squirreltao_1

Reviews
More
Einstein's Dreams

by

This is an unusually lyrical work for a work of science fiction, and that makes it stand out. It's a collection of vignettes that describe in a poetical, dreamlike way what Einstein might have imagined if he had imagined how people would live if time had been different than we experience it. I've never read anything else quite like it.
Computers, Pattern, Chaos and Beauty

by

There's nothing else like this in the genre of computer graphics books. It contains a dazzling variety of mappings from quantifiable phenomena to computer graphics. The graphics make it possible for human beings to recognize patterns they would not have otherwise been able to see. This book requires some mental effort on the part of the reader, but the reader who sticks with it will find that the very nature of visual perception itself, as well as its relationship to reality, becomes a phenomenon that inspires childlike wonder.
New Active Birth: A Concise Guide to Natural Childbirth

by

This is the most helpful writing on childbirth that I have ever read. There is detailed information about various positions for laboring and what their advantages are.
Crossing the Rubicon: The Decline of the American Empire at the End of the Age of Oil

by

Michael Ruppert, a former LAPD narcotics detective, goes after the biggest organized crime in history in this book - the Bush administration at the time of 9/11. He asks the reader to play the role of a jury, as he establishes his case against the criminals, through proving beyond a reasonable doubt motives, means and opportunity. To those who would say this book is about 9/11 conspiracy theory, Ruppert would say, "I don't deal in conspiracy theory. I deal in conspiracy fact." This book has never been debunked. It has been met with a thunderous silence.
Abduction: Human Encounters with Aliens

by

The author, John E. Mack, is a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. This book is the outcome of him listening to alien abduction stories from hundreds of his patients and taking them seriously. He takes seriously that his patients had some kind of an experience that affected them profoundly and about which they feel and express authentic emotions. Ultimately, I feel he finesses the question of the status of the abduction reports in terms of objective reality. Still, I respect his courage to bear witness to the first hand testimonies he's heard.
Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge: A Radical History of Plants, Drugs, and Human Evolution

by

Terrence McKenna weaves a new kind of story about the human adventure, out of a collection of facts that he has gleaned from his prodigious research into the hidden history of human psychedelic use. He makes a strong case that psychedelic use played a role in the evolution of spiritual consciousness as well as perhaps even human language. He also argues persuasively about the roles that various kinds of drugs and foods have played within societies of the past and present, correlating the chemicals we ingest and have ingested, with apparent changes in our individual and collective consciousness.
Choosing Waterbirth: Reclaiming the Sacred Power of Birth

by

This book is written by a midwife who also had four waterbirths. She not only gives information about waterbirth and preparing for it. She also tells the story of each of her births.
Chaos, Creativity, and Cosmic Consciousness

by , , and

This isn't a conventionally written book. It consists of a three-way dialogue among Rupert Sheldrake, Ralph Abraham and Terrence McKenna. It's deliberately and honestly speculative in nature. It introduces a lot of ideas that are interesting to ponder, ideas having to do with the possible history and possible future of the cosmos, the earth and human beings. Sheldrake's theory of morphic resonance comes into play, while Abraham brings chaos theory into the mix. McKenna brings imagination to it, imagination enriched from his lifelong psychedelic explorations. I found it worth reading, but I would warn other potential readers that everything in it is completely raw and freewheeling. Also, I think it would be hard to develop the ideas it contains very much, since they're so very vague and nebulous. A little more effort put into defining many of the terms would have helped.
scribd