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Tender Morsels

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Very rarely does a book of such high quality twist my stomach into knots. Tender Morsels is definitely one of the most disturbing books I have read, but it is also a triumph in the beauty of modern fairy tales. After undergoing tremendous amounts of physical, psychological, and sexual abuse from a number of men, fifteen year old Liga, along with her two infant daughters, magically transports herself to the world of her heart's desire. Here she rears her daughters in a land where the men are distant, shy, and respectful. Years later, however, Liga's world comes crashing down when Urdda disappears and a witch arrives, disrupting Liga's precious dream and forcing her to step back into the real world with all its hardships and memories.
Annotated Sword of Shannara, The: 35th Anniversary Edition

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The Sword of Shannara is not a terrible book. It just isn't a very good one. I found the plot and cast of characters to be too similar to The Lord of the Rings to be enjoyable. It was distracting. I always knew what was coming next. Reading this book was like tasting the store brand version of Tolkien's work. If I am going to put that much time into a book, I would rather re-read The Lord of the Rings. Comparable to The Lord of the Rings and pretty much anything published by TOR and TSR (WotC)
The Mists of Avalon, Book Three: King Stag

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This sweeping epic fantasy based on Arthurian legend is a must read for fantasy lovers and devotees to Arthurian tales. I would only recommend it to older teens or serious fantasy die hards. Things that could make some squeamish: incest, orgies, rape, murder, meandering theological debates, etc.Read-a-likes: The Once and Future King, Le Morte d'Arthur, Queen of Camelot by Nancy McKenzie
The Amaranth Enchantment

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The Amaranth Enchantment is a new fairy tale with many classic elements - a poor but beautiful girl, a handsome prince, and a little bit of magic thrown in. Romance and fairy tale fans are sure to love this.  
The Crimson Crown (The Seven Realms Series, Book 4)

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The conclusion of the Seven Realms series does not disappoint. This series is highly reccommended for fans - boys and girls - of high fantasy.  
Dodger

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Dodger is the star of this adventure set in Victorian London's underbelly, literally. Dodger makes a living by trolling through the city's sewers looking for coins, jewelry, and other valuables tossed away and lost by London's upper classes. His plucky attitude and hankering for a fight lands Dodger in the middle of a scandal way over his head. Full of Pratchett's signature humor and wordplay, Dodger is a fun, but lengthy read. Pratchett does a little to much telling and it makes for a cumberosme read at times. Overall enjoyable, but not for reluctant readers.  
Lovely, Dark and Deep

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Unfortunately, there is nothing lovely, dark or deep about this book. I have to admit, I picked it up because I thought the cover was beautiful. I know, I know... but I was hoping the content would live up to the stunning design of the book. Nope. The main character, yeah, I cannot even remember her name, that's how fantastic the writing was, is involved in a tragic car accident her senior year of high school. (It was some type of bird...Robin? Wren? Wren! That's it.) Wren walks away from the wreck without a scratch, but her boyfriend is not so fortunate. This sends her into a semi catatonic state where she refuses to talk to anyone or participate in life at all. She moves in with her father in his rural North Eastern house on the coast where she lives in a seclusion for about a year. Then she meets a boy. Surprise! Boy drags her out of herself and she wonders how she would ever live with out him, blah, blah, blah. She is weak, dependent, and fragile and it takes a boy to save her. Like I haven't read that one a million times before.
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