out. Determined to see the sky before he dies on top of finding out some disturbing information that makes him question his purpose even further, Martyr is able to escape the lab by stealing Dr. Goyer's key card and hitching a ride in the back of his truck without him knowing it. Dr. Goyer is a new member of the medical team at Jason Farms. He's not only new, but appears to be a little sympathetic towards Martyr.When Dr. Goyer arrives home, Martyr sneaks into the house and hides in a room upstairs. Little does he know that the room he hides in is Abby's (Dr. Goyer's daughter). Abby is a smart, goal oriented young woman with strong religious beliefs and values. Her faith in God has helped her to come to terms with the loss of her mother, who died from cancer. Her father on the other hand is still in mourning. I got the sense that he blames himself for not being able to find a cure quick enough to save his wife. Unlike Abby, he puts his faith in what he can see in front of his microscope and lab results. Of course once Abby finds Martyr in her room and puts 2 and 2 together, Replication becomes the basis for the religion vs. science debate. Hold that thought because I'm going to come back to it in a minute.The chapters that follow Martyr seeing the real world for the first time is both comical and sad. It's nothing we haven't seen before in movies (Powder, Encino Man, etc.) but nonetheless still effective. I won't get into any of those details since I think it's important for the reader to experience it on their own. However, it's worth mentioning that the Williamson did a great job illustrating how much we take for granted just by the way Martyr is in awe of the tiniest things.Most of the reviews I've seen posted so far for Replication have been extremely positive. Even though I commend the author for writing about a topic that is controversial, edgy, and adds something unique to the Young Adult literature world, I did have some issues with this book. My first major problem is the heavy-handed religious proselytizing that takes place from the time Martyr meets Abby to the end of the story. Before I get rocks thrown at me and hate mail, let me say that I found out an important factor AFTER I finished the book. Apparently, Jill Williamson is a Christian author and that Replication was published by Zondervan, a Christian publishing company. Let me make this clear. This is NOT a bad thing! I have nothing against Christian writers, publishing companies, etc. It was my fault for not doing some research before or during my reading experience. That being said, if I had known ahead of time, I could have gone into the book better prepared. Instead, I was highly annoyed when whole chapters turned into Abby preaching to Martyr, sending him to a pastor, the pastor putting a bible in his hand, Martyr reading the bible, Martyr becoming a devote Christian within what-- 2-4 days of his break out of the lab??Even knowing now about the origins of the book, I still feel the religious aspects of it was too excessive and a bit unrealistic. I know that when it comes to the idea of cloning, religion can play a big part in the ethical debate between religion vs. science. I get that. I was even fine when I realized that Abby was going to take the religious stance while her father took the other side. But it was pretty obvious the book had more than one agenda and that was a major turn off.My other issues are minor. The author did a lot of "telling" and not enough "showing". Williamson used 3rd person narration which is a great device to use because you can get into more than 1 character's head. However, I don't think she used it to her full advantage. I was also bothered by Mr. Markley's lack of emotion when it is confirmed what really happened to his wife. I can't say any more about that for spoiler purposes, but it also could be an issue with the writing. Also, what happened to JD??? If these things could have been tweaked, I think the book would have an even greater affect on readers' emotions.Overall, Williamson impressed me with the subject matter, how she took her time developing her characters, and finding the perfect formula for adding comic relief without taking away from the seriousness of the story. If anyone is interested in an adult version of the cloning debate, I highly recommend a book called, Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro. The book recently became a movie, also called Never Let Me Go. Warning: if you decide to watch the movie, have a box of tissues handy.
Graffiti Moon

by

Reading Graffiti Moon was an absolute pleasure. Not only was the book beautifully written, but setting the story around art--specifically 2 art forms (graffiti and glass-blowing) that are not really focused on in most novels, is pure genius. I'm not sure if this book is a product of research or if the author grew up around graffiti artists and glassblowers. Whichever it is, Cath Crowley did an amazing job with her descriptions of Shadow's many walls throughout the city and Lucy's passion for glass-blowing.Graffiti has always been an interesting art form to me. It's fascinating how someone can take a basic idea, object, or thing and blow it up on a wall to either express how they feel or to convey a message to the world. And how fast the artists work! I know for many it's the adrenaline rush that gives them the energy to work feverishly.The glass-blowing aspect was a pleasant surprise. I knew the book was about a girl who is searching for a graffiti artist named Shadow, but I never expected Lucy to be a glassblower! The reason this excites me is because I live in the South Jersey area (in the US) and grew up near a place called Wheaton Village. It is the home of the Museum of American Glass and when I was a kid, I would go on class trips there. And guess what? We got to actually watch glassblowers do exactly what is described in Graffiti Moon! So talk about bringing back childhood memories!Even though the book is under 300 pages and majority of the story is told within a 24 hour period, the story is packed tight with different themes that many teens go through. Also, strong characterization earned Graffiti Moon a star alone. Cath Crowley is a master of detail. As I was reading along, I couldn't help but take some character notes. Check out my notes below:----- ----- -----Lucy: In search of a mysterious Graffiti Artist named Shadow. She is very artistic herself-- she practices glass-blowing. Her parents are very eccentric and because of this, she has perhaps a little more freedom then most teens her age. Her father, who currently is staying in the shed, is a magician, working on his jokes and tricks. Her mother is in the process of writing a novel. Although her parents try to explain to Lucy that they just need space during these creative processes, she thinks they are headed for a divorce. Do they eventually get a divorce? Will Lucy find the ever allusive Shadow?Jazz: Jazz is Lucy's best friend and claims to be psychic. She has a flair for drama and wants to go into acting. Since this is their last year of high school, she wants to find passion--in the form of a kiss-- to use that "experience" during auditions once they graduate. Could Leo be the muse she is looking for?Ed: Ed lives with his mother in a tiny flat. His mom is putting herself through nursing school while working nights. Ed was working in a paint store until the owner, Bert, died of a heart attack. Ed once had a thing for Lucy. They went on a date but like most young men, he let his hormones get the best of him and he touched her butt. She instinctively elbowed him in the nose, breaking it. Two weeks later, he drops out of school. Could Ed still have feelings for Lucy? Why did he drop out of school?Leo: Leo is Ed's best friend and he writes beautiful poetry. He borrowed money from Malcolm Dove and has only a certain amount of time to pay him back before Dove and his goons come after him. Leo devises this plan for him and Ed to break into the school and steal supplies so they can get cash to pay Malcolm back. When he meets Jazz, feelings he thought were long buried because of another girl, start to resurface. Could Jazz be a game changer? Why did Leo borrow money from Malcolm Dove? Will his plan work or will he drag Ed down with him?----- ----- -----Besides excellent characterization, I mentioned before that Cath Crowley has a beautiful way with words. Perspectives alternate between Lucy and Ed, but right before Ed's sections start, Leo's poetry is on display, some assignments for school, and others...well, you will see. Not only is the poetry moving, but Crowley's use of imagery throughout the novel is astounding. Here is one of my favorite examples, Ed describing how he feels about Lucy: “I kept dreaming her and me were tangled like that. Kept dreaming of this spot she had on her neck, this tiny country. I wanted to visit, to paint a picture of what I found there, a wall with a road map of her skin.” Beautiful, right?Here is another great quote, Ed describing how he feels about art and his struggle with reading and writing: "Feels like art's the only thing I ever figured out. Words, school, I never got the whole picture...I'd try to make a tunnel round the teacher's voice so it came to me clear. Most days I couldn't do it. I'd hear it all and so I'd hear nothing. Like I was standing in a place where every sound was the same level and I couldn't separate the threads."I can keep quoting this book forever. Here's one more before I move on to my last point. When Lucy tells Ed that her father is a magician. He says, "My dad was a magician too. Got my mom pregnant and disappeared."I want to wrap up this review by making people aware that the author is Australian and Graffiti Moon is set in Australia. I love books that are set in other countries because I think it's a great way to learn about a different area, a different culture, etc. And although we may learn different things from other areas, what remains the same is the issues our teens go through on a daily basis all over the world. I'm so happy that someone noticed Cath Crowley's Graffiti Moon and that it's finally being published over here in the United States. I'm sure where ever this book goes, teens and adults alike will see it for the rare gem it truly is.~Mia~
Savor the Danger

by

Wow. Let me say that again. WOW. I am not sure why I waited so long to read this book when I plowed through the other two in Lori Foster's Men Who Walk the Edge of Honor series. Maybe I just needed a break or got distracted with something else. Whatever the reason, Savor the Danger was excellent! I absolutely loved the first book in the series, When You Dare. Even though I liked Trace's story in Trace of Fever, it still couldn't touch book 1. Now after reading the the third in the series, I am torn as to which book was better-- When You Dare or Savor the Danger. What I am even more excited about is the fact that the series is not ending. Foster did a good job introducing us to Arizona and her future Alpha hero Spencer. This series, in my opinion, is quite refreshing. I love my alpha male--type romance novels, and lately real good ones are hard to find. Recently, I have been disappointed with my 3 "go to" authors when I need an alpha male fix-- Lora Leigh, Christine Feehan, and Sherrilyn Kenyon. These authors used to be masters at weaving hot, hunky, dominate male heroes and the women they fall in love with. Each of these authors have long running series that just are running out of steam.In the meantime, Lori Foster put out these 3 great stories within months of each other and I can honestly say, hands down, she is my new favorite author when it comes to alpha heroes.I look forward to A Perfect Storm, book 4 in the Men Who Walk the Edge of Honor series. It's just a shame I have to wait until 2012 to read it!
scribd